Enchanted weekend

giselle.jpg

Disney’s Enchanted is a blockbuster hit. The critics are raving and there is Oscar buzz swirling for its star, Amy Adams.

In addition to the film’s obvious tributes to Disney past, the film is loaded with hidden references that only the truly geeky – and readers of Cartoon Brew – would get. A whole list of the them (four pages) was post by Kansas City.com.

The film sends up Disney cliches, but does so with respect and class. What’s more, it’s reminding audiences of what Disney-style hand drawn animation looks like in movie theatre. I can only wonder, might the film’s accomplishments – along with success of The Simpsons Movie and the upcoming Persepolis – lead to an actual theatrical resurgence of traditional cartoon animation?


  • purin

    The movie was a lot of fun. I was worried about the nature of the humor, but, as you said, it was done with respect and class, and filled with those little jokes that aren’t in your face.

    The animation could have been better, yeah, but I still enjoyed that section of the movie, with its happy pretty princess colors and art nouveau-type influence.

  • http://www.jessica-plummer.com Jessica Plummer

    I had the pleasure of stopping by James Baxter’s studio twice during the development of the animation in Enchanted. I’m glad the movie sounds like it’s doing well off the bat – what I had seen during its production was a real treat. My biggest congrats to James and his crew for such beautiful animation!

  • Andrew

    Drat, now I have a gut feeling to WANT to see it! :)

    Congrats to them. I do hope all these films push people’s interest in 2D features all the more.

  • Floyd Norman

    Congratulations to James Baxter and his crew for the fine work in “Enchanted.”

    Having said that, it’s still a shame that the world’s premiere animation studio had to “outsource” production on the film. It’s a sad day when Disney animation can’t be done at Disney. Hopefully, that’s changing.

  • Tom Pope

    I cautiously believe this, as well as Princess & Frog, will kickstart high-end hand-drawn animation. I think Disney will be impressed, but they’ll never again have more than one movie in full production at once the way they did 8-10 years ago. It’d going to be a continuing “wait-and-see” situation. (Whew… lots of hyphens!)

  • http://www.awprunes.blogspot.com/ Larry Levine

    I hope audiences rediscover hand drawn animation.

    Much as I respect & enjoy Pixar’s incredible CGI work, IMO nothing can recreate the beauty & imagination of characters brought to life by a cartoonist’s pencil.

  • Mr. Semaj

    I loved Enchanted. I’m seriously thinking about seeing it a second time.

  • http://robcatview.blogspot.com robert

    I had read in several places that the new Goofy short was going to be shown with Enchanted so I was disappointed yesterday when it wasn’t there.

    Apparently this film has been in development for 15 years. I think Enchanted could have been a sensation if they had done it before Shrek came out, but after three Shreks it has a bit of a “me too” air to it, especially an item like the chipmunk turd joke which seemed an unecessary venture into dumbness.

  • red pill junkie

    As a straight, single guy, I know it is quite… awkward of me that I’m actually EAGER to see a movie about a princess

    Well, what are you gonna do, right? ;-)

    I can always shield myself by taking my little niece with me.

  • http://www.christianziebarth.com Christian

    “but they’ll never again have more than one movie in full production at once the way they did 8-10 years ago.”

    That might not be so bad. It was when they started to make too much at once that the perceived “specialness” of each film started to go down.

    “Much as I respect & enjoy Pixar’s incredible CGI work, IMO nothing can recreate the beauty & imagination of characters brought to life by a cartoonist’s pencil.”

    Fortunately the Pixar guys never wanted to see hand-drawn die out either. Sure they were (and are) making their CGI films but it was never *their* intent to destroy hand-drawn.

  • james

    I hope this inspires more hand drawn animation too. With all the effects and techniques 2d can be as beautiful as any 3d creation. If you look at a 3d pipeline its hard to believe any art comes out after all that math and typing, sure you get digital eyelashs or something ridiculous like that but the passion, art, vision and magic are lost. viva la 2d!

    and check out the enchanted music video, they animate carrie underwood for the first and last parts http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nRGC720Qak&feature=bz303

  • http://wwww.vitaminsteve.com Steve Flack

    The Goofy short has been moved to the front of the new “National Treasure” movie to spread awareness of the new Disney short program beyond the animation community, who they believe would go see Enchanted anyway. This way, now that group will also go see “National Treasure”

  • http://www.tomsito.com Tom Sito

    Congratulations to all the Enchanted team. The animation does look beautiful.

