South African Animated Film To Close Durban International Film Festival

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCvhOL4clvM

A South African 3D animation, Adventures in Zambezia, has been selected as the closing film for the 33rd Durban International Film Festival.

The festival, which runs from 19 to 29 July, with principal funding by the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund, will present Adventures in Zambezia on 28 July, immediately following the festival Award evening.

Adventures in Zambezia is a landmark in the history of the South African animation. With a truly African story, world-class 3D animation and an all-star voicing cast that includes names like Samuel L. Jackson and Abigail Breslin, the film is destined for success on a global scale.

Director Wayne Thornhill at Triggerfish Studios in Cape Town says: “This coming of age story was a coming of age for the whole crew, and dare I say, South African animation. Over three gruelling years, it turned many young, talented people into talented veterans of the industry. I am exceptionally proud to present their work to the world. I think it is of a quality not seen before in South African animation, and that it points to a bright future for a small industry that can punch well above its weight.”

The film relates the inspiring tale of an intrepid young falcon, Kai, who seeks out a rumoured bird city called Zambezia, where he hopes to find personal prestige as a talented flyer. But his competitive individualist ways must give way to working together with his fellow feathered friends in order to save the whole community.  The film moves away from the predictable narrative of many international animated children’s films, towards an entirely fresh, distinctively African structure. While on the one hand this is Kai’s story, on the other it is a story about an entire nation – a story of ubuntu.

Adventures in Zambezia
will have its world premiere at the festival, and its uplifting message that a spirit of togetherness will allow us to flourish is an entirely appropriate way to close South Africa’s largest and longest-running film festival.