Job Offer of the Week: Make 500 Shorts in 90 Days

I don’t know if this is a real offer, but it’s a classic. Somebody wants twenty-five hours, yes, HOURS, of animation produced in two to three months. On top of that, they’re offering between $7-10/per minute of animation. I hope some of our readers apply for the job and have some fun with these goofballs. Here’s the listing:

We are looking for a Flash Animator to finish a project for 500 of Flash short films; each film is about 2~3 minutes long. The films are about lovely & cute characters’ cartoon. Pay $20 / per film, which is 500 films x $20 = $10,000. Please submit your Flash art works for the consideration. Thanks.

City,State: New York, NY
Salary: $10,000
Duration: 2-3 months


  • Cameron Koller

    “The films are about lovely & cute characters’ cartoon.”

    That punctuation typo liberates animators to create completely disgusting and unappealing cartoons that are watched BY cute cartoon characters.

    Must. Exploit.

  • fishmorgjp

    Gawrsh, here it is — muh big break!!!!

  • http://thadkomorowski.com Thad

    I’m sure somebody posted that intending it would end up here.

  • http://www.pitchbibles.blogspot.com Steve Schnier

    Oh where do I begin?

    I wonder if these are the same people from India who wanted me to create a TV series and write all 26 episodes – and then AFTER its produced, they’d decide if they like my work enough to consider paying me?

    If not then they’re certainly blood relatives.

  • http://jessicaplummer.blogspot.com Jessica Plummer

    Oh yes, they did the math on the pay, but the actual production? What is this…given the best scenario of three months (approx 90 days) and making all of the 500 shorts (approx 2.5 minutes long) – that’s creating 20.8 hours of animation – you get the joy of making almost 14 minutes of animation A DAY…with no days off. That’s making 5-6 shorts a day. That’s assuming all of their content is all created and ready to go with no need of additional art (doubtful), and audio, editing, etc are already taken care of.

    The biggest crunch I did was 21 minutes of animation in three months…with a team of 12-20 people.

    I like the kicker that this is work for NYC.

  • http://anthonylamberty.com Anthony

    I went so far as to make an account where they posted this job just so I could contact them and find out how serious they are. Unfortunately to contact them you have to pay a subscription fee. I guess these morons are looking for an animator that has an extra 10 bucks a month to spend looking for great opportunities like this one.

  • Sam

    I like how they make the project sound big with the $10k offer, but for 500 short films, which is 16 hours to 25 hours worth of animation. That’s longer than your average feature film, needless to say TV shows that runs between 20 minutes to 40 minutes long.

    I know what I could give them! Characters looping for 3 minutes! But even with 500 of it it’s a lot of cycles one has got to do.

  • http://www.frankpanucci.com FP

    There are too many of these things online. Whenever I fall into a rare discussion with people who post such jobs, I use the Roto-Rooter analogy:
    “Roto Rooter charges $95 to show up for a half-hour to possibly fix your drain. Creating animation is more difficult than running an electric snake, but let’s say the two jobs are worth equal pay. Your simple cartoon will take eighteen ten-hour days to produce. Thus, you should expect to pay a price closer to $35000 than the $200 you mention”.
    and then they say
    “I am in Bombfukistan. What for this ‘drain’ you speak?”

    • http://www.pitchbibles.blogspot.com Steve Schnier

      “I am in Bombfukistan.”

      Ah, so they ARE my clients…

  • Ryan

    Kids like repetition, right? Each episode will be a different edit of the same footage. There is a 45 second transformation sequence in the middle of each episode.

    • Ryan

      The transformation sequence is just using “shape tween.”

    • Chris Sobieniak

      Yeah you could probably cut corners this way if you made it obvious there would be a recyclec OP/ED sequence or something. Someone could pull off something like “La Linea” this way if it meant coming up with a new scenario for the middle.

  • http://bensvideogamereviews.blogspot.com/ Ben

    Somebody needs to show them the “Missing Missy” lost cat email exchange. Sometimes people have a totally unrealistic expectation for work requests…

    http://www.27bslash6.com/missy.html

  • Roberto Severino

    This seriously must be a joke. Not even the original Hanna-Barbera studio or Filmation, regardless of its cost-cutting techniques, could even meet this ridiculous demand. It just can’t be done, not in the Golden Age, and certainly not now. Who do they think they’re fooling? Pathetic.

  • http://www.onanimation.com Daniel Caylor

    That’s actually a really good deal…if you’re an idiot.

  • http://www.flashcartoons.org Lavalle Lee (flashcartoons.org)

    These kind of job ads remind of of that famous quote,

    “How you would you like to suck my balls, Mr. Garrison” – Cartman

    Is what I would say to someone offering me this nonsense.

  • Solaris

    Not possible. Sorry.

  • http://www.sexymecha.com Hal

    BREAKDOWN:
    if there’s about 22 workdays a month (no weekends) that means you’d need to average 7-8 shorts a day to meet it. That means producing 14-24 minutes of animation a day. That also means raking in $140-$160 a day. Even the shittiest Flash shorts tweening shapes around takes more than an hour or two for around a minute of content.

    So you’re making $800 a week if you’re lucky… good luck whatever student takes the bait fresh out of school!

  • cliffclaven

    All I can think of is J. Wellington Wimpy’s generous invitations to a duck dinner, always ending in “You bring the duck.”

  • http://justforspite.blogspot.com Gene Hole

    I’ll bite- how’s about if I just loop a single 16x walk cycle for each 3 minute short? something like this?
    http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=533152237978&comments=

    • http://jessicaplummer.blogspot.com Jessica Plummer

      Only if they use that music track. That’s fantastic.

  • Totally Legit

    Dear Prospective Employer,

    Please deposit the promised amount of $10,000 in a brown paper bag in unmarked bills and drop off at the blue trash can on the corner of 8th Street and Bedford Avenue prior to commencing project by midnight Thursday. Further instructions will follow. Thank you for your consideration.

  • http://www.jpdj.com JPDJ

    Seriously, where do these people come from?

  • Charles Carney

    The producer says it’s a three-camera set up. Just kidding. But not by much.

  • Simon

    Isn’t this just for the new Looney Toons show?

  • http://highlyrecommended.blogspot.com Satorical

    Everybody Loves Hypnotoad must be shopping around.

  • Terry Walsh

    Many, many years ago when I was on a layoff; I placed an ad in “The Hollywood Reporter” offering my services as an animator & storyboard artist. I received one phone call from a guy who said he was from the Philippines and in LA looking to connect up with animation talent for a project he was producing. He gave no details as to what this “project” was about.

    When I asked him where his offices were he told me that he didn’t have an office but wanted to meet me at a coffee shop.

    End of phone call end of story.

  • http://cartoonlandanimation.com Kevin C.

    This type of ad is very common on oDesk and Elance, two large on-line job boards, where you are competing with people who will work for 3.00 an hour.

    • http://monicochavez.com Monico Chavez

      Yeah. Stopped using those sites when I was getting crazily underbid for full page illustrations. Some were 30-50 bucks. Insane.

  • Demetre

    I don’t think this is a classic ad, I think its legendary.I say frame it and lock it up in the cartoon brew vault and then release in 25 year intervals so that future generations can gaze into the unsightly past and marvel at the idea of 20 dollars an hour.