Canadian Women in Animation

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The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will be holding it’s 11th annual Marc Davis Lecture (now known as the “Marc Davis Celebration of Animation”) on Wednesday October 17th. This year the topic is Canadian Women In Animation with a panel discussion featuring Oscar nominees Janet Pearlman, Wendy Tilby, Caroline Leaf, Amanda Forbis and last year’s Oscar winner, Torill Kove (The Danish Poet). Charles Solomon will moderate the panel and host the evening. The program will be presented at the Samuel Goldwyn Theatre in Beverly Hills, starting at 7:30pm. Tickets are $5 (students $3). Click for more info.


  • Chuck R.

    “Cinderella Penguin” was screened at the first Tournee of Animation I ever saw, I barely remember it, but I’d love to see it again. To me, “The Street” is a classic and can hold it’s own against any indy short, past and present. I wish I could comment on the others, but my question is this:

    Why do we always see films like these (as well as Joanna Quinn’s films) under the banner “Women in Animation?” Why can’t these filmmakers be treated like filmmakers —period? Aren’t these screenings just ghettoizing women in the industry the same way the Academy ghettoizes animation instead of treating it like film?

  • http://tangoland.com Cynthia

    “Why can’t these filmmakers be treated like filmmakers —period? Aren’t these screenings just ghettoizing women in the industry the same way the Academy ghettoizes animation instead of treating it like film?”

    Good point! As a “woman in animation” myself I would prefer to be seen as an artist, leave my sex out of it. It does continue to marginalize the presence of women in the business, although I think the idea is to “empower thru exclusivity”. I never attend “women in animation” events as I don’t feel being a woman makes me any more special, unique or in need of exclusive meetings or events. I just want to draw.

    Plus…are women really in that much of a need of special tailor made events and support? It seems to me that animation is very female oriented today, especially with the glut of shows were the boys always play the stupid, subordinate characters to the more gutsy, smart and athletically inclined girls. We gals have enough representation in this biz as it is…even if it’s not entirely based in truth.

  • Heather

    It’s interesting that every director on the panel was/is produced by the National Film Board’s animation studio in Montreal, Quebec. It might have been really fun to see a panel with more regional diversity (in terms of where they make their work in Canada) & racial diversity.

  • Chris L

    Oh man, When The Day Breaks is one of my favorite shorts. I saw it when I got the The Animation Show’s DVD. I had known it was animated by a woman but I never give that any thought to that when I watch something. I don’t think, “Oh wow, who would have thought this was made by a woman?” Its simply a wonderful short cartoon by a fantastic animator.

    Oh and to the comment about female oriented shows. I don’t care as long as it leads to interesting characters. If strong, interesting female characters and stupid, interesting male characters happen to be fashionable to the PC crowd, then whatever. Just don’t homogenize cartoons.

  • Lotte Ann Ratinger

    “We gals have enough representation in this biz as it is…even if it’s not entirely based in truth.”

    Hmmm… Quick! Name 5 big studio women directors! Name one female that owns/is CEO of a big studio!

    I would be surprised if most people could. Women are still grossly UNDERREPRESENTED in the biz, in the books, at universities, in anim mags, anim websites and onscreen. Sure, guys are earning off of creating gurrl characters and makin the guys look dumb sometimes. Who cares if they’re the ones takin home the bucks and glory?