The Princess and the Frog Trailer

The trailer for The Princess and the Frog aired for the first time today on Disney Channel.

(Thanks, Aldon Spears)


  • Tim Hodge

    It will find quite an audience.
    There hasn’t been an animated fairy tale* in theaters for years, and there is a whole new crop of young kids whose moms were young when they saw Little Mermaid. Looks like a fun family film and possibly a good date film.
    I wish them (and all my friends who worked on it) well.

    *And by “animated fairy tale”, I mean a straightforward fantasy, not a parody of the genre (like Shrek, Hoodwinked, and Enchanted)

  • Gerard de Souza

    Well, that answers my question about the story. I had originally thought it may the whole movie of the frog trying to convince the Princess to kiss him. lol.

  • EHH

    I love this!

  • Blatherpuss

    Wait wait, I thought the whole point of this movie was to create some diversity and equality in the Disney brand/films, and the character who represents all that is going to spend the majority of the movie as a frog? You’re sending me mixed signals Disney!!!

  • http://www.pbcbstudios.blogspot.com pbcbstudios

    Looks awesome!

    I’m so proud of the hard work that went into making this film!

  • http://elblogderg.blogspot.com Roberto

    From 1:38 to 2:12 it looks fantastic, lot of great concepts and visuals there.

    While I think the part with Tiana and the frog is nice and all I still find the character animation a bit weird. Sometimes it seems to be quite exaggerated, more like Looney Tunes (which I would probably prefer ) but it seems to have fear of getting too cartoony. I don’t know, some character expressions look much better than others. I think Aladdin, Hercules or even Tarzan were more controlled in the character models. This looks more like Beauty and the Beast, which also have that kind of problem.

    Anyway this is just a nitpick. It distracts me a little but there are other aspects like the backgrounds that look extremely nice and I really love the scenario and set up for the story, which seems very rich: jazz music, voodoo, black magic, a beautiful swamp…I’m expecting very nice musical numbers in this one.

  • http://cheekyentertainment.blogspot.com Craig Clark

    This looks top rate! I’ll be there with my little daughters to check this historical film out. A new attraction for D-lands New Orleans Square? Go 2D, the bandwagon starts here!

  • Jimmy

    Cool!!! I want to see Mama Odie more clearly though. This is like a long elaborate teaser with those callbacks to Aladdin etc. Don’t know why people crying foul, it’s gorgeous IMO.

  • http://foadghorbani.blogspot.com/ Foad

    Kind of copy of Shrek! Fiona turns to shrek style! but it worth watching after all.

  • http://animcareerpro.com/blog Chris

    Great! Keep the tradition alive. Animation fundamentals(principles) need to stay alive – best displayed in a classical style. Although Pixar does those fundamentals great justis in 3D, it’s nice to be reminded of where it came from. We’ll see if the story is engaging…

  • Thomas

    In response to Blatherpuss: Because I just can’t resist arguing over such a silly subject, I think it would do good to remind you that Disney never stated that this movie was being made to “create some diversity and equality in the Disney brand/films”. In fact, it was all of the critics, gossipers, and racism controversy connoisseurs that have been doing a majority of the talking about this movie. (ex), Disney states that the prince is foreign, and in comes the thousands of articles, blogs, and rants about how disney is pushing diversity, racial equality, and in drastic examples, encouraging international trade. Though that last point may be a little exaggerated, it’s not much different from a lot of the accusations the critics of this movie have been making. I myself am very happy with the direction disney is taking this film. They’ve taken a classic story and put a twist on it and made it their own, and in the end, thats all we could ask for.

  • uncle wayne

    and what a REAL treat to see “My City” Disneyfied in animation! Wowwwww!

  • http://hand-drawn-animation.blogspot.com David Nethery

    Very nice to see . Looks beautiful !

    I guess I never quite understand how the Marketing Dept. decides to cut together trailers … if it was me I would have let it be a totally magical surprising moment for the audience when she turns into a frog. But who’s quibbling ? Not me. I’m really glad to see hand-drawn Disney animation coming back to the big screen.

    Can hardly wait for later this year …

    August – Ponyo (yay!)

    December – Princess & the Frog (yay!)

  • fogfan

    I cannot wait to see this and I hope they work out all the story kinks in time. Does anyone know if the music used in the trailer is from the film or taken from another soundtrack?

  • Rodrigo

    Perspective wonkiness during the business around 1:00? Anyone else?

  • Kyle Maloney

    Wow, very nice. its true that this does look more exaggerated than preview disney films, and you know what, I love that. her character isnt as southern sounding as I expected based on the teaser, but thats not a bad thing either. cant wait to see this.

  • mike

    Roberto, i agree with your animation nitpick.. it just feels off to me.. maybe it’s from all this 3D nonsense and working on and expecting a lot more nuances in the acting.. but overall i felt the acting choices in the trailer were just bland.. regardless, i’m happy to see 2D back.. it is what i majored in after all…

  • DanO

    So they prefixed the trailer with clips of four movies that use the same formula….

  • http://www.theanimationcritic.blogspot.com Mike Caracappa

    So according to the trailer, the last four films Disney was proud of came out 15 years ago! That makes me confident.

  • http://www.onanimation.com Dan Caylor

    Looks really good. But will it be good enough to revive the industry? I really really hope so. Fingers crossed.

  • Amelia

    So I guess they should have used clips from “Home on the Range” and “Atlantis” huh? What the heck were they thinking using clips from movies people actually liked? It’s a world gone mad guys.

