Looney Tunes 1941-42 pressbook

Here’s something I’ve never seen before, a 1941 pressbook for Warner Bros. Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts. I’m a nut for stuff like this. Click thumbnails below for larger images. Look at those posters and standees (I’m proud to say I have both one sheets, framed, on my walls). This was certainly the first big push for Bugs Bunny — and to target this sort of publicity to exhibitors indicates that Warners knew they had a new star in their hands.

This item was sold on ebay yesterday. If the buyer is reading this — (hint, hint) — I’d love to get hi-rez scans for my new Looney Tunes book.

UPDATE: Collector Eric Calande found he had two of the character ad mats, pictured in the pressbook above, in his collection and sent in pictures (below). They are naturally reverse image (below right), I flipped them (left and center) to view:


  • http://www.awprunes.blogspot.com/ Larry Levine

    This is truly awesome!!! A very exciting (and groundbreaking) era at Termite Terrace.

  • http://www.downloadpokergames.org DownloadPokerGames

    I could pay a lot for those posters!

  • Joe Torcivia

    Were they GIVING AWAY copies of the Dell Comic LOONEY TUNES AND MERRIE MELODIES # 1 on the lower left of page 2?

    …Oh, the pain!

  • Paul J. Mular

    I always wondered why the Daffy Duck portrayed in the posters has circles around his eyes. He never looked that way in the cartoons.

  • Brian

    Cecil and Sniffles, on the second page, look just like those “draw this!” ads for art schools. You know the ones, they used to run those ads in comic books. Was the company that ran those ads affiliated with Warner?

  • James

    Great find! I love how they advertise certain characters as major when they’re not. I’m sure Wacky Worm was a character cherished by all who saw him (if he was in any cartoons, I don’t know if he was or not).

    Awesome.

  • Mike Fontanelli

    Those theatrical one-sheets are worth a fortune today. Most pre-war movie posters didn’t survive the WWII paper drives – and cartoon posters were much rarer to begin with.

    I’ve only seen one restored, linen-backed LOONEY TUNES poster up close – the Porky & Daffy one in the upper righthand corner – and it was really breathtaking. No reproduction I’ve seen has ever done it justice. Modern animation posters look lifeless in comparison, (probably because they have to go through a corporate obstacle course of committee approval first.)

  • J Lee

    I always wondered why the Daffy Duck portrayed in the posters has circles around his eyes. He never looked that way in the cartoons.

    He did in couple of Clampett’s 1939 cartoons — check out “Wise Quacks” on the LTGC) — and Bob was still trying it on Daffy’s newborn son at the end of “The Henpecked Duck”. Not a very appealing design, though like the Hardaway/Thorsen rabbit design in one of the other promotion posters, some of the designs abandoned by the directors seem to have lived on within the marketing department.

  • Autumn

    Oh man, I love this sort of stuff. Awesome find

  • Nic Kramer

    Great find! I love how they advertise certain characters as major when they’re not. I’m sure Wacky Worm was a character cherished by all who saw him (if he was in any cartoons, I don’t know if he was or not).

    He was in two cartoons, the self-titled “The Wacky Worm” and the Academy Award nominated “Greetings Baits”.

  • http://dmgermain.blogspot.com David Germain

    They really must have thought Bugs was a star. They promoted him twice on that one page.

    As Arty Johnson might say, it’s “veeeeeeeeeeeeery eeeeenteresting” how the Wacky Worm, the Cagey Canary, and the “Pup” were also “stars” they were promoting as well.

  • http://www.cartoonresearch.com/gerstein David Gerstein

    There’s a Cagey Canary team-up with Elmer in an early issue of the LOONEY TUNES comic, too. Somebody clearly thought a canary was intrinsically a marketable character; I wonder whether it was just a coincidence that Tweety later became one?

  • Maggie Simpson

    Aw…if only I was Bill Gates…

  • lindsey seddon

    anyone know how much the looney tunes and merrie melodies comics are worth from 1942 or 1941?