“Frozen” Jumps to Second Place In Its 10th Weekend

Boosted in part by a sing-along version that was released into theaters, Disney’s Frozen jumped back into second place this weekend, an amazing feat for a film in its 10th weekend of wide release. The film’s estimated haul of $9.3 million raised its domestic total to $360M.

Frozen also grossed $24M abroad for an international total of $504.4M. The film’s $864.4M global gross has now surpassed The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, and with openings in China and Japan yet to come, will likely overtake Despicable Me 2′s $970.1M gross to become the second-highest grossing release of 2013.

In its third weekend, The Nut Job earned $7.6M (est.) lifting its total to $50.2M. In a few days, The Nut Job will surpass Liam Neeson-starring The Grey to become the highest-grossing film released by Open Road Films, the young distribution company launched by AMC Theatres and Regal Entertainment Group. It’s safe to say that Open Road will be releasing more family animation in the future.

Next weekend, both films should take a hit at the U.S. box office with the opening of the hotly-anticipated family film The Lego Movie directed by Chris Miller and Phil Lord.


  • Caitlin Cadieux

    So excited to see Frozen doing so well. It definitely deserves it. WDAS has been in absolute top form for a while now.

  • Austin Papageorge

    This is remarkable. That’s an even higher total than last week. The only comparable streaks for a November release are Home Alone, Mrs. Doubtfire, and Aladdin.

    • Austin Papageorge

      I should add a correction. The estimates for the weekend of January 31-February 2 were a bit high. The actual total was $8.9 million, which is still remarkable.

  • SarahJesness

    Impressive! Even though it doesn’t really have much competition, it’s still a big surprise to see the movie do so well.

  • George Comerci

    I’ve seen it four times and counting!!! And I loved the sing along! I went with my friends and we sang the loudest :D

  • Roberto Severino

    Astounding what a phenomenon this movie has become. I can only see it doing even better in the next coming weeks.

  • Ty

    I just don’t the love for this film. This is the first film Disney Animation has put out since John took over that I didn’t care for. I wish this success happened to Wreck-It Ralpn.

  • Toonio

    Guess everybody want’s to let it go and escape. Pretty crappy times we are having.

  • Barrett

    I suspect this has more to do with there being almost NOTHING for kids in theaters right now, it’s all Oscar bait and crass comedies for teens/adults. The Nut Job is the only other animated film out, and it’s doing pretty well for something with no established brand that isn’t from Disney, Dreamworks or Blue Sky. Families are desperate for something to go see, and I’m sure a fair amount of them want to see Frozen again. I just wish Wreck-It Ralph had maintained this kind of staying power, not that it was a disappointment or anything. I am just a lot more excited about the idea of a Wreck-It Ralph 2 than I am about more Frozen or Frozen-like films.

  • Alan

    It’s a beautiful film, but I *personally* didn’t like it for a few reasons. I didn’t hate it, but I don’t like it either, that sort of thing.

    I loved the environments, they were well designed and well rendered and they were consistent with their theme and I really liked the colour theme and fabrics.

    What I didn’t like was how over-animated the characters were, especially during the musicals, yet at the same time seeming to emit almost no life.

    The worst part are the eyes, they are terrible and I hope Disney tries something different next time. They are dead looking, like a doll. And actually one of my earliest opinions was, ‘it looks like they designed the merchandise first then did the animation second’ before I had even seen the film. The only time they are able to convey emotion properly was with the aid of audio ques or really, really strong poses or body language.

    I’m someone who still studies animation, compared to the likes of Tarzan or Treasure Planet, Frozen is missing all those subtle touches to the characters from the animators. Both of those films are as interesting to watch in mute as they are normally.

    Prefer Tangled, Wreck-it Ralph or even Hotel Transylvania on a technical aspect, and since that’s all I am giving my opinion on I’ll end it there. Worth a watch, wish it all the success, I just don’t consider it technically inspirational at all this time, definitely not one I would use to study from for example.

    Perhaps a great, appealing product but somewhat a mediocre artwork to sum up my opinion?

    • Strong Enough

      here we go. why do people insist on writing essays on movies they DIDN’T like.

  • EscoDingo

    Yeah, I definitely went to the sing-along this weekend with some friends. This makes it my 4th time in theaters? These parents in front of us kept eagerly looking at their two kids whenever the songs started, and the kids were really shy. They then gestured to myself and my friends behind them as we were belting out the lyrics we had already memorized going, “See? They’re singing, you should join them!” And the kids started singing, quietly. So cute.

  • Strong Enough

    you can have an opinion but people really go hard for things they hate instead of praising movies they love

    • http://the-animatorium.blogspot.com/ Natalie Belton

      Depends on how negative the person is I suppose..

  • http://www.myfconline.com/Delilah_ Feathermay

    This masterpiece of a film is just one more in the long line of Disney masterpieces, and well deserves its continuing phenomenal success. Who could *not* love it?! Of course, I’m one who has always adored musicals and classic Disney films, but Frozen just delivered so brilliantly in every way. I couldn’t stop thinking about it. I’ve seen it twice now, and committed the soundtrack to memory. On the second viewing (yesterday), I realized just how well the entire film had etched itself into my mind. There were very, very few things I didn’t remember from the first time–yet it all affected me in the same powerful ways, as if I hadn’t seen it already!