Interactive Animated Wall Projections

Karolina Sobecka

“Chase” is an art project from 2005 that I only heard about recently. In it, animated cartoon characters participate in a never-ending chase in which their speed and actions correspond to the speed of a moving car. It’s a modest experiment but I could see the idea being applied to more interesting and ambitious marriages of interactivity and animation in real-world environments. The artist, Karolina Sobecka, offers the following artistic statement about the work:

Danger, violence, fear, persecution are popular themes driving the children’s cartoons. Such infantilized representation of these concepts stands in absurd contrast to the stark reality of the urban LA context.


  • red pill junkie

    Not bad, although it would have been much more interesting if they had filmed it when people were still walking on the streets, to see their reactions—I guess they tried to avoid any possible confrontations with the police?

    And frankly, I can’t wait to see this technology being used in an animation project.

  • Chuck R.

    She has some great work in her demo reel, which makes it all the more perplexing that she would write such a pretentious artistic statement —one that disparages artists who really studied every aspect of movement and timing, and worked hard to present motion in all types of wild graphic interpretations. Whether she cares to admit it or not, cartoon animators paved the way for much of her work.

  • Anton G.

    Good concept, fairly well executed despite being low-tech. But why indeed dump on animation when it’s buttering her bread and enabling her vision? The commercial art not measuring up to fine art argument died the day performance art came in.

  • Chris Hatfield

    “And frankly, I can’t wait to see this technology being used in an animation project”

    You can do it yourself. Don’t wait. Its based on the peppers ghost illusion. Its not the completed to do and build, with a prrojector.

  • Oscar Grillo

    “Danger, violence, fear, persecution are popular themes driving the children’s cartoons. Such infantilized representation of these concepts stands in absurd contrast to the stark reality of the urban LA context.”

    The French poet and filmaker Jacques Prevert wrote: “Don’t give matches to intellectuals because they burn their fingers with them”

  • Rhett Wickham

    This basic concept was applied to the walls of the old RR subway line tunnels in Brooklyn back in the 80′s. The images were abstract and fun and I don’t know if they’re still there, or who did them. I always thought it was a great idea and that there should have been more of them. I haven’t been on that line for a decade, but the artwork was still in place back in 1997. Does anyone in NYC know what I’m referring to?

  • Chris L

    I don’t think she’s dumping on animation.

    Are you suggesting that the way that cartoons deal with “danger, violence, fear, and persecution” is mature or complex? Describing something as simplistic isn’t bashing it, if it’s a fact. Simplistic (or “infantilized”) isn’t always a bad thing, either.

    I’ll grant that her language is a little forced and artspeaky, but the basic idea makes perfect sense.

  • Adam

    Am I the first to note these are Preston Blair swipes?

  • Annie Sweetie Oakley

    can someone explain to me how this is done???

  • Chuck R.

    “Are you suggesting that the way that cartoons deal with “danger, violence, fear, and persecution” is mature or complex?”

    Chris, This piece is mainly about movement, and yes I do believe the way that movement is depicted in cartoons is sophisticated, despite it’s modest intent as broad comedic entertainment. From split-second timing to proper cutting, and even the graphic motion “blurs” in classic Looney Tunes, there’s a great deal of thought and evolution both graphically and cinematically.

    I’ll give her the benefit of the doubt and assume she’s not intentionally “dumping” on animation artists. Maybe the “Chase” piece is just a lark or even a quickly hashed out tribute to Preston Blair. (yes, Adam, I noticed!) But the artistic statement puts a damper on the fun by overreaching. I’ll accept the concept that cartoons don’t resemble urban blight. Do we need people to spell that out for us? As a substitute for “infanticized” or “simplistic” (which is also demeaning), I would have accepted simplified, surreal, exaggerated, ludicrous and even silly. That’s what cartoons unapologetically are. But she almost treats cartoons like they are a failed attempt to answer some higher calling to depict violence as it is.
    That shows a lack of appreciation and understanding.