CTN Expo to screen “The Illusionist”

Here’s another update from the folks at the upcoming CTN Expo: Sylvain Chomet’s The Illusionist is now set for an opening night advance screening, on Thursday November 18th. All advance pass holders will be admitted.

Also, it’s just been announced that Chris Wedge from BlueSky will be attending and speaking, as will Enrico Casarosa (story artist and illustrator at Pixar), Bobby Beck (no relation) from Animation Mentor, and HB Lewis (designer, illustrator, writer for Disney, BlueSky, DreamWorks). Pixar will host an animators panel again this year and yours truly, Jerry Beck, will moderate a discussion with the principals of Barcelona’s Headless Productions.

The CTN Expo II will be held November 19th-21st in Burbank. Word is the CTNX hotel (The Burbank Airport Marriott) is 93% sold out. Overflow rooms (at full rates) will open up, but if you are thinking of attending, book now and save. For more information, click here.


  • Miguel

    “The Illusionist loses his faith in his vocation. There is something shocking in the way he deliberately, angrily sabotages a trick with short and long pencils, thus upsetting and bewildering a little boy. But the real magic, the magic he has created, is happening behind his back, and under our noses. The Illusionist is an intricate jewel”.

    Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian, UK

    “That it is an animated film should not be any reason to doubt its place among those urban classics; indeed, it’s hard to imagine a more exquisitely crafted picture of Edinburgh’s gaunt, handsome streets, its weather, its light, even its traffic”.

    Anthony Quinn, The Independent, UK

    “The Illusionist also has some happy news about the enduring power of old things. Indeed, for some younger viewers, raised on Pixar, Chomet’s approach will seem so ancient that it becomes new again. An unqualified delight”.

    Donald Clarke, The Irish Times, Dublin

  • Miguel

    “The Illusionist also has some happy news about the enduring power of old things. Indeed, for some younger viewers, raised on Pixar, Chomet’s approach will seem so ancient that it becomes new again. An unqualified delight”.

    Donald Clarke, The Irish Times

    “That it is an animated film should not be any reason to doubt its place among those urban classics; indeed, it’s hard to imagine a more exquisitely crafted picture of Edinburgh’s gaunt, handsome streets, its weather, its light, even its traffic”.

    Anthony Quinn, The Independent

    “Admittedly, one has to adjust to the gentle, undemanding pace of this movie, which does not force its insights and meanings but allows them to meander into view, a pace which suddenly jolts into a higher gear when Chomet and Tati show us how The Illusionist loses his faith in his vocation. There is something shocking in the way he deliberately, angrily sabotages a trick with short and long pencils, thus upsetting and bewildering a little boy. But the real magic, the magic he has created, is happening behind his back, and under our noses. The Illusionist is an intricate jewel”.

    Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

  • http://www.sexymecha.com Hal

    Don’t know if this is the place to bring it up, but the CTN site is having some major problems loading on my end.

  • http://thatssokraven.livejournal.com/ Kelly Tindall

    *ugh* Super frustrating I can’t go! The Expo has so much fantastic stuff happening this year, they might as well bring Satoshi Kon back from the dead, declare that they’ve found a previously-undiscovered fifties Disney movie, and give everyone who attends a free drawing from Hayao Miyazaki.

  • David Mackenzie

    I ended up seeing this when it played here (a couple of weeks ago). It was pretty much what I expected, maybe slightly less entertaining than Belleville Rendezvous.

    I’m not the biggest fan of Sylvian Chomet’s stuff because of its “plodding” tendency, everything is slightly “twee” to an extent. I won’t spoil anything, but I will say that the film had a much bigger impact on me in the last parts.

    The best thing he’s ever done is still the 1930s-styled intro to Belleville, though…

  • http://robtheanderson.blogspot.com Rob Anderson

    I saw this at TIFF a few weeks ago and was very impressed. Some of the CG took me out of the story but I am willing to forgive that aspect for the emotional ride it took me on. I love stories that work with little or no dialogue and this one does it very well.
    I will see it again at OIAF!

  • Flipper

    “I wish The Illusionist were funny, but it isn’t”.

    “A film whose too-manifest agenda, at the outset, is to break our hearts causes a sceptical spectator to apply sealant to that organ from Scene 1″.

    Nigel Andrews FT

    “Sadly all their work is in the service of an unappealing story that recycles the old “tears of a clown” cliché and expects us to mourn the passing of things that probably weren’t that great to begin with”.

    “The film clearly wants us to feel something akin to profound sadness about the magician’s plight, but once you strip away the wow factor of the film’s design, the absence of strong characterisation ensures the end result is less affecting than was perhaps intended”.

    Alistair Harkness. The Scotsman

    “But the problem with The Illusionist is we get all his (Tati’s)usual themes and routines without the great man himself, and it was really him that made it all work”.

    “Chomet’s animation is at times beautiful, but the film is full of anachronistic touches and seems to take an almost perverse pleasure in its relentless glumness”.

    Paul Whitington, Irish Independent