Goodbye Toucan Sam

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An era has ended. Kellogg’s has announced it will no longer market its sugared cereals to children.

Kellogg’s also said it would stop using licensed characters (like Shrek and Spongebob) and branded toys to promote its products, according to today’s New York Times.

Will Toucan Sam (Froot Loops) and Dig ‘em Frog (Smacks) soon go the way of Sugar Pops Pete? Stay Tuned!


  • http://www.goldenagecartoons.com Matthew Hunter

    That’s a shame. The real problem is parents not watching what their kids are eating, let alone what they’re buying. Toucan Sam isn’t making kids fat, too much of his product is. In moderation, that stuff’s fine (and I love Fruit Loops, still buy ‘em on occasion!)

  • Steve Halvorsen

    I suppose this is another nail in Linus The Lionhearted’s coffin. Cereal commercials haven’t been entertaining for years, but it would be a terrible shame to lose more Americana.

  • Steve Halvorsen

    They will live on forever in the Advertising Icon Museum when it opens in Kansas City next year! http://www.advertisingiconmuseum.com/

  • J.V.

    Fun is being slowly outlawed. More wasted time and money trying to parent for those incapable of parenting. So, the kids forget about boring (or at least not-too-interesting) cereal , entertainment, music etc. and take it out in truly destructive ways just to feel like something other than a speciman in a jar. Larry, Moe and Curly would probably be doing life in prison by today’s standards … end of rant.

  • http://pediatristsplayground.blogspot.com Kevin W. Martinez a.k.a. Leviathan

    I don’t know about the rest of you, but I LOVE this all Modern Big Brother Ultra-PC nannyism. Sure our society’s going to hell in a handbasket, but we can at least take solace in the fact that pompous, self-serving individuals will continue to abuse the legal system for their own personal and political gain.

    Does this mean Kellogg’s is going to make it’s commercials hipper and edgier in order to target different audiences in order to make up for all the lost revenue potential?

  • http://wardomatic.blogspot.com Ward

    This will last like, a week or so.

  • mickhyperion

    Kellogg is not saying they won’t use Toucan Sam, Tony the Tiger, or any of the characters they own. What they have agreed to is to (from the CBN article) is to not “Use licensed characters on mass-media ads directed primarily to kids under 12 or on the front labels of food packages unless they meet the [new nutrition] standards.” They have until the end of 2008 to make these products fit the new nutrition guidelines established. As long as they do that, they can continue to market their products using their own characters all they want, just not Shrek, Spongebob, or other characters they have merely licensed. The same rule applies to their inclusion of toys in cereal.

  • Chris Sobieniak

    A part of me just died suddenly….

    Seems like the best things in life are RUINED by those that can never shut up or pay attention when it really mattered (like that guy who did that stupid movie that forced the extra/bigge/king size options in fast food combos off the menu, nice try fatty)!

  • Jeff Kurtti

    “The advertising agreement does not apply to marketing characters Kellogg owns, like Tony the Tiger, but it does apply to characters the food company licenses, like the cartoon figure Shrek, said Susan Linn, co-founder of the Campaign For A Commercial-Free Childhood.”
    –Associated Press

  • http://doubleben.blogspot.com/ Emmett Goodman

    This really is the end of an era. At least it is if Toucan Sam goes. I was never a big Fruit Loops eater, and I wasn’t always compelled by commercials as a kid. But I always found the character of Toucan Sam to be very appealing, and it was worth it just to watch him in the commercials. Part of that appeal came from the charming voice-over provided by actor Maurice LaMarche (one of the VO greats). And how often does such an exotic animal like a toucan get to endorse a commercial product. This is going to take some getting used to.

  • Chris Sobieniak

    It’s moments like this that make me want to move to Japan where my best friend’s at (haven’t heard of them clamping down on the rediculous advertising to children that still exists there).

    At least it’s not as bad as Norway, where advertising to children on TV is illegal I think.

  • http://sterfish.blogspot.com Sterfish

    I don’t think those characters are going away anytime soon. The article doesn’t say that the company would stop marketing its sugared cereals to children. It says that it would stop marketing cereals that don’t meet certain standards to children if they don’t reformulate them. Even then, the standards are actually kind of lenient. Frosted Flakes already meets them.

