Automania 2000 and Pan-Tele-Tron

YouTuber Phil Gray, who uploaded this rare Tex Avery documentary a while back, has posted more difficult-to-find pieces of animation online: the British animated shorts Automania 2000 (1963) and Pan-Tele-Tron (1957). As films, Automania is clearly the stronger of the two and the only one which I can recommend, but there are some fun design elements in the industrial short Pan-Tele-Tron which might make it worth a glance as well.

Automania 2000 (1963)
studio: Halas & Batchelor
directed by John Halas

Pan-Tele-Tron (1957)
A Pearl & Dean Production
directed by Digby Turpin


  • christy

    wow! thanks for posting these-automania 2000 is amazing!!!

  • http://motiondesign.wordpress.com mark webster

    I’m quite surprised Halas & Batchelor have let this one through. I can’t see it staying for long though unless there has been an agreement. For those interested in more on Halas, I can recommend the book, ‘Halas & Batchelor Cartoons. An Animated History.’ Southbank Publishing 2006. The book comes with a DVD in which you’ll find the wonderful Automania 2000 in all its full pixel glory.

  • http://amymebberson.blogspot.com Amy Mebberson

    Late 50′s and early 60′s shorts are the rock-candy of animation. So fun to look at and you can savour them for a long time :)

  • doug holverson

    Okay, we got one parody of a Disney/Kimball edutainment animation and one imitation. The imitation was a little dull and flat.

    Here’s an amusing gee-whiz Disney original:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6S18LCISRm4
    Especially liked the punch card and the tireless atom.

    Snickering while wondering what’s up with Zeus and Hermes…

  • Chris Christy

    This years episode of Dr. Who titled Gridlock’d seems to have borrowed from Automania 2000. In this episode the underground highway is one large traffic jam that has lasted 20 years, and the car passengers live their lives in their cars.

  • RAB SMITH

    I have known of the existence of ‘AUTOMANIA 2000′ for decades, only having seen tantalizing clips in the past………..well worth the wait, and KINDA CHILLING in its own way………..

  • Steve

    very chilling, indeed.

    did anyone notice the early CG near the end of pan-tele-tron?
    kinda rad, actually…

  • Chris Sobieniak

    > I’m quite surprised Halas & Batchelor have let this one through. I can’t see it staying for long though unless there has been an agreement.

    You know YouTube! I would’ve done the same thing too without expressive permission, though I’ll leave that for EastWestDVD to figure out. :-)

    > For those interested in more on Halas, I can recommend the book, ‘Halas & Batchelor Cartoons. An Animated History.’ Southbank Publishing 2006. The book comes with a DVD in which you’ll find the wonderful Automania 2000 in all its full pixel glory.

    Still need to get that, but yes, this film is a must-see either way. Also still quite relevant in today’s world. Often seeing that scene of the kids and the mother watching TV in their car reminded me of having grown up where a black & white TV was stuck in our RV I would watch whenever we were out of the house. I never thought about it then, but today’s modern equivalent would be the portable DVD player or video game console in the back of any SUV. I’ve often read about Halas’ concerns for how we might mistreat technologies in the future, and films like this one is a good example of the warnings we must abide to.

    Hopefully I’ll never live to see the day when cars multiply like rabbits! :-)

  • http://robcatview.blogspot.com Robert

    I suppose Warner’s started it all with those lame “travelogue” shorts, but basing a cartoon around narration always seems to turn out a weak result. Even when Tex Avery did it it was painful to sit thru, but these examples just have the barest bit of ironic disconnect between the spoken and the seen to justify having the imagery at all.