“Supreme Sunlight” by Kim Asendorf

The aerospace industry doesn’t seem to do much nowadays in the way of
inspiring people with futuristic space-inspired art, but filmmakers have filled that void by making innovative use of NASA’s archive of public domain images and video. Take for instance Chris Abbas’s Cassini Mission stop motion film or the above music video “Supreme Sunlight” by German artist Kim Asendorf.

The video, which celebrates the awe of space shuttle lift-offs, is an eye-catching experimental piece that teeters on the abstract/representational border. The composition it accompanies is “Foam on the Waves of Space-Time” by a.d.l.r. (aka Nick Morera). Whether Asendorf’s distortions qualify as animation or not, his pixel sorting technique done with Processing has relevance and applications to the progressive animation artist.

Asendorf also created a pixel art generator for the iPhone/iPad called ASDFBMP that makes it easy for artists to create their own generative artwork.

(via Jeff Scher’s Twitter)


  • http://www.aaronpickens.com Aaron

    Awesome! It’s great to see artists producing work that can inspire a new generation of individuals who will pursue advances in space flight.

    • B.Bonny

      inspire a new generation of individuals who will pursue advances in space flight.

      Or at least join the hide bound careerist space bureaucracy.

      NASA = Disney 2d animation = Big Bear Aircraft company

      • http://www.aaronpickens.com Aaron

        Although there maybe some truth to that comparison, NASA is still working towards great things… http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/mpcv/. Or we may have to simply have hope in the independent space entrepreneurs such as Virgin Galactic and SpaceX to take mankind on another great adventure.

  • B.Bonny

    The aerospace industry doesn’t seem to do much nowadays in the way of inspiring people with futuristic space-inspired art . .

    I thought artists were supposed to do that. Which begs the question, where were all the artists during the 30 years or so the Shuttle was flying? And only now, that it’s canceled, does it become worthy of recognizing the inherent beauty on a number of levels?