    They’ll tweak other cereals to fit the new standards and likely still keep our beloved characters around a bit longer. Unfortunately, the cereals will probably taste worse but I guess that’s the price to pay.

  • Steve Gattuso

    Forget the bird and the frog, what about Tony the Tiger?

  • Chris Sobieniak

    This is really serious, having to read up on what also has transpired over the past years (no reason while children’s TV in this country is DEAD IMO). There’s no real fun in it anymore once these restrictions are in place, you might as well leave your kids home in the typical latchkey manner than to expose them to the “outside world” where they could be enticed because of what products they might want to beg their folks for (how I pretty much spent my childhood).

    This all made me think back to an educational film I saw back in junior high that effectively brought up the good/bad points of how products are marketed to children using live-action/animation involving a cereal called “Super Goop” or whatever. That was really good film for it’s time that I saw it in, but now it’s probably too irrelevant in today’s highly-conscious world. All I know is that I’m going to miss seeing those characters I grew up with.

    Again, thank you companies for finally giving in, thank you so goddamn much! :-(

  • http://animationwhoandwhere.blogspot.com/ Joe Campana

    This is idiotic! The marketing bozos are working overtime again! Why not make the cereals more healthy? …then they could keep the characters!!!

  • Kyle Maloney

    what? if true, that really sucks. I grew up watching commercials with sam and tony…it would be really weird without them on the box.

  • Chris

    This post seems to be overstating the point. All they’re doing is making the cereals healthier and promising not to sell ‘unhealthy’ cereals to kids under 12 using licensed characters. In practice, they’re going to reformulate all the cereals to satisfy the parental groups in question, and nothing else of any consequence is going to happen.

    (If the cereals still contain HFCS, it ain’t gonna make a difference, of course. They can put in all the whole grains they want, but it isn’t going to help.)

  • James Kormann

    Bummer. I hope that they keep using Tony the Tiger and Toucan Sam. They are classics!

  • matt

    My, how strange this didn’t happen BEFORE Shrek3 was plastered all over absolutely everything for the release date!! Talk about shutting the gate after the horse has bolted! I do remember the glow-in-the-dark patches we got in the 70s fondly though.

  • http://tomcatltd.com/ Tomcat

    Does this really mean that they’ll stop using their own characters, or only licensed like Shrek and Spongebob? Is there something different from Toucan Sam compared to Tony the Tiger and others? I wonder because this quote in the article:

    The advertising agreement does not apply to marketing characters Kellogg owns, like Tony the Tiger, but it does apply to characters the food company licenses, like the cartoon figure Shrek, said Susan Linn, co-founder of the Campaign For A Commercial-Free Childhood.

    Hopefully they don’t get rid of the characters. I’ve always liked them.

  • Sean D.

    I’ve also heard a rumor that Captain Crunch is being retired! This truly is the end of an era!

  • Pedro Fantabula

    I don’t find this a TRAVESTY as their hearts are in the right places, it won’t make that much of a difference. Kids will still be fat if their dietary intake isn’t monitored and don’t get enough excersize. Tv and vid games and web surfing are cool, but we are rearing a generation of couch potatoes, unhealthy ones at that.

  • http://www.carbonalley.com Jeff Koval

    One more example of overreaction because of a vocal minority, no doubt. Evidently Kellogg’s must protect us from ourselves, because we are too stupid to dictate what we and our families eat.

  • http://www.io.com/~o_m/omworld OM

    …All this started back in the 60′s when Peggy Charren and her ilk started trying to impose their pseudo-morality upon the rest of the world. If someone had simply stood up and told her that she if she didn’t want her kids watching cartoons and seeing commercials that urged their kids to bug her to death until she bought something she couldn’t afford, then all she had to do was be a *real* parent, turn off her own TV and tell her kids *NO!*. She had no business then trying to tell the world how they should raise their kids, especially since it’s obvious that she didn’t know how to raise her own.

  • http://stevemusgravedesigns.com/ Steve Musgrave

    This is America. There’s no such things as moderation or personal responsibility.