    I wonder that someone yet hasn’t done an interview with Kevin Lima and Brenda Chapman-Lima as a husband/wife team of directors?
    Brenda was head of story on Lion King and co-director of Prince of Egypt and is developing a feature at PIXAR. Kevin co-directed Tarzan, then did 102 Dalmations and now Enchanted.

  • http://www.reviewsofthings.blogspot.com Ladytink_534

    I sure hope it does!

  • http://www.awprunes.blogspot.com/ Larry Levine

    “Fortunately the Pixar guys never wanted to see hand-drawn die out either. Sure they were (and are) making their CGI films but it was never *their* intent to destroy hand-drawn.”

    No question that John Lasseter & Brad Bird have oftened expressed their love for hand-drawn animation, if I remember correctly Bird originally wanted to make The Incredibles traditionally.

    But the fact is hand drawn animation is on life support & much as it needs great talents like Eric Goldberg with pencil in hand–it also needs GREAT SCRIPTS to survive (Treasure Planet anyone??).

  • Richard Hudson

    That comprehensive list forgot to mention that when Edward changes the tv station and you can’t see what’s on tv, you can hear “Pink Elephants On Parade” playing.

  • Paul N

    I don’t know why I hoped that maybe, just maybe, people would refrain from beating the “2D is back” drum if this movie did well in it’s first week. I should have known better; the same knees started jerking this summer when “The Simpsons” had a great opening weekend. Didn’t seem to matter to anyone that Simpsons was a pre-sold property, just like it doesn’t seem to matter that there is a long live-action movie in the middle of those brief 2D bookends.

    No one would love to see a 2D resurgence more than me, but it’s a bit of a reach to think that this movie doing well means anything of significance for the future of 2D. Me, I’ll wait and see how “Princess and the Frog” does before I start thumping that drumhead.

    And some of you need to repeat after me: “It’s not 3D’s fault, it’s not 3D’s fault…” You know who you are…

  • greg manwaring

    I think Disney were smart to put the animation into the hands of one of Disney’s top animation talents (even though he’s not there anymore)!! James, and his crew, have lovingly given this show all they have and does justice to the great 2d films of the past!

  • Floyd Norman

    I hate to say it, but there’s still an attitude (even at Disney) that 2-D animation has to “prove itself.”

    Can you imagine any live-action producer with that attitude? That live-action film making has to show that its viable?

    Disney should focus on making good films –not whether these films can find a market. Success comes from doing your job well, not about “streamlining” the process.

  • http://members.shaw.ca/petemslie/index.htm Pete Emslie

    Back when I started seeing the trailer for “Enchanted”, I must admit I was expecting something more in the cynical, irreverent “Shrek” vein, and I wasn’t sure that I would enjoy the result. Having just returned from seeing it today, I’m overjoyed to say that the film itself is so much better than the trailer had me believe. In fact, I am overcome at the sheer wonderfulness of “Enchanted”! Amy Adams was just note-perfect as a real live equivalent to the animated Disney princess of yore, and James Marsden was great too, even if he seemed to be the butt of the joke quite often. It is indeed a triumphant return of Disney traditional animation in the bookend sequences of the film. Looks like the whole team behind this film provided the necessary “True Love’s Kiss” to awaken this “Sleeping Beauty” of an art form. My thanks to all involved in the making of “Enchanted” – you’ve done Disney proud!

  • http://www.thepra.com.au Eddie

    Yeah looks really clever. Its about time Disney 2d features loosened up a bit. I hope there is a resuragnce in 2d features. Our studio, The People’s Republic Of Animation are in the midst of developing one entire 2d feature (with no cg at all), all animated in the new photoshop. I think the world of cg features needs 2d features to ‘keep them honest’

  • http://inklingstudio.typepad.com David Nethery

    “But the fact is hand drawn animation is on life support & much as it needs great talents like Eric Goldberg with pencil in hand–it also needs GREAT SCRIPTS to survive (Treasure Planet anyone??).”

    Right.

    Larry, I know you may have not meant it that way, but I’m tired of hearing that particular drum beat , too .