  • http://www.bishopanimation.com Floyd Bishop

    Mike: I caught that too… and all of them Katzenberg films to boot!

  • jaycee

    I LOVE 2D Disney, and I think this will be very good, BUT:

    Some of the animation in this trailer was not up to the past Disney standards!! Like, the scene with “Welcome Prince Naveen” at the boat, looks really bland, as well as the ragtag band of singers and dancers…

    It kinds reminds me of the style of “Anastasia” from Fox, which was a bland-looking movie overall: too clean and soft looking!

    I hope this movie’s style is a little more striking overall….

  • Mr. Lowenstein

    Looks great!
    The effects animation is amazing!!

  • Brecht Debaene

    jaycee, it’s not like Disney hasn’t done bland scenes in the past. Every movie has them. Especially in a crowd shot like that, that’s where economics usually take the forefront and they get a bit rushed. Compared to some of the crowd shots in say, pocahontas, the one in this trailer looks pretty good. Those are the kinds of shots that are on screen for 2 maybe 3 seconds and the audience is all looking at 1 point anyway, so they spend their money where the eye of the audience is, they don’t really care about animation buffs freeze framing those kinds of shots :). So it’s normal that they don’t really look “up to par” if that.

  • billy bob

    cute, even though I won’t see it. (At 21 years old and being a male, these disney fairy tale princess deals just don’t do it anymore).

    but still

    THE 2d IS BACK!!!!!!!!! YAAAAYYY!!!!!!!!

  • http://tomboycomics.blogspot.com Emily

    I really don’t think you can judge a film by its trailer. You can get a vibe about it, but you don’t know how the film will play out in its entirety. I remember seeing the trailer for Kung Fu Panda and immediately labeling it as “stupid.” I was wrong.

    But I guess making a post about an upcoming film and expecting people to comment on it…well, what else can one expect than some kind of criticism? What else is there to say? “Yay, for Disney!”? This isn’t a Disney fan site.

    Anyways, I am of the Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, etc. generation, and though my tastes have matured, I still think Beauty and the Beast is a great film. I wish this one all the best, but am not expecting that it will be good, decent, bad, or great…though it looks to me like everyone involved in this project is making a sincere effort for the film to succeed.

  • http://www.theanimationcritic.blogspot.com Mike Caracappa

    “So I guess they should have used clips from “Home on the Range” and “Atlantis” huh? What the heck were they thinking using clips from movies people actually liked? It’s a world gone mad guys.”

    Well that’s the thing Amelia. The problem that’s totally blatent in all the trailers and footage for this film is how political and calculated this movie is. I mean, look at all the footage and trailers we’ve seen so far. Is there really anything that original going with this movie? Okay, so Disney has never done a black princess before. Big whoop. If they were that desperate to tell a story with an african american character, how about actually using a story from African American culture? There are plenty of princess stories in there. It’s a lot more dignified than just slapping a black princess into a left over fairy tale. So the film is also set in New Orleans (gee, ya think there’s gonna be a Disneyland promotion somewhere in there?) and it’s yet another musical with songs by Randy Newman. Totally not calculated. And as far as this film “saving 2D”, no audience outside of animation geeks is going to care. Maybe they would take notice of the 2D more if Disney could ever have the balls to actually tell an animated story that wasn’t trapped under the same formula brand. It’s like watching the whole damn cycle start all over again because Disney won’t commit to doing anything ‘other’ than the Disney Musical.

    It’s not that it was a bad idea for Disney to make “Atlantis”, but it’s pretty obvious that story was hacked at several times over to make it more “Disney”. In fact, any the studio tries any actual experimenting with the stories in their films, all it comes down to is them dipping their toe in the water, then backing away (ex. “The Hunchback of Notre Dame”, “Atlantis”, “Treasure Planet”). It’s like an artist that spends their whole career doing one thing, and the moment they want to do something else, it becomes too scary and they go back to doing what they were good at in the first place. That artist makes a choice to stick to their thing, except the reality is there’s also no commitment to growth. How amazing would “Hunchback of Notre Dame” been had they the studio allowed itself to go for broke and tell the original story? You get a taste of that just watching “Hellfire” song. Even though the majority of Walts first few features like Pinnochio, Fantasia and Bambi (all different types of films btw) were flops at the box office, look at the kind of impact those films had on the development and artistic direction of animation! They’re all sophisticated in their own way and the studio at least had the courage to go all the way with their stories and not back out half way out of fear. They may have flopped at the box office, but at least they left a mark. The “expirimental” films from the last decade wouldn’t even go all the way and they still flopped. No ones going to remember “Treasure Planet” in the next 50 years compared to Pinnochio or Bambi. It’s sad and ironic because today a much loved company like Disney is trapped under the name of their own brand. It can’t and won’t let itself be anything else. So when I look at something like “The Princess and the Frog”, where Disney is telling us they’re “going back to it’s roots”, all it proves to me is that it’s a company that’s afraid to grow up.

  • http://animationaddiction.blogspot.com Kevin H

    Looks stunning.

  • http://sacks10.blogspot.com/ SACKS10

    I love it! I wonder what the next 2D film will be. I hope they show a trailer for it before the princess movie.

  • http://zekeyspaceylizard.blogspot.com Zekey

    did I see just see dancing VooDoo Dolls playing the drums? Heck yeah I did!
    Well I’m sold.

  • http://www.fooksie.com Fooksie

    As long as the Villain doesn’t fall to his death, I think this will be a fun movie!