  • http://www.myspace.com/doctort13 Terrence Burke

    First Saturday morning cartoons, now the cereals that spawned “Saturday Morning” as we knew it. It’s a sad day for dentists.

  • uncle wayne

    I just hope they won’t get rid of THEIR OWN toonies (Tony, etc.)

  • http://www.flyingiguannaproductions.com Zee

    I grew up on cereal commercials. This is a shame. It is crazy to think that it is only the fault of the cereal companies that kids are fat these days. It’s a bunch of factors; they don’t get enough physical exercise, they sit in front of the TV and play video games rather than go out and play soccer or play tag in the park, funding in schools has been cut to the point where extracurricular programs have been cut. I don’t see any class action law suit against the video game industry for making kids fat.
    It’s too easy to point the blame in one place, the cereal companies, but they are not entirely to blame. What ever happened to personal responsibility? America, land of the law suits, home of the lawyer.
    There are a lot of small commercial houses that depend on the cereal commercials for work. This is going to hurt the animation industry. That sucks, because some of the best quality animation is in cereal commercials. We’ll see how many commercials get axed and how many will remain. My personal favorites have always been the Trix Rabbit and Snap, Crackle, Pop, Rice Krispies.

  • Bill Field

    Brewfans, Jerry and Amid, I posted as well on Animationshow.com, I direct commercials and online media for a lot of kid driven products, cereal being at the top of the list. I’m a tad worried about the income loss, but as some of you know, I’ve been trying to make the jump to series and features, but this could well affect those areas, too, but it may also help grow up the perception and viewership of animation here in the USA. I love advertising characters, I’ve created over 100 in my career, and collect everyone else’s schwag and premiums. I say we rebel– with sites, some animated shorts and strips–ANYTHING to paint the picture of how ridiculous this is. Don’t let these cereal “killers” win– remember Linus the Lionhearted and Post’s great cartoon shows? They went bye-bye after Peggy Charen attacked kidmedia in 1968, taking a lot of the fun out of Saturday mornings – I was only 6, but I remember the change from action shows all being replaced with comedy cartoons, and Linus, which was my favorite, disappearing overnite. It truly is a sad day in Mudville.

  • http://www.spiteyourface.com Tony Mines

    So if I took this opportunity to shamelessly plug that I just directed one of the first wave of these new ads, for what you colonials call Cocoa Krispies – would that be, like, totally bad for the kids or something?

  • http://www.aaronhazouri.com Aaron

    Actually, upon reading the article, Kellogg’s says they will no longer market to children unless a single serving of the product meets these standards, and then the article goes on to say “most cereals fall inside the calorie guideline.”

    I have a feeling Kellogg’s will simply re-formulate — or decrease the serving size — of their most popular cereals and continue the business as usual of marketing them to children… And maybe parents (as my parents did, and many others, I’m sure) should keep half an eye on the junk their kids are stuffing themselves with.

  • http://www.myspace.com/pmaxwellward Max Ward

    Toucan Sam has been lame for years now, so good riddance

  • Doug Drown

    I think it’s a shame, too. Children can be trained to eat sweets in moderation, or not at all, if parents so choose. (For example, we rarely had soda in the house when I was a kid except for ginger ale and, very occasionally, root beer or Pepsi. My parents weren’t in the habit of drinking soda, so as a result, I’ve never acquired much of a taste for it.)

    This is yet another instance of political (or, better, dietary) correctness. But it’s nothing new: remember that Post Super Golden Crisp used to be Super SUGAR Crisp and, before that, just plain Sugar Crisp. Sugar Bear is still around, but hardly anyone knows his name.

  • Chuck Rekow

    This isn’t bad news. If I’m reading the article right, Kellogg’s is voluntarily raising the standards of the products, so that anything with a cartoon character will actually be healthy for kids. It’s what all industries should do: make a good product,

    then sell, sell, sell!