    Everyone : live-action, stop-motion, hand-drawn and CG needs great scripts to survive too . (Bee Movie anyone ? , Happily Never After anyone ? The Ant Bully anyone ?, The Barnyard anyone? , Robots anyone ? can I stop now ? )

    What traditional hand-drawn animation mostly needs to survive right now is (true) great scripts , and also let’s get out from under this “2D is on life support” doom-and-gloom negative thinking . One of the guys who pontificated that “2D is Dead” wants to make a Bazooka Joe movie now . Right . So what ? Animation survives. Animation goes on . Tell Marjane Satrapi that 2D is on “life-support” . Tell Sylvain Chomet that 2D is on life-support.
    Tell it to Miyazaki-San .

    To end on a completely positive note: congratulations to James Baxter and Crew to a wonderful job on the hand-drawn animation in Enchanted . And congrats too for director Kevin Lima .

  • Mr. Semaj

    “Having said that, it’s still a shame that the world’s premiere animation studio had to “outsourceâ€? production on the film. It’s a sad day when Disney animation can’t be done at Disney.”

    Well, since most of your outsourcing animators here were Disney alumni, and most moviegoers don’t know about the outsourcing, I’d call this particular instance a win.

  • Matt Sullivan

    I saw it. I liked it a lot, except I could have done without that one shot of the CG chipmunk projectile-pooping. That just threw a big brick wall up in front of the story…

  • Matt Sullivan

    One more thing. I don’t believe this will “kick-start” hand drawn animation. Why?

    MONEY.

    CG films are faster and cheaper to make. Sorry. it’s the simple truth.

  • http://wardomatic.blogspot.com Ward

    Saw the film tonight with my entire family and we had a great time. Well, my 3 year-old son had a hard time staying still, but that’s to be expected. Anyway, I thought that the animation was great. (Why do you think that the animation “could’ve been better”, purin??? That’s a strange thing to say, what with James Baxter & Co. doing some incredible work…) The art direction for the animated segments was colorful, rich and fluid. Some wonderful stuff. Love the art nouveau look as well.

    And the only wrinkle for me was the chipmunk dropping a pellet, too. Seemed a little off to me. (My daughter thought it was funny, so I guess that’s why it’s in there.)

    Great job, guys. I’m impressed.

  • http://voyagesextraordinaires.blogspot.com Cory The Raven

    “But the fact is hand drawn animation is on life support & much as it needs great talents like Eric Goldberg with pencil in hand–it also needs GREAT SCRIPTS to survive (Treasure Planet anyone??).”

    Hey, I liked TREASURE PLANET! It’s problem was just that it was 5 years ahead of the sub-cultural curve that would have really appreciated it. (which puts it about 7 years ahead of when it might have been really profitable) Yeah the story was ho-hum, but so is ANY story about a princess finding true love… It’s not what you have, but what you do with it. Filmmaking in general, and animation especially, is a visual medium and requires visual storytelling. The unfortunate wildcard is public taste.

    I think TREASURE PLANET is a fantastic movie whose praises are unsung because Newsweek didn’t start writing articles about Steampunk until 2006. I can think of a few other masterpieces that went unrecognized at the time *cough*FANTASIA*cough*… It just takes culture a while to catch up to some things. In the North American case, despite three decades of anime, animation that isn’t fairy tales and cute animals.

    That’s also why I’m not surprized that ENCHANTED is doing well, but I am a little worried about THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG. I know I’m going to see it moreso because of the 1920′s New Orleans setting than the fairy tale aspect, (love Disney-era fairy tales, don’t care about Eisner-era fairy tales) but I worry that this setting will put it in the same class as the late Eisner “experimental” films like TREASURE PLANET, ATLANTIS, POCAHONTAS, BROTHER BEAR and HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME that don’t seem to be on most people’s list of memorable classics… I hope I’m wrong, but people might not “get” it the way they’ll “get” ENCHANTED and RAPUNZEL.

  • http://zekeyspaceylizard.blogspot.com Zekey

    Why is it every post on the brew becomes a debate where everyone agrees but continue to bicker as if they dont? And why is it always the 2d vs CG debate?

    I saw this today with some friends. It was pretty great. Funny. It reminded me alot of Hocus Pocus. And the music was pretty.
    Definitely worth the price of admission.
    My favorite bit was how the CG chipmunk pantomimed his story to the Prince. One of those rare times where a photorealistic CG animal actual looks cute and alive.
    Really wonderful musical film.

  • http://www.awprunes.blogspot.com/ Larry Levine

    Disney needs to go back to it’s roots & give audiences great CHARACTERS that we can care about & believe are real–not flat caricatures with recognizable celebrity voices.