    • Cale Baird

      He falls through a portal into Hell, does that count?

  • mat

    Thats a big spoiler about her turning into a frog. Disney should have kept that secret. When are we going to see an american ponyo trailer? Disney needs to make one soon.

  • http://rwentworth.blogspot.com Richard Wentworth

    I think this actually looks kinda cool… if they can keep the schmaltzy love tunes to a minimum, should be a fun time. Gotta love 2D animated voodoo!

  • http://kittyhasfleaz.blogspot.com/ Felicia Spano

    I don’t think the trailer does the film justice at all. However, I think the overall film looks very promising. :)

  • http://elblogderg.blogspot.com Roberto

    I am only criticizing the animation acting in certain scenes. We can perfectly judge that by the trailer. I also said there were a lot of things I liked there. I’m not judging the whole movie. And after watching the movie I’ll still notice these problems, but maybe the story and the scenarios are so good that I won’t care that much. It seems that you should either love everything about it or hate it. It’s not like that. I am actually excited about seeing it after watching several things of that trailer but I still find the acting a little off.

  • Ryan

    I really hope Alan Menken’s doing the soundtrack… With songs and everything, haven’t had a good Disney song since the Hunchback of Notre Dame.

  • chap

    oh wow this looks better than I was expecting

  • hogarth

    I’m glad to see the mostly positive comments, now that you’ve finally seen a tiny bit of the actual movie. I was getting pretty tired of the bashing going on based on seeing absolutely NOTHING.

    And billy bob, I’m a male in my mid-50s, and I can assure you there is plenty of stuff in this movie beyond the “fairy tale princess” angle. It is a film the whole family can enjoy.

  • http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=052C631F61EE2838 Iain

    I can’t help but be reminded of “Swan Princess” from this trailer. I sorta knew that Tiana too would be turned into a frog after seeing some of the leaked production design work. But the trailer looks great though.

    2:04 – Expect a “Big Lipped Alligator Moment” from that big lipped alligator playing the trumpet.

  • Scott

    Does anyone else feel like they were looking at a Disney DTV sequel? The animation, ink and paint, backgrounds, and “over all’ design don’t look to be up to snuff.

    My other issue here is one with the TRAILER, which is the only thing we can speak of so far. By all appearances, there isn’t one CHARACTER that’s going to pull me into the movie theater. Compare this to the “Up” trailer and you’ll see what I mean, hopefully. We haven’t been introduced to any personalities to connect with and personalities are what appeal to audiences… I’m worried. Additionatly, the trailer score was incredibly generic and bland.

    This trailer appears to be a failure.

  • Jen

    Wow cynical much Mike? I’m sorry you feel that way dude. I would say I think you should see the film before you make these kind of judgments, but I think you’ve made up your mind to hate this film no matter what it is.

    As for me I’m so excited everyone here is excited to see the movie! Yay 2d! woo!

  • http://cosmicdash.com hpkomic

    I’m pleased so far, and I hope that the final film delivers.

    As for the prince himself, I certainly hope there is some real character development for him, so he’s more likable by the end.

  • Jonah Sidhom

    I don’t see what people mean about the Direct-to-video look. It looks perfectly fine to me!

    I can’t wait to see a 2D movie in theaters! The last one I saw was Lion King, but I was 4 and I don’t remember it.

  • Mantichore

    Well, if he only gets more likeable by the end, he’ll have spent most of the film being unlikeable. That’s the problem with Princes Charming: they are bland, dull pieces of plot. You spend the whole film enjoying the Beast (and loathing by the Gaston interludes!), and at the end of the film, the Beast gets turned into the bland Prince. And that’s a happy end.

    Yeah, I know it’s in the original tale. But conformity as reward is a plot point Disney goes for far too often.

  • http://elblogderg.blogspot.com Roberto

    What mike says is mostly true. He’s perhaps a little too harsh with the movie without actually watching it first, but he does have a point regardless of how good or bad this particular movie is. I mean, I’m expecting to enjoy this movie and I think the formula can still work when done right, but it’s true that it’s not exactly a revolutionary concept what they are showing us here. I think there would be new things due to the set up and maybe John Lasseter’s input will make things a little more tight story-wise, but I also believe Disney should experiment and change their formula a little more. The only excuse they have now is that most of their experiments didn’t work financially and only some of them worked artistically. But they really should try some new stories in the future. I think it’s perfectly possible to keep true to Disney spirit/tone while including new things. Lilo and Stitch was one example.

  • http://chippyandloopus.com/ John S

    I’m gonna give this a chance.
    There seems to be a lot of cool stuff in there.
    It’s a riff on the Disney fairy tale formula and that is cool with me, as long as it’s a well played riff.
    Yessir, I’m going to give it a chance and I encourage you all to do the same.

  • Esperanza

    Frankly, I am amazed. Disney as the great new hope for 2D with the same approach and aesthetic that it used in the 1940′s?

    This is depressing

  • http://www.keithlango.com keith lango

    Change the formula and run the significant risk of losing the larger general audience of hundreds of thousands of families that know what they want from Disney and are relying on having those expectations met when they plunk down their $8.