  • http://www.scaredofbees.com Nathan

    Being an avid cereal enthusiast, I’ve kept a close eye on this one. From what I gather, as long as the cereal meets certain nutritional standards (less than 200 calories, less than 12 grams of sugar, etc.) they will still use characters to advertise. Sadly, cereals such as Fruit Loops, Cocoa Krispies, and the like do not meet these standards, so they may stop using cartoon characters to advertise. These characters are such a strong brand recognition tool though, I doubt they will discard them so easily. I foresee Kellogg’s reducing the sugar or whatever else is necessary in order to keep these characters around… at least I hope.

    Like Matt Hunter said, moderation and parental responsibility is the key. Why ruin something enjoyable for everyone because some parents can’t keep tally of what their kids or eating? I’ve got an 11 year old. It’s not that tough to say no.

  • http://zeppomarxist.livejournal.com Anthony Strand

    Wait, if they aren’t for children, who are they for? Have we really reached the point where the existence of sugared cereal is taboo?

  • http://www.laoxiong.com/donghuapian/ å…?费动画片

    maybe is a good news.

  • John A

    So, are they going to go back to selling cigarettes?

  • http://trevour.blogspot.com Trevour

    Didn’t General Mills do this already? They switched to all whole grain ingredients a few years ago, and they’re still using their line of characters (i.e. Trix Rabbit, Sonny, Lucky). I wonder if this is all Kellogg’s has in mind too.

  • Mr. Semaj

    Well, it’s comforting to know that the Kellogg’s mascots aren’t DISAPPEARING, but by not advertising them to children anymore, and giving in to parental groups still sucks some of the fun out of buying and eating cereal.

    I sent Kellogg’s a letter last February about how they’ve been lapsing on some of their cereal ads, and this could be one reason why. I still wish they’d bring back ads for Corn Flakes and Smacks. :(

  • david

    Who says cartoon characters can’t market healthier foods? No one has said anything about Snap Crackle and Pop, because Rice Krispies is one of the healthier cereals. or if is spreads to General Mills the Honey Nut Cheerios Honey be will still be okay.

    It doesn’t mean the end to these characters even with these current standards :

    Frosted Flakes would pass
    regular fruit loops and Smacks would be okay if they released reduced sugar versions

    like General Mills who’s cereals Cocoa Puffs Lucky Charms Cinnamon Toast Crunch and Trix would be okay if the standards where imposed on them.

    Cap’n Crunch would also be okay

    I don’t think the original cereals are under attack. it’s the newer versions like Marshmallow Blasted Fruit Loops Which is like 383 calories with 53 grams of sugar.

    calorie info from http://www.calorie-count.com

  • http://www.animationreplive.com Novid

    Well, im not surprised at all about this. My only question is now much money the three major cable networks and the last breed of saturday morning hold outs stand to lose?

    By the end of 2008, i expect that the anime dubbers and production arms buying more spots and more blocks for littery pennies on the dollar and they will do it too.

  • Steve K.

    Did anyone even read the article? Of course not!!

    ———–
    The company said it won’t promote foods in TV, radio, print or Web site ads that reach audiences at least half of whom are under age 12 UNLESS a single serving of the product meets these standards:

    -No more than 200 calories.
    -No trans fat and no more than 2 grams of saturated fat.
    -No more than 230 milligrams of sodium, except for Eggo frozen waffles.
    -No more than 12 grams of sugar, not counting sugar from fruit, dairy and vegetables.

    Kellogg’s said it would reformulate products to meet these criteria OR stop marketing them to children under 12 by the end of 2008.
    ————-

    Kellogg’s will reformulate their products making them healthier to meet the criteria listed. So what’s the big deal? Both kids AND adults getting a healthier product? It doesn’t mean it will taste any different. They can make anything taste like anything these days.

    Also, again, if you READ the article it states that only if they CANNOT meet the criteria, will they stop marketing to children. So look at it this way, if they make it healthier, they will continue marketing to kids with all of your favorite cereal characters – minus the movie/TV franchise tie in stuff (good IMHO). The old cereal characters are much more imaginative. If they can’t meet the criteria, nothing will change except the box.

  • http://vice.parodius.com/ Dave Silva

    … They’ll NEVER take away my Lucky Charms, though. I won’t let ‘em!