    What made a hand drawn feature like Lilo & Stitch so enjoyable is that it was the vision of Chris Sanders, not a studio commitee (as the old expression goes “a camel is a horse put together by a commitee). Imagine if Chuck Jones had listened to Eddie Seltzer’s suggestions .

    Make ‘em fun again & audiences will go see it!

  • purin

    Ward… I’m not exactly sure. I admit I’m not knowledgeable enough to be able to go on for pages about good and bad animation, what makes bad design, etc. I’m just a viewer and a fan. It was really more of a feeling I got that something was “off” somehow, that it wasn’t all it could be. It still looked really good in motion and I loved the colors and art direction (except maybe I would have tweaked the character designs a touch)… Maybe, after picking up the general tone of animation blogs, I was expecting everyone to be negative and wanted to go along with it. I am ashamed.

    Speaking of such, I am dying to see some production and concept art! When and where will it ever show up (oh “coming soon” birds, how you mock me!)?

    Oh, yeah! I forgot about when Pip dropped a peanut. That definitely was not classy one bit. It was quite the mood killer, in fact. Tsk tsk.

  • http://inklingstudio.typepad.com David Nethery

    “CG films are faster and cheaper to make. Sorry. it’s the simple truth.”

    Not simple and I’m not convinced it’s true .

  • Woodrow Pace

    I join my Kudos and Accolades to those echoed throughout this thread. “Enchanted” is throughly and proudly “Walt’s” down to the tiniest details. It’s traditional in so many ways: traditional family, traditional marriage values, traditional idealism rediscovered, traditional musical making and, of course, traditional animation.

    And by “traditional animation” I mean that the creators use each available style of animation appropriately as it fits the story telling and to the best of each one’s ability. Hand drawn pencil to paper sweat and blood animation is beautifully captured with passion clearly visible in each frame. Graphed, modeled, en-fured and iridescently scaled animation is done perfectly according to the realistic and/or caricatured intent of the movie crafters. Special effects and computer generated environments draw (yes, draw) the viewer deeper into the experience and fantasy.

    This movie has it all and every art serves the final product well. Again, thanks for showing us how its supposed to be done. Here’s to doing it now again and again and again . . . and I don’t necessarily mean in sequels.

  • http://gagaman.blogspot.com The Gagaman

    Interesting to see all the good words this film has been getting, considering how much the trailer made me cringe. Now if only that Goofy short was part of it’s screening this would be a dead cert for going to see at the cinema when we eventually get it in the UK for me, as I need an excuse to go see a princess movie..

  • Floyd Norman

    “Well, since most of your outsourcing animators here were Disney alumni, and most moviegoers don’t know about the outsourcing, I’d call this particular instance a win.”

    We agree, but you’re missing my point. The animation was done outside Disney. Would Walt think that was a cool idea?

  • Bob

    The Goofy short has been moved to National Treasure 2?

    That’s just great, now I have less reason too see Enchanted, and might as well skip it, and there’s no way I’m paying to a ticket for National Treasure just to see a goofy short.

  • Greg Ehrbar

    My entire family loved Enchanted. I have never been this delighted by a Disney release since Roger Rabbit. At the time, Roger Rabbit signaled a new age for animation, cartoon characters, and maybe Disney itself. Unfortunately, things became, umm, “complicated” at Disney and nothing ever came of the film’s success, though its impact was felt in many ways.

    That said, Roger Rabbit was a dark film with a hard, cynical edge — a quality that worked in the film, but perhaps not so well in films that followed. In seems that dark, bitter, sarcastic, cynical attitudes have affected many, though not all, 2D and CG films over the past several years. Even Shrek seemed to be a reaction to disillusionment with the whole fairy tale thing that was becoming institutional and commercial rather than inspired.

    Then along comes Enchanted — with a true Disney fan and animation veteran at the helm. It breaks all the rules of modern filmmaking — it’s a happy, positive, celebration of Disney joy, and it means it!

    I have seen so many spoofs of fairy tales, from Saturday Night Live sketches and the goofball sitcom “The Charmings” to Shrek and Ella Enchanted (which fell victim to the Shrek route) — and I can really appreciate how astonishing Amy Adams’ performance is. She never becomes a one-note joke, never a bubbleheaded, blank-eyed ditz. It is amazing and a marvel to see her character evolve, all the while getting every movement, every expression, every nuance, absolutely spot-on as a genuine Disney princess.