    Disney is (for better or worse) a well established, profitable commodity brand. It’s visual toothpaste with a minty tingle. When I squeeze that tube I want minty toothpaste, not gravy flavored tooth cleaning powder. Commodity brands change their formulas and throw curve balls to their customers at their own peril. New Coke anyone? Recently Tropicana tried “breaking the mold” with their orange juice packaging (just the packaging, mind you- not even the actual juice itself). The result for this fresh faced boldness? An immediate drop in sales of almost 30%. It didn’t take them long to change back to the old way of doing things. Commodity brands are like that. Their bread is buttered by meeting expectations. If folks really want 2d animation as a production choice to come back, then they really ought to be pulling for the safest possible return on investment here.

    Now, market stuff aside- this looks fun. I embrace the cartoony-ness of the acting and animation. The ‘Live Action Lite’ of CG acting is getting kinda threadbare. My only beef artistically is the over-abundance of super saturated primary colors. At times it crosses the line from vibrant to obnoxious. Might be the digital nature of production that allows the color saturation to be so intense. Older (and I mean older) Disney pics had a softer, more subtle tone while still remaining vibrant. I think the natural media and the film process itself really helped tie it together more. Maybe this visual cue is what makes people think of the direct-to-DVD products, all of which were a result of the digital ink & paint CAPS era. Lilo & Stitch used traditional analog media for a lot of their production art and that film had a certain richness to it (visually) that was altogether missing from something like Home on the Range or Treasure Planet. I think there’s definitely something to the digital production element that makes hand drawn animated films look kinda cheap.

    Just my two pennies.

  • James R.

    Good to see so many positive responses! Congratulations and good luck to everyone involved.

  • J

    I’m going to reserve judgement until I see the film – the gossip I’m hearing from inside Disney is that as a film it’s looking good – but VISUALLY at least, this is incredibly dull and generic. Frankly considering the talent working on the film I’m really disappointed with how this looks – never mind the fact it looks identical to every movie made by Disney in the Nineties, the animation looks very crude – it’s almost as if I’ve seen those ‘acting’ patterns and gestures before in other Disney films and the animators have copied them verbatim from their own previous work.

    I’ve been lucky enough to see work on SYLVAIN CHOMET’S latest feature THE ILLUSIONIST, and I think when the guys at Disney see how unbelievable that film looks, they will hang their heads in shame at a missed opportunity to really push the boat out and WOW not only the animation world but the paying public as well. There is some seriously amazing animation being produced for Illusionist. Whilst I cannot comment on the story for it, visually its Triplettes de Belleville +1000 (at least); it looks fresh, the drawing standard is of the highest calibre, and some scenes left me with my jaw on the ground due to the sheer virtuosity of the scale of the ARTISTIC AMBITION of the film. It’s a real shame there’s no trailer yet but apparently it’s due to be released this year (?).

    Don’t get me wrong – I WANT Frog and Princess to succeed – Disney are waiting to see how it performs at the BO before greenlighting any more 2D features, and as a 2D Animator I want these films to be made and do well so I can continue to work in the 2D medium. Glen Keane has always said that we should be pushing 2D into new territories and using the computer to attempt to create something new and different – but from the trailer posted above I am sad that Disney have produced exactly the same old look which to my eyes looks dull and insipid. Let’s hope the film has a CRACKER of a story to back up its tired disappointing visuals. Fingers crossed…

  • Jason

    Well this trailer tops the last one by a mile. And it looks like Disney has masterfully blended something old (2D animation) with something new (a black “princess”). Throw in some spicy New Orleans atmosphere and it looks like it’s a winner. My hopes for this have been restored. Good job, Iger, Lasseter and Co. May the Magic be with you!

  • http://none Zack Mays

    Looks Good , lets hope it’s Great !!!

  • http://ClaarToons.comwillappearsometimethisyear;Imtoobusyanimating! tony claar

    Disney has to start again SOMEWHERE. Lasseter & co. are very, very clever; don’t underestimate them. It is wise to START this new era with a style and story, ie. fairy tales, that DO remind us of Disney’s glorious past. There IS a built-in audience there and THEY KNOW IT.
    After this film succeeds with the American people (not just with, or in spite of, college animation students of 2D, 3D or stop-motion or with critics) who are really hungry for a fun, fantasy-driven, hand-drawn animated film that “works”( and is not cynical ), THEN Lasseter & co. will start experimenting…slowly, but surely, to create “the new”; you can bet on it. This is all going to be very, very good for all of us.

  • http://www.onanimation.com Dan Caylor

    @Esperanza

    Well according to John K that’s when it all went down hill. Maybe we can pick up from there, or maybe it’s up to all of us. Who knows.

    I am anxious to see though.

  • Cameron

    Okay, forget my prior thoughts. I am completely sold on this movie.

    Though I find it funny that they only show the three best received Disney movies of the early 90s renaissance. They’re ignoring all the great classics that came before and all the fascinating mixed-bags they made afterward (a few of which, such as Mulan and The Hunchback of Notre Dame, I prefer to The Little Mermaid and The Lion King).

  • ridoual

    nice visuals. but too much talking, as I was afraid. high standard animated features shouldn’t be animated sitcoms. I hate to see animated stand-up comedians. leave all the talking and the so-called wittiness to television and show us some visual poetry and powerful stories.

    also disappointed they couldn’t help doing their twist thing. I’m very conservative on this matter. for those wanting twists, there’s shrek. that’s really not what I want to see in a 2D-traditional animated film supposed to carry on the tradition of cinderella and beauty and the beast.

  • http://www.autodaddy.blogspot.com Tom

    I think it looks fine. It’s a kids’ film, so if it doesn’t attract middle aged men and women it doesn’t mean anything’s wrong with the film.