  • Tory

    This is bad as I would hate to lose the classics and the odd chance of a new film based cereal tasting good. This is also bad as the quality of sweetness, flavour and texture in cereals is going to heck. Frosted Flakes now taste like Corn Flakes used to, I can’t see any frostings in these small puny flakes. Please some one bring back super sugar coated cereals. I would hate for my children to growup in a world like this yet here it is. Our kids NEED more Sugar. Be brave cereal companies, embrace what you are and revel in it.

    In the least they could market classic formula cereals with classic icon characters as they were originally designed on the cover of the box in blacked out protective bags sold behind the counter to those with valid ids showing they are over 21.

  • http://itsthecat.com Mark Kausler

    What we need is some great NEW mascots on HEALTHY cereals at REASONABLE prices! I can not afford five bucks for a box of cereal, when I was a kid, a box of cereal was thirty-five cents. Store brands and Trader Joes still have cereal for under three dollars, a bargain nowadays. I would love to see a real cranky, cantankerous old Irish character (Leprechaun or a Pookah, maybe) on the label of McCann’s Irish Oatmeal, best cereal on the market today. It would be fun to create some new commercials with the mean old Irish guy forcing some brat kids to eat some WHOLE GRAIN cereal for a change, and chuck all that five dollar sugary junk in the garbage!

  • http://niffiwan.livejournal.com/ Esn

    Um, so can anyone tell me why advertising to children is a good thing in any case? The rationale for allowing advertising at all is, in theory, to allow people to find out about a company’s product. Not to brainwash them into buying it. An ideal marketplace is one where different products compete with each other on the strength of their own merits.

    Many of you have perhaps noted that the older the target audience is for a certain commercial, the more realistic and useful that commercial is. For example, commercials for those bathtubs for older people pretty much describe the actual product, while commercials for (to use an example) cereals say almost nothing about the actual product and rely on colourful characters to con the young target audience into buying it. Why don’t they use the same technique for older audiences? Because they know that it won’t work; only young people are impressionable enough to get swept up into the hype and spend cash just because of some flashy graphics.

    So how is allowing advertising aimed at children a good thing for a society? Do you really think that, in the absence of corporate-created “fun characters”, new ones will not take their place, perhaps created by someone not bent on selling merchandise? Why is it a good thing to allow corporate mascots to be children’s icons?

  • http://davidmcg.net/ DavidMcG

    People in this thread are acting like Kellogg’s just shot Santa Claus.
    Maybe going in a new direction for the first time in 60 years will be a good thing.

  • http://jorgegarrido2.blogspot.com Jorge Garrido

    And capitalism is undermined in America once again by the culture of victimhood.

    I agree with Max that Toucan and Tony have sucked for years, but they could have redone him in a retro style like what Craig Kellman and others treid a few years back. *sigh*

  • Christine

    Let me put my two cents in as a Mom of two small kiddos. I for one am glad they’re getting rid of all of the promos on the cereal boxes…you don’t know how many times I see kids in the cereal aisle want a bog box of sugar-coated-styrofoam-tastin’-pop-o’s merely because the latest poorly drawn ‘toon is on them. My daughter saw the Spongebob-labeled carrots in the produce section and *begged* me to buy them. Yes, begged me for carrots!

    The Kellogg’s agreement says that each serving has to have no more than 200 calories, No more than zero grams of trans fat and no more than 2 grams of saturated fat, No more than 230 milligrams of sodium (except for Eggo frozen waffles), and No more than 12 grams of sugar (excluding sugar from fruit, dairy, and vegetables). If you look at the nutrition info for something like Fruit Loops, it passes all of these except for the sugar (it has 14g). I think that they’ll tweak most of their cereals so they fit the rules.

    However, I am sad that they’ll probably also tweak the commercials so that they’re aimed more at teens. Out go the cartoons!

  • Chris Sobieniak

    Zee said
    > I grew up on cereal commercials. This is a shame. It is crazy to think that it is only the fault of the cereal companies that kids are fat these days. It’s a bunch of factors; they don’t get enough physical exercise, they sit in front of the TV and play video games rather than go out and play soccer or play tag in the park, funding in schools has been cut to the point where extracurricular programs have been cut. I don’t see any class action law suit against the video game industry for making kids fat.