    Whether this ushers in a 2D rennaissance is anyone’s guess. But I hope it ushers in an era in which Disney embraces the strengths, heritage and emotional ties with the public that seemed to be an “un-coolâ€? embarrassment in the not-too-distant past.

    As to the post about whether Enchanted might have been made a few years earlier, it must be noted that the script has been in development for at least a decade. At one point the script was much darker and less wholesome (apparently Giselle was supposed to pop out of a cake at a Bachelor party when she entered the real world, and the party guests were to assume she was a stripper). An Enchanted made a few years ago, when Disney was a very different Disney than it is even now, would have been perhaps more of a Pretty Woman type film.

    Best of all, even Pete Emslie likes it! Way to go, Pete!

  • Floyd Norman

    When Disney is allowed to be true to itself, and not what bone-headed executives want it to be, they’ll succeed.

    I hope they’ve learned their lesson this time around.

  • Erik

    My wife, nephew and my sister and I saw it today! It’s a great, cute and funny film. We loved it! Beautiful work 2D, 3D and the live action mix was outstanding! If they make a sequel I might just check that out.

  • Steve G

    Just saw it with the family and all loved it…though, oddly enough, my 13 year-old daughter liked it least. She is 13 , after all.

    THE best thing of the move was Amy Adams. Head and shoulders above all else. She made an impossible and easily screwed part sing and made the whole film work. She should be nominated.I don’t know if I could’ve sat through this without Amy Adams.

    Baxter’s animation was excellent and worked wonderfully. But that’s no real surprise…is it?

    Least favorite part of the film?…Susan Sarandon. If only they could’ve removed half her dialogue (and mugging) – and all of her dialogue once she turned into the dragon. I thought she’d never shut-up and stopping explaining the movie’s obvious plot points.
    But in spite of Sarandon and the obvious drastic cuts that were made to keep the length down they have a solid crowd pleaser. James Marsden was also teetering on the edge of not working, but he was close enough.
    There was plenty of applause from the matinee I attended. Kudos to all involved. It all came together splendidly and should have good legs.

  • Josh

    “Would Walt think that was a cool idea?”

    Walt’s dead. Has been for quite some time. The sooner Disney stop with the “What Would Walt Do” Mantra for animation the sooner they’ll start making good films again. Of course there are still a lot of other things that need fixing but that’s just one of the backwards thinking mindsets that needs to be swept away.

  • Paul N

    “The sooner Disney stop with the “What Would Walt Doâ€? Mantra for animation the sooner they’ll start making good films again.”

    Perhaps, but that wasn’t Floyd’s point. He was talking about outsourcing, not story decisions, filmmaking, or anything else.

  • Murray Bain

    “Walt’s dead. Has been for quite some time.”

    so is william shakespeare. No harm in honouring innovative thinkers.

    You know who is just like walt? Nobody. He started the place, and it carries HIS name as a brand, what’s wrong with following his vision? (unfortunately for us, to joe punch clock it also means “animation” but that’s another battle.)

    Mr. Norman was making amazing contributions when Walt running the place, so when he invokes his name it means something…back when Disney was real magic.

    The disney brand is built on nostalgia; Walt made films about old fashioned values; we have enough “in yo’ face new school thinking” we don’t need it from the mouse.
    It would be nice to go back to the past. Now that we’re here,”tommorrowland” sucks.
    Fairytales sound pretty good right now.

  • Mr. Semaj

    “The sooner Disney stop with the “What Would Walt Doâ€? Mantra for animation the sooner they’ll start making good films again. ”

    They did back in the 80′s, but for the past decade, they strayed too far from their roots and began dismantling their own heritage (making sequels for the sake of it, not letting animators control their own projects, etc.), which they’re now recovering from.

    What Disney needs to continue prospering is to move forward (like Meet the Robinsons taught us), but stay true to itself (like Enchanted is teaching us).

  • Charles

    Great movie. I’m going to have to buy this when it comes out. Also the 2D animation was amazing!

  • http://www.maichuntang.org.cn 22aaa

    Interesting to see all the good words this film has been getting, considering how much the trailer made me cringe. Now if only that Goofy short was part of it’s screening this would be a dead cert for going to see at the cinema when we eventually get it in the UK for me, as I need an excuse to go see a princess movie..