    I do think that it might be time to retire the “legacy” advertising that Disney’s been addicted to for the last 20 years. We all KNOW who Disney is, and spending half of a television spot reminding us seems a little pathetic.

  • Talita Fukumoto

    At least lot’s of paper are saved since most of it was animated with a Cintiq tablet…

  • http://www.onanimation.com Dan Caylor

    @Talita

    I heard otherwise. I heard it was all paper. Can anyone confirm?

  • Dock Miles

    “Disney is (for better or worse) a well established, profitable commodity brand. It’s visual toothpaste with a minty tingle. When I squeeze that tube I want minty toothpaste, not gravy flavored tooth cleaning powder. Commodity brands change their formulas and throw curve balls to their customers at their own peril. New Coke anyone? Recently Tropicana tried “breaking the mold” with their orange juice packaging (just the packaging, mind you- not even the actual juice itself). The result for this fresh faced boldness? An immediate drop in sales of almost 30%. It didn’t take them long to change back to the old way of doing things. Commodity brands are like that. Their bread is buttered by meeting expectations. If folks really want 2d animation as a production choice to come back, then they really ought to be pulling for the safest possible return on investment here.”

    Right on the money. I’ve been buffeted by an endless string of “new Disney classics!” since I was a little kid in the ’50s. I was glad to see Gloptron Disney stopped shoveling crap to the masses with “Little Mermaid,” but ultimately what Gloptron does is beside the point because they’ve so co-opted the field of play. Way on the edge of the US screen, Japan offers an alternative animation universe, not without its own problems, and still too restricted. But the big Gloptron boat is hardly rocked.

    As long as Disney is the de facto global standard of animation, it will remain a lovely little stub of its potential.

  • Brian

    I don’t know about you, but that voodoo guy might be my new favorite villain. Even in the brief clips in the trailer he looks to be wildly entertaining.

  • andreas Wessel-Therhorn

    mostly animated on paper. its nice to see some good will comments this time. we, who are lucky enough to work on this picture, are grateful for the opportunity and are proud to be associated with it. as for the nay sayers… if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say nothing at all ;-)

  • http://hand-drawn-animation.blogspot.com David Nethery

    05/10/09 5:59pm Talita Fukumoto says:

    “At least lot’s of paper are saved since most of it was animated with a Cintiq tablet… ”

    05/10/09 6:22pm , Dan Caylor says:
    @Talita I heard otherwise. I heard it was all paper. Can anyone confirm”

    ——

    It’s some of both. Some effects animation is being done on Cintiqs . Most of the character rough animation and clean-up is on paper. My guess is that most of the BG’s are digital.

  • joe s

    as a shareholder, please go see it several times.

  • bert klein

    although barely seen in the trailer, i want to add that animation fans are in for a treat when they see more of the alligator. It is in my opinion lead animator Eric Goldberg and crew’s(which i am a biased member of) best work.

  • Jett

    Despite all the snark about Princess movies…the fact remains that it’s *always* been a Princess movie that has jump started each “age” of great Disney animation. Snow White, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Little Mermaid…now it looks like we’re getting The Frog Princess and I can’t wait.
    Disney isn’t MAKING the film for us, a bunch of animation die hard nitpickers…they are making it for a whole brand new generation of kids who *never saw* a `princess movie’ in theaters. It’s been a long time since Beauty and the Beast. (Ye gods that makes me feel old…I graduated from high school that year.)

  • Pedro Nakama

    Okay is it just me or does anybody else see this as a way for Disney to sell princess costumes to little black girls when they go to Disneyland.

  • Jonah Sidhom

    Pedro: It’s definitely not just you. But I think you’re wrong.

    There have been eight Disney princesses so far, and the ninth happens to be black.

    Does that mean they only made her to sell dresses to little black girls?
    You’re really just pulling that out of the air from no where as far as I can tell.

  • jaycee

    I agree, it looks a LITTLE DTV… not trying to b mean. But some of the art looks “soft” and “pale”, like that Little Mermaid prequel that just came out last year….

  • Levi

    Looks alright. Good or Bad I want this film to do ridiculously well. However, I hate the fact that everybody is relying so heavily on just one film to bring back 2D. And a fairy tale princess story…alright I’ll give them the space for playing safe this first round. But if it does well and another 2D film is in the works, it better be something a little more innovative. No matter what, I know how hard these movies are to make being an animator myself. So kudos for the hard work artists, and lets hope for the best!

  • Jack

    I don’t know if anyone else noticed, but a little over 2:00 into the trailer a certain infamous number can be seen on the front of a trolley. Could be coincidence, or could have something to do with a certain room at Calarts :)

  • http://doujinshiland.blogspot.com Adam

    This movie’s gonna make a /fortune/.

    Anyone who thinks otherwise is fooling themself.

    Just LOOK at it.

    Even a big pack of toon brew’s bitter haters are changing their tune.

  • Manning

    To Jack (@ 5/10/09 10:47PM)

    Wow – well spotted. I clocked it at exactly 1:59. That’s certainly no coincidence :)

    The trailer looks great and it’s nice to see so many positive comments.

  • Luke Randall

    I can’t wait for this, I really hope it opens the door for more 2D features from Disney.

  • Trevor

    I think if the amount of comments princess and the frog posts here indicate anything, its that this film will make millions.