    This is what often makes me laugh when I think of issues like this. Whilst these guys try their best to pretty much create one big PSA campaign for the entire country through stunts like this, more and more schools are losing physical education due to their levies not passing. It just hypocritical and an oxymoron to expect everyone to get their act together.

    > It’s too easy to point the blame in one place, the cereal companies, but they are not entirely to blame. What ever happened to personal responsibility? America, land of the law suits, home of the lawyer.

    That’s so sadly true.

    Of course, I had a lot more to say about this before I read some of the other comments here, and yes, some of us probably overreacted a little. I just have to hope this isn’t the precursor to what could happen if the Committee for a Commercial-Free Childhood had their way (assuming whatever motives they’ve got as the ultimatum). :-)

    Still, I can remember the days when “Sugar” was proudly listed on the front of a cereal box as part of the name itself, yet I didn’t think it was all that bad (does this mean the “free toy inside” gimmicks are out the window anyway). Reading that article, I couldn’t help but noticed you don’t really see hardly any ads for Nabsico/Kool-Aid products much now, and it’s only a shame if they had to curb on that. I’ll miss those clever jingles and tastes I had back when Kool-Aid Man saved the day!

  • Anastasia Lee

    Big Brother save me. I’ve become addicted to Cartoon Brew.

  • Robert Schaad

    I rarely buy any cereals nowadays due to the price. Not worth it! As a kid though, in the 60′s and 70′s I consumed many boxes of cereal (Rice Honeys, Wheat Honeys, etc.) solely to get the premiums (worth it!). If Kellogg’s does indeed decide to retire the toon characters…that would be a shame. This seems to be equating the toon characters selling (sweetened) cereals to the Joe Camel controversy from a few years ago. Fred and Barney stopped shilling for the tobacco companies years ago!!
    If this does happen, we can all take solace in books like Krazy Kids’ Food.
    This reminds me of the Odd Couple episode in which Felix Unger redesigns a chewing gum line to introduce adult flavors…and have opera stars trading cards…

  • Russell H

    Well, this sort of thing has been creeping up for years. I can’t remember exactly when, but suddenly, “Sugar Frosted Flakes” became “Frosted Flakes,” “Sugar Smacks” became ‘Honey Smacks,” and “Sugar Pops” became “Golden Pops.” Mustn’t let the children even *see* “The S-Word.”

  • http://gagaman.blogspot.com GagaMan

    A ban just like this one was set in the UK just last year, and already children’s television revenue has been hit like a ton of bricks because, funnily enough, sweet fatty foods were a big percentage of what pays for children’s TV. They could always just start advertising healthier food with the same characters, or continue to try and reduce the sugar and fats in these food products while keeping the fun taste. Just flat out banning cartoon characters advertising food is not the solution.

    Mind you, I’m not exactly gonna miss seeing Shrek and his nasty teeth stuck on the front of my cereal.

  • Graham

    Thank you, God! Frooty Loops commercials have gotten very annoying since Sam’s illegitimate nephews arrived. Those commercials were best when he was just alone. I’ll still miss him, though, for nostalgia’s sake. :(

    The recent Apple Jacks commercials were also irritating. Remember the old “they don’t taste like apples” formula? What was so wrong with it that they had to replace it with a talking apple and cinnamon stick?

  • http://classicanimation.blogspot.com Thad Komorowski

    Kind of sad how low society has sunk when we get emotional over Toucan Sam and Tony the Tiger.

  • Mike Russo

    This country can go to hell. Seriously.

  • http://niffiwan.livejournal.com/ Esn

    Thad – yeah, that’s kinda what I was getting at in my post.
    You summed it up much more succintly, though.

  • Smurfberries

    You can tell when they change the formula. Peanut Butter Crunch lost its taste a while back. Sugar Pops (or Corn Pops, or whatever its called these days) now taste like $h!+ !

  • Chris Sobieniak

    Robert Schaad said: This seems to be equating the toon characters selling (sweetened) cereals to the Joe Camel controversy from a few years ago. Fred and Barney stopped shilling for the tobacco companies years ago!!