  • http://http:bobbypontillas.com Bobby Pontillas

    It was great to see that caliber of 2D on the big screen again, I would pay full price to watch just those. Beautiful work!

  • C. Edwards

    I completely agree (with Mr. Pontillas)! I thought it was really fun and the animation was GREAT. In fact, I wish Disney would just make a 2-D picture that looked like that! With everyone spoofing the “Disney/Fairy Tale” genre, Disney should just go the opposite direction and make a incredibly beautiful, insanely lush saccharine sweet fairy tale musical stripped of all anachronism and irony. Disney’s biggest problem is their attempts to be cool, hip and modern (adding extreme sports references to “Tarzan” and “Treasure Planet”, old disco songs to “Chicken Little”, sports to “Hercules”, etc.)– it’s like when your parents try to use slang that’s six years old. I’m not saying every movie should be that way, just every once and a while do what you do best and give all those little girls out there another princess fantasy.

  • Steve K.

    - Matt Sullivan says:
    - One more thing. I don’t believe this will “kick-start� hand drawn
    - animation. Why?MONEY. CG films are faster and cheaper to make.
    - Sorry. it’s the simple truth.

    Ahahahahahahaha! You’re kidding right? Most of the 2D features made took less time, less money and smaller crews than almost all of the 3D productions going on now.

  • http://bobbypontillas.com Bobby Pontillas

    For those who are interested, I just wanted to share a link to the blog of story artist, Troy Quane, who worked on the film. Hes sharing some great concepts and various dev work from the film.

    http://troyquane.blogspot.com/

  • MattSullivan

    Steve, CG IS faster. If hand drawn were faster you woul;d have seen more films per year. Recent;y, there have been DOZENS of cg films…whereas it took certain studios upwards of 4 years to produce a hand drawn feature.

  • http://www.awprunes.blogspot.com/ Larry Levine

    “certain studios upwards of 4 years to produce a hand drawn feature”

    It takes up to 4 years because hand drawn features go thru committees until all creative juice is sucked out of them. What traditional animation needs to suvive is to bring back the unit system. Let the director set up his/her own team of animators, writers, layout artists, etc & create art, not slick over-blown productions wrongly second guessing what audiences want to see.

  • Paul N

    CG isn’t any faster than 2D. It still takes about the same amount of time from concept to release for a top-level CG feature, and costs about the same as a 2D film (back when 2D features were still being made, that is.) The time and money get spent differently in a CG film, but they’re still spent.

  • http://leoanimate.blogspot.com/ Leo Brodie

    I enjoyed this movie, more than I thought I would. It was carried by a strong script and a great performance by Amy Adams.

    But the film’s success should not be mistaken as another renaissance for hand-drawn animation. The animation itself was a workmanlike parody of much greater works.

    More tellingly: in the movie, “true love” is found in the real world. The losers move back to the cartoon world. The moral of this story doesn’t bode well for future animation works.

  • Christina S.

    “More tellingly: in the movie, “true loveâ€? is found in the real world. The losers move back to the cartoon world. The moral of this story doesn’t bode well for future animation works.”

    Sounds like someone’s taking things too literally~ I’m pretty sure the moral was more about how true love can exist outside fairy tales more than anything else. Also, they may live in different worlds, but the two couples consist of a ‘real’ person and a ‘cartoon’ person, so there isn’t really any separatism as you think.

    Anyway, as a 17-year-old Disney fangirl I rather enjoyed the film! It was certainly a lot better than expected. However, I’m not sure if it will spark a renaissance of 2D animation in theaters, and I’m not sure if that’s even a good thing. Honestly, I would prefer just one REALLY good 2D animated film released only every three years over a dozen mediocre ones released every six months.

  • Rick Farmiloe

    What the success of ENCHANTED tells us is that the public will embrace any form of animation as long as the quality’s there and the story is strong. It was short sided producers who prematurely read hand drawn animation it’s last rights……but hopefully, they will see that the world of animation is big enough for 2D and 3D. There have been PLENTY of rotten 3D films that failed to dispell the myth that people will only accept 3D. Hopefully, ENCHANTED will be a step in the right direction. Kevin and James are to be congratulated on a great job!! The Goofy short would have fit right in with this. It really feels ‘classic’ and retro without feeling ‘old fashioned.’ Maybe it’ll be on the DVD release. In the meantime, I say, “Draw it…and they will come.â€?

