Drawing The Sailor

grillosailorman.jpg

Our buddy Oscar Grillo (above) writes about his latest exhibit of drawings and paintings inspired by a certain spinach eating sailor-man. Drawing The Sailor was part of Animacor ‘07, an international animation festival in Cordoba, Spain held last week. Grillo has posted a photo report on his blog.


popeyetrapezead1.jpgClick on this image at right to see a full-size newspaper ad from March 16th 1934 (a Friday), promoting the the first-run release of George White’s Scandals. This Fox film shared the bill with the latest Paramount Popeye cartoon, The Man On the Flying Trapeze, which was released the same day. This rare original newspaper ad demonstrates that block booking was not always in practice during the golden age – that a cartoon from one studio could (and often did) play with a feature from another studio.


While we’re at it, here’s one more plug for Bob Jaques’ excellent new blog which studies the great Popeye animators from the Fleischer era. He’s updating it regularly and posting a lot of good information – go here often: Popeye Animator ID.


  • http://blog.marcdeckter.com/ Marc Deckter

    If only I lived in Spain! That Grillo Popeye exhibit looks amazing – I wish I could have attended.

    It’s great reading news about our favorite one-eyed sailor-man so often!

  • Bryan

    Recalling the stove gag in Popeye’s “Can You Take It” after seeing that one of the songs in “Scandals” was “You Nasty Man”.

  • top cat james

    That’s Oscar Grillo in the photo? I thought it was Buck Henry.

  • Chris Smigliano

    From the exhibit page:
    The Palacio de la Merced will be the venue for an exhibition specially put together by Oscar Grillo for Animacor’07. “Drawing the Sailor Man� is this artist’s view of the famous character invented by Max Fleischer

    Let’s get it right, folks..ELISE SEGAR invented the character. Fleischer may have developed/adapted the animated version, But the sailor wouldn’t have been here at all if not for Segar

  • Oscar Grillo

    Mr policeman of small distractions, the name was ELZIE.

  • Chuck R.

    Good catch, Chris.

    With all respect, Mr. Grillo, getting the creator’s name wrong for such a celebrated cartoon character is more than a minor slip-up.

    Your work looks fantastic though, and the gallery space is incredible. That diamond-tiled floor would be a lot of competition most types of art, but goes quite nicley with the piece pictured above. I wish I could see the whole thing.

  • Chris Smigliano

    My apologies, Mr. Grillo. apparently I type faster than my Brain does. I meant no respect to your and your exhibit .
    As they say, “Close, but no Segar”

  • Chris Smigliano

    I did it again. I meant to say I meant no DISrespect…again, sorry.

  • http://www.nbcchimes.info Michael Shoshani

    Jerry writes: “This rare original newspaper ad demonstrates that block booking was not always in practice during the golden age – that a cartoon from one studio could (and often did) play with a feature from another studio.”

    And, I might add, in a theater owned by yet ANOTHER studio. Fox feature + Paramount short playing in a Loew’s (M-G-M) theater!