    Being reminded of the Hamm’s Beer bear too!

    GagaMan said: A ban just like this one was set in the UK just last year, and already children’s television revenue has been hit like a ton of bricks because, funnily enough, sweet fatty foods were a big percentage of what pays for children’s TV. They could always just start advertising healthier food with the same characters, or continue to try and reduce the sugar and fats in these food products while keeping the fun taste. Just flat out banning cartoon characters advertising food is not the solution.

    Would bug me if the taste gets screwed because of this over here. Funny seeing how it went down in the UK.

    > Mind you, I’m not exactly gonna miss seeing Shrek and his nasty teeth stuck on the front of my cereal.

    That’s true. The whole tie-in thing really should stop!

  • Matt Crowther

    The end of an era- my father, Duane Crowther, was involved in probably hundreds of cereal commercials over the years, both as a free-lancer in the 60s and when he co-owned Duck Soup in the 70s and 80s. He animated almost every character from Cap’n Crunch to Tony the Tiger to Quisp and Quake to Toucan Sam. So this announcement leaves me feeling a bit sad.

  • Brandon Pierce

    Kind of sad how low society has sunk when we get emotional over Toucan Sam and Tony the Tiger.

    Or Joe Camel…. or characters from South Park. List goes on.

  • purin

    Oh, horror! A possible disappearing of advertising mascots!

    The fact of the matter is that kids don’t have much knowledge or common sense. They do speak cartoon, though, and they stick like glue to the very basic tastes that appeal to humans (like “sugar for quick energy!”).

    And, come on, the cereals have been also trying to peg themselves as healthy for years? Hello, it’s a breakfast cereal (why the hell would anyone think to eat something not good for you for breakfast), and it’s from companies that had their start during a health craze (like shredded wheat and corn flakes). Back then, people took the ads more seriously. Later, they started stressing how the cereal had to be “part of a complete breakfast.” They knew it was bad.

    And of course “healthy” versions of previously unhealthy things never taste as good. You have to have a complete makeover, but I doubt anything will taste as good as the “kid” food that is always worse for you, which parents give their kids with nostalgia out of a sense of “keeping it real” or something. Besides, if we’re supposed to be so moderate or abstinent regarding these cereals… then why is it “part of a complete breakfast” and not a snack? It’s really rotten.

    Look, we may look back on these guys because we grew up with them as a nation and they are a part of our culture and there’s a lot of history of style and animation in them, but it’s not like these guys ever REALLY did us any good. Are we really better people because of the ADS we saw when we grow up and the jingles we remembered like obedient little slaves?

    (And Morgan Spurlock didn’t MAKE McDonald’s get rid of Super Size. They did that on their own)

  • http://kitschensyngk.deviantart.com/ Kitschensyngk

    All for the sole cause of protecting America’s youth from the evil white powdery menace known as…

    sugar.

  • http://cartoongeeks.blogspot.com/ S. Michelle Klein-Hass

    What people don’t remember is that the sugary cereals from the ’70s sucked too. Why did kids bug their parents for the cereal because of the prize inside, then ignore the cereal once they fished out the prize? Because the cereal SUCKED. Pink Panther Flakes? Count Chocula? Frankenberry? Froot Loops? Apple Jacks? They suck.

    The only cereals that I remember absolutely loving as a kid are Quaker Granola and Frosted Mini-Wheats. Mmmmm. I still eat them the way I did as a kid. Right out of the box. No hassling with bowls and milk.

    Looks like Tom Reed is going to have to rework Presweetened Playhouse to be a wake for the kiddy cereals.

  • http://drgrantz.deviantart.com/ revned

    Ironic that I just saw boxes of Kellogg’s Disney Princesses, Mickey’s Playhouse, and Little Einsteins cereals at Walgreen’s. They were marked down to five bucks for two boxes. Maybe I should buy the lot of ‘em and resell them on eBay for a fortune.

  • G

    Sounds like alot of people are overreacting.