  • Paul N

    “What the success of ENCHANTED tells us is that the public will embrace any form of animation as long as the quality’s there and the story is strong.”
    No, it doesn’t. You’d be hard-pressed to find anyone outside the industry who went to see “Enchanted” because of the animated bits. The bulk of the public went to see a family movie, or McDreamy on the big screen, or whatever, but they went to a LIVE ACTION MOVIE with animated segments, not an animated movie.

    I happen to agree that a well-made animated film is the key to attracting audiences, regardless of how many D’s it possesses, but the success of this film doesn’t do anything to prove that point.

  • Rick Farmiloe

    I agree that most people didn’t go to the movie for the animation…but the fact that the 2D was so successful I think audiences have responded favorably to the ‘traditional’ look of the animation and it might wet their appetite for more quality 2D, that’s all I meant.

  • purin

    I don’t know. From what I’ve been reading, the animated part had a big effect on people, not necessarily because they were animation fans waiting for Disney to get back in the game, but because they grew up with “classic” Disney, and the animated part served as a good reminder of something Disney hasn’t done in a long time. In those 15 minutes adults who grew up with the second golden age saw something they hadn’t in years, something they’d only seen shallower reminders of in Disney Princess merchandise. I think the demand for what Disney has been known to do best will increase because of that.

  • http://www.abelboddy.com C. Edwards

    I don’t even think audiences know what they are looking at in the first place. I had someone refer to “Ratatouille” as ‘hand drawn’ the other day, when I told them it wasn’t, they said “What’s the difference?”

    Does any of this really matter? Does anyone think if 2-D “re-emerged” that the movies will be any better than they were? Disney’s “return” to 2-D has already been announced and what is it? A fairy tale musical with songs by Randy Newman. Yeah, that sounds sooo different than the stuff people got tired of before. And the average 3-D movie that comes out is pretty unspectacular.

  • http://robcatview.blogspot.com robert

    Disney’s “return� to 2-D has already been announced and what is it? A fairy tale musical with songs by Randy Newman. Yeah, that sounds sooo different than the stuff people got tired of before.

    No, it was the fairy tale musicals with songs by Phil Collins that people were tired of before. A completely different thing.

    I hardly see anyone say it but I really felt the Disney musicals got derailed after Howard Ashman died. It seemed like he was the magic element of good taste that no amount of executive management or focus group testing could duplicate.

  • http://portapuppets.does.it uncle wayne

    Alas! Alas!! Tonite I went!!

    And as 54 year old….i laffed thoughout…i cried throughout!! I haven’t been that enthralled in a film since “Sound of Music” and/or “Jurrassic!”

    Just so so SO superb!! In every angle & aspect!

  • http://members.shaw.ca/petemslie/index.htm Pete Emslie

    C. Edwards said: “I don’t even think audiences know what they are looking at in the first place. I had someone refer to “Ratatouilleâ€? as ‘hand drawn’ the other day, when I told them it wasn’t, they said “What’s the difference?â€?
    Does any of this really matter? Does anyone think if 2-D “re-emergedâ€? that the movies will be any better than they were?”

    I’ve no doubt that there are some poor souls who are clueless about the difference between CG and traditional animation. But I think the majority of filmgoers recognize the two media as being different, whether or not they have a preference for one over the other. However, in answer to your question – yes it DOES matter. As wonderful as Pixar’s films have been in recent years, there are many of us who still prefer to watch the magic of a hand-drawn cartoon image seemingly spring to life on the big screen. That is what inspired me and all of my friends of a similar age to pursue either animation or, in my case, print cartooning as a career.

    The bottom line is that there are many of us who love to watch characters emote in an expressive, fully animated fashion, and drawn cartoons satisfy that urge for us more than CG. It has nothing to do with how well done or not the CG is, but rather, that we just aesthetically prefer an animated DRAWING. The two media should be able to peacefully co-exist alongside each other, as people like John Lasseter and Brad Bird have always understood and agreed with. The problem is the idiot studio execs who feel that CG is superior to drawn animation for the simple, misguided reason that the former more closely follows the conventions of live-action filmmaking than the latter. They’ve never been able to come to terms with the fact that many animation fans have a decided preference for the magic that is inherent in a drawn cartoon with that “Illusion of Life”. Yes, there is a difference!!! Hopefully, the success of “Enchanted” will prove that Disney traditional animation still has a huge following that will remain ever-faithful to that craft.