  • http://awprunes.wordpress.com Larry Levine

    Trailer looks good to me, plus I’m a big Eric Goldberg fan :)

  • http://www.vivaortegacy.com Dave-O

    I’m not surprised that “Treasure Planet” was left off the list of Musker/Clements collabs. ;)

    Looks real promising. I gotta say, I’m a little disappointed with the character design of the princess… basically looks like an African-American “Belle”.

    In general I’m concerned about the hyper-sentimentalist tendencies of Disney under Lassater. When in doubt, tug on those heartstrings by having characters get all quiet/weepy/abandoned. “Bolt” was promising, but devolved into cliches. I ended up feeling manipulated in so many parts.

    Here’s hoping!

  • http://www.edwardr.theatricana.com Edward R. Cox

    At last, some of the visuals in action which I had been hearing about (and seeing stills of) from friends within the hallowed animation halls.

    Though it’s part of some people’s natures to pick things apart before giving them the real chance they deserve, I prefer to look from a native New Orleanian’s point of view. The Down pan of St. Louis Cathedral, and it’s interior…(hardly something one would expect to see in any animated feature)… the facade of the cathedral, the Presbytere and Jackson Square, the paddlewheeler in the swamp, the lace ironwork balconies, the history laden cottages and mansions. These are images I live with and travel through daily in my life, and I could not surpress the tears of joy at how glorious these moments in this trailer were. (Even the multi layered pan from the clouds to the French Quarter and Cathedral onto the lace iron-work balcony in the first teaser trailer was enough to give me and many others here goosebumps!) Thank you everyone for creating this love song to New Orleans! I can promise you, we’ll all “get it” here and embrace this film. Hopefully others will too after experiencing this film and want to come visit the real thing for it’s magic, it’s music, it’s history and it’s love.

    Everyone here at Cartoon Brew knows how I and so many others wish this film were rightfully being premiered here in New Orleans, but at least what I have seen today proves that this film’s crew studied and have presented New Orleans in the most glorious way possible. True traditional Disney Feature Animation! Thank you one and all!

    People will pick apart character, story, interactions, voices, music and songs and more…but they can not pick apart the obvious love and care that went into creating the visuals of my home town and outlying areas. The locales depicted are real, they exist, and the studio isn’t “faking it” and making it up, visually! Disney has brought New Orleans to stunning life with incredible heart and artistry! The film’s locations are a large part of the charms of New Orleans, and since we are awash in history down here, the history of the United States as well. Truly stunning work everyone, and I can not wait to see this on the big screen again and again.

  • Gee Dee

    Would it not have been more accurate to preface the trailer with scenes from “Anastasia” and “Thumbalina” as this film’s inspiration? And speaking of that, why didn’t they bring Bluth back to direct this? Isn’t this more up his alley?

    Have a good time at the movies, everyone else, as you financially contribute to another massive world wide gross celebrating safety and mediocrity in the field of animation storytelling.

    As for me…I’m off to look at “Inki and the Minah Bird” for free on Youtube.

  • http://animite.blogspot.com animite

    Way to go guys! Looks amazing!!!!

  • Jason

    **Would it not have been more accurate to preface the trailer with scenes from “Anastasia” and “Thumbalina” as this film’s inspiration? And speaking of that, why didn’t they bring Bluth back to direct this? Isn’t this more up his alley?

    Have a good time at the movies, everyone else, as you financially contribute to another massive world wide gross celebrating safety and mediocrity in the field of animation storytelling. **

    Don Bluth rebelled against Disney, and then went forth to make the most Disney-derived films on record. And worse, he stole all the BAD stuff and none of the good. It’s ironic that he criticized something he clearly never really understood. I was sympathetic to Bluth at first until I saw stuff like “All Dogs Go To Heaven”. What a mess.

    The rest of your post is pure drivel, and unworthy of further comment.

  • http://markpudleiner.blogspot.com/ pudleiner

    So happy to see pencil drawings move again.
    Good for the soul :-)

  • http://awprunes.wordpress.com Larry Levine

    Does anyone know if the animation is being drawn with Cintiqs or pencil/paper (or a combination of both)?

  • http://ClaarToons.comwillappearsometimethisyear;Imtoobusyanimating! tony claar

    “As for me…I’m off to look at “Inki and the Minah Bird” for free on Youtube.”
    Thank you to Gee Dee. What a true genius innovated as creative animation in the 1940′s, ie. Mr. Jone’s “Inki and the Minah Bird”, has been all but forgotten today. This also includes his brilliant innovations in “Dover Boys” and his highly creative animation in many of his “Road Runner” cartoons.
    It was 70 years ago and he is STILL ahead of his time in 2009……
    (see the “Extremes and In-betweens” DVD about Chuck Jone’s life to learn what a genius he was. I show it in all of my classes. )
    We want Disney to eventually break the mold of it’s past and blossom
    into true innovators once again. Here’s hoping…..

  • Oscar Grillo

    If they want to revitalize and energize 2-D animation they should start avoiding stretch…..I will avoid starting a discussion about the unbelievably predictable and boring character design, but……..

  • Matt

    @Larry Levine – Character animation was drawn traditionally on paper. FX animation was done on cintiqs. BGs were probably done digitally.

    I heard most of the character animators decided against using Cintiqs while working on the Goofy “How to Hook Up your Home Theater” short, finding a problem with being able to get accurate lines for more subtle animation.

  • http://www.galvinator.blogspot.com Galvinator

    Fade in> I’ve seen the trailer a few times over now, every second popular blogger seems to be posting it.