    Just read the article. Take in all the information. Companies like Kellogg’s, have invested many billions of dollars into their characters. They’ll reformulate because they can. Because they have to. The characters will promote healthier versions of the food were familiar with from our childhood. The kids of tomorrow won’t know the difference and maybe they’ll be healthier for it.

    End of story. Tony, Sam, Snap Crackle and Pop are not dead, just living a more responsible life.

    I don’t know how people can comment without reading the comments they follow. React to all the information, not to some fear inspired headline.

  • Chris Sobieniak

    S. Michelle Klein-Hass said:
    > What people don’t remember is that the sugary cereals from the ’70s sucked too. The only cereals that I remember absolutely loving as a kid are Quaker Granola and Frosted Mini-Wheats. Mmmmm. I still eat them the way I did as a kid. Right out of the box. No hassling with bowls and milk.

    I guess I have a sweet tooth them for the sugary cereals I loved (Froot Loops, Apple Jacks, Trix, etc.). I couldn’t stand eating Corn Flakes or Cherrios much. Rice Krispies was OK, but often I found putting extra sugar on Life and let it get a tad soggy filled me up quite well!

  • Samos3

    >>> but I LOVE this all Modern Big Brother Ultra-PC nannyism.

    I support it because this country deserves it. They deserve amnesty handed to 20 million unskilled, poor workers who, despite the rosy predictions of the idiotlogues, will not magically transform into happy taxpayers. I hope the next Administration signs every anti global warming treaty and sends our economy into the crapper. I hope the Hillary/Obama ticket wins the White House and nationalizes everything, including animation.

    Yes! Animators whose only jobs are federally run toon factories that produce propaganda pieces and live action versions of classic Disney characters. Mickey Gets His Groove On! Word, bitch! The G-Man is your homie, baby!

    Mwah ha ha ha haaaaaaa!

    Oh, and the best cereal in history in peanut butter Captain Crunch.

  • Bill Field

    Go ahead, laugh. There is an indisputable ink between experimental, groundbreaking animation, incredible character design, an ever evolving medium AND cereal. This is more than handwriting on the wall, it’s an HD-TV monitor running an Emergency Broadcasting Alert, it’s so clear.It’s not a good thing– it just gives folks one less reason to take responsibility for their own actions. Animation will SUFFER from this, not GROW. I’m mortified that several mavens of the cartoon world are in this thread talking about the taste of 70′s cereal, while an entire cottage industry circles the drain–WAKE UP AND SMELL THE FROSTED FLAKES.

  • purin

    Mascots and clever advertising aren’t necessarily bad. I’m still skeptical about the whole need to get rid of Joe Camel. However, aggressive campaigning towards children is a little… rotten. Have you ever tried to keep something away from a kid who’s been successfully advertised to? Even if you manage to, he’ll be obsessed with it. As a kid, would you eat store brand with its bootleg mascots?

    Also, look at how high the budgets are now! I think it deserves at least a toning down. I’d love to see the same budgets and advertsing apply to cereals kids normally wouldn’t want to buy and see if it works on them. I wonder if kids would beg for mini wheats if they had a cute mascots and toys (yes, TOYS) inside.

    Besides, I’m sure the animation industry will adapt.

    (Oh, yeah. Who else here has a childhood memory of getting a box of lucky charms, opening up and finding these weird little colored cardboardy things and wondering where all the marshmallows were?)

  • Tory

    Purin says:

    “I wonder if kids would beg for mini wheats if they had a cute mascots”

    This ain’t cute?

    http://www.mini-wheats.com/index.shtml

  • http://www.spiteyourface.com Tony Mines

    Jebus!

    When I posted my comment, it looked set to be second. Now it’s somewhere hidden amongst 76 paragraphs of craziness!

    So anyway. I directed this new Kellogg commercial yeah? And it’s still got the monkey in it yeah? So everyone calm the heck down.

    http://chillibean.net/perl/reels-9.7.pl?xhtml=IGPTTMXM&%3bT=WL

  • Hooper

    Incredible commercial, Tony! Thanks.

  • http://www.jackmcgurk.com johnny the crazy guy

    i especially like the ones over @ http://www.jackmcgurk.com