  • Jorge Garrido

    I’d much rather watch a Pixar CGI film than a modern Disney hand drawn film, and I HATE CGI.

  • C. Edwards

    Well, of course there’s a difference to us.

    The real bottom line is that there aren’t enough of us to change anything with just “love”.

  • http://members.shaw.ca/petemslie/index.htm Pete Emslie

    “The real bottom line is that there aren’t enough of us to change anything with just “loveâ€?.”

    I believe there are. And we’re now voting through the box-office receipts of “Enchanted”. I also predict that vote will be reinforced on the opening weekend of “The Princess and the Frog” as well.

  • C. Edwards

    Okay. “Enchanted” will change our traditionally animated lives and the next fairy tale musical will rock our existences to the core. Sure, whatever you say. I give in.

    I’m going to go sit in that other part of the room where people don’t expect multi-million dollar studios and fickle audiences to make my life better.

  • http://www.johnbludwick.com J Ludwick

    I’ve read the posts here with great fascination, and what I got was, “Walt is gone BUT we need to honor his philosophy”, “2d may come back BUT does it matter?”, “hats off to the team that created Enchanted BUT they were outsourced BUT it was still a victory BUT it won’t bring back 2D BUT it might….”
    On CG talk, the same arguments rear their ugly head. But inbetween the balanced realists lay the block-headed 3D zealots, who think that 2D can never come back in the face of the superior 3D. What’s with all the animation Nazis? But they do have a point. A well-designed, 3D character model can be animated well by someone who doesn’t know how to draw. And the model will have it’s visual consistency (even if that visual sucks) no matter who animates it. Motion capture will eventually be cheap, all technology drops in price eventually. What this amounts to is cheaper, repurposeful animation. A real bargain!
    That, to me, means that REAL animators will be more precious than ever. It’s an exercise in contrasts.
    Traditional animation, beautiful, compelling, and inspirational, fell dead because it cost more than it could make. The true murderer of 2D animation was the The Lion King. With that behemoth, I imagine a lot of raises were passed out – even though it’s popularity may have been a fluke. I don’t think 3D is to blame for that. Now, with the same haughtiness that got us here, we sing praises of the second coming of 2D while forgetting that subtle point of the past. Hollywood is a business, the business of entertainment. And while the pawns argue down below, the chessmasters continue to move the pieces where the money is. I mean – shall I mention “Hoodwinked”? It cost about 23 million and it made 60 but they sacrificed their reputation, too. If any one of the commentators here is willing to die of starvation to make a “good” 2D film – well, then – make it. Part of balancing a professional artistic life is making the best possible vision while still eating and maintaining the good life your inherently picky tastes demand.
    Bottom line: Moviegoers just want to escape, and their inherent tastes are just fine with whatever they see and are rarely disappointed. Producers want to make money. Artists want to see good work and are passionate about it. The three worlds must always be reconciled to one another – and this site largely represents only one of those worlds. It’s not only but also.

  • PCUnfunny

    Is that old woman to suppose to be like the evil witch in SNOW WHITE ? If she is, her design looks extremely bland compared to the original counterpart.

  • http://www.husbandlaw.com Paul Husband

    Hooray for real quality in the 2D animation in Enchanted. Humor executed visually. Wow! What a concept. Three cheers for James Baxter and his crew.

  • http://www.cartoonbrew.com/featurefilm/enchanted-weekend Merissa

    I Love Enchanted…………. because It’s my favorite movie.
    Princess And The Frog is coming out soon in 2009. Kit Movie is
    Coming out in July. My Friend Faith want to go see Enchanted
    On November 21st 2007….. I didn’t go see it. but Faith And
    Noelle And Amy Green Wert went to see Enchanted. Faith
    Loves Enchanted Movie. It is 48 Minutes. I love Stuff Because I’m
    a Big Girl. I’m in Third Grade Now. Next Year, I will Be in
    Fourth Grade. Girls Want Enchanted Treat Bags With Bracelet,
    Doll From Enchanted, Necklace, brush, American Girl Magazines,
    Just Like You Doll From American Girl For my girls From Mrs.
    Landschoot’s Class. I’m Going To Get For The Boys……………………….. Is Boys Treat Bags With Toy, Fourth
    Pack, Tickets To See Playhouse Disney Live On Tour And a
    The Polar Express Book(from The Original book collection)
    Sincerely,
    Merissa