    Scene> The extremely talented artists behind the project are proudly shouting from their rooftops and are uncontainable in their excitement and enthusiasm for it.

    Conclusion> Don’t knock it ’til you’ve seen it. From what I’ve seen so far it looks like it’s gonna thrill and entertain the kids. That’s what it’s all about. I don’t know about the rest of you guys, but from where I work in TV storyboredom the hallowed halls and desks (with disks) at Disney is still an old job aspiration.

    Good luck to the team behind it! >Fade out! (stupid gag I know!)

  • http://bobbypontillas.com Bobby Pontillas

    As an animation guy, I know that this film has assembled some of the best 2D animators in the world, so I’m looking forward to seeing their work again.

    As a movie goer, while it is reminiscent of 90′s Disney , hell man I grew up on that stuff, so it’s got me excited to experience a film like this again.

    Let Disney be Disney, let Sylvain Chomet be Sylvain Chomet, the variety of whats out there is what makes this medium awesome.

  • http://tomboycomics.blogspot.com Emily

    Jason-
    Everyone has their own opnions on movies n’ stuff, but personally I loved both The Land Before Time and An American Tail, both of which I feel have vary serious tones and themes to them…Jewish mice immigrating to America and dealing with “cats” ala Maus, and in Land Before Time, losing your mother, then constantly thinking about your loss as Little Foot does.

    In my last viewing of Land Before Time, I couldn’t believe how bleak and sad it was.

  • Someone

    Looks great, can’t wait to see it. But what’s up with that intro, annoying as all hell. Yes the drew it. Big whoop, now go get your trophy and sit down. I don’t care if you used your own feces to make the film, if the story isn’t good it doesn’t matter if you drew it or not.

  • http://dailygrail.com/blog/8389 red pill junkie

    Obviously one cannot judge an entire movie based solely on the trailer.

    But the trailer’s objective is to get people excited about wanting to see the movie.

    So in that sense the trailer was not entirely successful with me. I’m intrigued with the movie because visually it looks gorgeous, and I’m probably going to see it on a theater. But I’m not counting the days to its release —True, this movie is not really focused at me, but at a much younger audience.

    IMO I would have cut the part when the Princess turns into a frog herself. And the intro was certainly tedious; to be reminded of the past successes of the studio shouldn’t be necessary (It’s Disney for Chrissakes), and yet now it is.

    Yeah, this movie looks like it’s going to be a huge hit; and going about the business of revitalizing the 2D market by first doing a classic-style Princess film is certainly the smart move.

    But… God Dammit! I don’t want Lasseter & Co. handling the Disney Animation division in a smart (a.k.a. safe) way. I want them to be bold! I want Fantasia-quality stuff, even if it flops at the box office.

    Is that not the way to conduct a multi-billion dollar business? Perhaps… perhaps you need to be small to be bold.

  • http://www.artisticanatomyblog.com/ Chris Hatfield

    No articulate dissertation in this comment just two words, “It’s alive”

  • whahuh

    But… God Dammit! I don’t want Lasseter & Co. handling the Disney Animation division in a smart (a.k.a. safe) way. I want them to be bold! I want Fantasia-quality stuff, even if it flops at the box office. Is that not the way to conduct a multi-billion dollar business? Perhaps… perhaps you need to be small to be bold.

    This is all over the place. You know that “Fantasia” was not a small movie, and that it lost millions, right? It was a gamble and it lost, unfortunately. Now I’m all for gambles, but on the other hand not for losing one’s shirt or one’s studio’s existence.

    Whatever YOU want, an artistically brilliant flop is NOT what the Disney company wants. John Lasseter is now for all extents and purposes an employee of the WDC. He has authority and probably some fair share of autonomy at Pixar for good reason. He certainly has a lot of say and a certain amount of greenlighting power over Burbank. But what Pixar is doing and can do is a completely different story from what Bob Iger and the rest of the men in Burbank expect to deliver to shareholders from their own animation division.

    That’s reality.

  • Mr. Lowenstein

    the better quality trailer is up on their own site:

    http://disney.go.com/disneypictures/princessandthefrog/

  • Cabel

    Gee Dee: “Have a good time at the movies, everyone else, as you financially contribute to another massive world wide gross celebrating safety and mediocrity in the field of animation storytelling.”

    Wow, you’re right — we should all BOYCOTT this movie! Then, when the safe, formulaic 2D movie horribly fails at the box office, they’ll CERTAINLY immediately decide take some chances with riskier, edgier 2D material!

    Sarcasm-sigh.

    It’s obvious to me this is a stepping stone. This is the safe, banking-on-the-past, please-see-this-movie movie. And, with any luck, it’ll reignite the art form — commercially, at least. Then, with Pixar’s masterful story focus, maybe we’ll get the more experimental and less-formulaic 2D films, without the watering down and second-guessing that killed late-stage Disney.

    I’m excited as hell for the whole thing, and can’t wait to see it.

  • http://www.mikebustacappa.blogspot.com Mike Caracappa

    Jen says:
    Wow cynical much Mike? I’m sorry you feel that way dude. I would say I think you should see the film before you make these kind of judgments, but I think you’ve made up your mind to hate this film no matter what it is.

    As for me I’m so excited everyone here is excited to see the movie! Yay 2d! woo!”

    You know Jen, Disney could honestly care less if this movie saves 2D. If there really was an artistic drive behind this film, the trailers wouldn’t feel so calculated. And they wouldn’t be making political desisions like sticking an African American princess into a classic fairy tale, set in a city tied to a Disney theme park. If they really want 2D to come back and be accpeted by the public, it has to be taken somewhere NEW.

