Dad, Can I Borrow the Car?

Dad, Can I Borrow The Car?

Disney historian and author Jim Fanning has written a fine appreciation of the little-seen Ward Kimball featurette Dad, Can I Borrow the Car? (1970). I also wrote some thoughts about this film a few years back. Best of all, somebody has posted the film onto YouTube and it can be seen below in three parts (though it should be noted that there is also a later TV version that is twice the length). And if you’re a fan of Kimball, stay tuned to the Brew for an upcoming post about an even rarer project he directed at Disney.


  • droosan

    That ‘pinstripe drag-race’ in the opening titles has always been a favorite! When I was a kid, I vowed to paint my car like that, when I grew up. But I never did. :(

  • Chuck R.

    Great post, Amid. Thanks!

    The “Disney Treasures” series won’t be complete until all of Kimball’s stuff is released. What happened to “It’s Tough to Be A Bird”? Didn’t that get an Oscar nod? It should have appeared on the “Rarities” disc.

  • Robert Igoe

    I saw a little bit of this years and years ago and I was just thinking of it a few days ago. But I had no idea what the title was. Than I log onto Cartoon Brew and there it was! Thanks, Jerry! No wonder I have this site as one of my favorites on both my home and office computer.

  • Chris Sobieniak

    > The “Disney Treasures� series won’t be complete until all of Kimball’s stuff is released. What happened to “It’s Tough to Be A Bird�? Didn’t that get an Oscar nod? It should have appeared on the “Rarities� disc.

    Ditto. I remember seeing this short many, many years ago and loved it, not really knowing the man behind it. I often think Kimball’s one of those guys that if you stuck him in a locked room with nothing but a piece of paper and a half-sharpened pencil, he’d still come up with something unique and interesting by the end of the day.

  • Pedro Nakama

    I always thought the pinstripe animation was one of the most original and funny things that ever came out of Disney.

  • http://www.tjrmusic.com TJR

    I remember seeing this as a little kid. It made me laugh my head off.

  • droosan

    Having lived in Burbank for the past 15 years, it was a ‘kick’ to recognize the Burbank/Glendale DMV and the Toluca Lake Car Wash. Little did I know that, as a kid, I was getting ‘glimpses’ of my future home-town!

  • Scott

    oh man…I totally remember seeing this when I was llittle. For years I thought I imagined it because you never used to see it anywhere. Had no idea it was Kimball. This just elevates him even higher in my book. Thanks for the post!

  • Ju-osh

    Damn, they should’ve put this on the Deathproof dvd as a bonus feature — the origin of Stuntman Mike!

  • doug holverson

    Was that Kimball in the bald wig playing the used car huskster?

    The car wash scene was just toooo groovy….

  • Tobar

    Hahaha, wow! I come to this blog all the time but never thought I’d see anything I’ve uploaded on it!

  • http://www.myspace.com/crumbcrispcoating Jonathan the Bellboy

    I saw that in a theater as a youngster and remember being convulsed with laughter. Sheer luck that it was the bottom half of some Disney double bill.

    Shouldn’t this have been a special feature on Cars? Or Death Proof? It could be Stuntman Mike’s origin.

  • http://segaltoons.com Steve Segal

    That used car huskster was a comic Kimball knew. When I met Kimball, he told me the camera jammed when he was filming the that sequence, and he didn’t have time for retakes. That’s why he made it look like a TV image interrupted by static. Genius.

  • http://geritopiablogspot.com GeeVee

    I sometimes get the feeling that Kimball was a surrealist in a rather conservative company. I’m not saying that he was a bad fit at Disney’s but I can’t help but wonder what he might have done as a director at Warners. Whenever he was given a little leash, he just ran with it without any of the shades of prudery that is sometimes associated with Disney stuff.

    There’s a lot of signature touches here like the hairy adult hands and monster faces which remind me of Mad and Famous Monsters Magazine art. Ward never seemed to be stuck in any generation and embraced the crazy side of Baby Boom culture going on around him in this film. The California scene is especially visceral.

    A+ for nostalgic thrills.

  • http://www.synthetrix,com Synthetrix

    This was my all-time favorite episode of the Wonderful World Of Disney when I was a kid. Great memories!