    Except they’re not going to do that because they have no guts. It’s not the studio of Walts days where risks and gambles were common, and they could honestly could care less about the artform as long as they fill up theater seats. They’re taking advantage of the whole princess merchendising craze, so a black princess will just shake that up. They’re caught up in their own brand name. The whole 2D thing is just a selling point on people’s nostalgia. It has absolutely NOTHING to do with the artform. They want to get back that feeling from the four Katzenberg era films that were so successful, because they were in 2D. You’re investing your hopes into something that’s just meant to start up a whole cycle all over again. It’s not advancing the artform, they’re not telling stories that haven’t already been done several before. It’s the same wacky comical characters that will make good plush toys. The film is going to be successful anyway because people are going to fall for the Disney brand name.

    So because of all that, I don’t want this film to bring 2D back to Disney. I want a Fantasia. Or an Iron Giant. I want something that’s driven by it’s own beating heart and not just an excuse to sell tiaras at Disneyland.

  • acetate

    Mike, you can never be too rich, too thin, or have too many tiaras at Disneyland !

  • Zero

    Will it be in Digital 3D :)))

  • http://dailygrail.com/blog/8389 red pill junkie

    “This is all over the place. You know that “Fantasia” was not a small movie, and that it lost millions, right? It was a gamble and it lost, unfortunately. Now I’m all for gambles, but on the other hand not for losing one’s shirt or one’s studio’s existence.”

    I’m certainly aware of that, whahuh. But if you had to choose between Fantasia & Aladdin (which was a major success), it wouldn’t be that difficult to pick the former, right?

    What’s the measure for success? I mean a truly fair measure of success?

    I’ll end up my rant by saying that, in his lifetime, Leonardo DaVinci had more flops and failures that successes —dude could hardly get a commission finished!— but we certainly wouldn’t remember him as such a genius if he hadn’t acted that way.

    And the sad thing is, in this day and age, Leonardo would never end up as the director of any big corporation.

    That’s why I wrote that today, to be bold you have to be small.

  • http://dailygrail.com/blog/8389 red pill junkie

    “Will it be in Digital 3D :)))”

    Hmm… I was wondering that very same thing myself ;-)

  • Justin

    Mike, have you ever met Ron Clements and John Musker? They are the ones who pitched the idea to John Lasseter. I can guarantee you that the conversation did NOT go like this: “Hey J.L., we want to capitalize on people’s nostalgia for 2D animation so lets make a princess movie so that Consumer Products will be able to sell lots of dolls, and lets make it a black princess so that we can sell it to African American families, and lets set it in New Orleans so that we can tie it into the theme parks.”

    Ron and John are making the movie that THEY want, not the one that corporate Disney wants. It just so happens that those two desires coincide with each other. The trailers and marketing are so calculated because they are coming from Marketing whose job is to make those calculations. If you’re in Marketing why would you not take advantage of the nostalgia of Disney’s recent hits, or the fact that the Princess is African American, or the settings of New Orleans?

    All of the story choices, character design choices, animation choices, and all other artistic choices are coming from Ron and John. It shouldn’t be surprising then that you are seeing a movie that looks and feels a lot like their other movies (The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, Hercules). If you want bold and daring you’re going to have to look somewhere else.

  • http://www.jupeykrusho.com jupey krusho

    can’t wait for this!!!

    wonderful animation and great art crew!

    way too many adult BOLD DARING animations around the world to complain about this. put forth a little effort and find it yourselves instead of trying to constantly push a square into a circle…?

    i plan on watching this the same way i watched kung fu panda – with an open mind and open heart for the medium i fell in love eons ago…hopefully with the same exciting results.

    triumph!

  • Daniel Spencer
  • Gee Dee

    Oscar Grillo says:

    “If they want to revitalize and energize 2-D animation they should start avoiding stretch…..I will avoid starting a discussion about the unbelievably predictable and boring character design, but……..”

    That these words come from one of the top ten international animation talents of the last 40 years should mean something to all of us. Thanks Oscar for being unbelievably UN-predictable and never, ever boring.

  • Miles

    I really have high hopes for this film; it’s been too long since Disney did 2-D! It looks beautiful!

    There is one thing that worries me, however. In a previous posting, a rough cut review by a fellow named “Michael” said that crucial character development and motivation in the first act was missing and/or unclear. Now, I believe that story is just as important as visuals, and I’m worried that either the good folks at Disney won’t be able to animate any clarifying scenes in time, or that the very positive audience response thus far will make them decide not to bother. I’m don’t know much about the finer points of animation, so could anyone tell me about how long it would take to animate a single scene? I don’t want to have to worry about it all the way to the theater. Thanks!

  • Daniel

    I always take comments like Mike’s with a grain of salt, as they’re criticizing something they have not even seen (trailers and a couple of footages don’t count). They think they’re so insightful and intelligent assuming they know everything about the movie when in fact they only based their opinions on personal bias, assumptions and prejudgment. Talk about judging a book by its cover.

    Here’s an advice for you, Mr. Caracappa and those early naysayers:
    If you’re not actually working on the movie or be involved in the making process in any way, please shut up about it and save yourself from looking ignorant, because whatever you have to say about this movie will only end up sounding like hot air and nobody’s gonna take you seriuosly.

  • Franco Asedillo

    What’s the sound use in the trailer? is it from the movie?