“The Kandinsky Effect” by Manu Meyre

Something for the fine art buffs: a music promo for The Kandinsky Effect using a piece of art by their namesake.

CREDITS
Director and motion designer : Manu Meyre
Painter : Vassily Kandinsky, Composition VIII (1923)
Music: The Kandinsky Effect, “Girl/Boy Song” (edit)

(via Fashion Buddha’s Twitter)


  • http://kecky.blogspot.com kecky

    Oh man, my very first project when learning AfterEffects was an animation based on Kandinsky’s work. My skills weren’t really up to it. I’m glad somebody else animated him way better than I could, because I think his work just lends itself to animation so fabulously!!!

    • Sat

      His work lends to animation, yes, but I don’t see it as motion graphics (like the later russian/soviet painters, which is even somewhat the starting point of motion graphs, I think), the forms should move, be drawn, have some distortions, dance a bit maybe. I feel like Kandinsky’s work are about rhythm, the way things relate to each other, it’s not as bold or stylish.

      I’m no art buff, so that’s just my opinion, how I would animate it. The short here is still beautiful to look at, and I simply take it as playing with Kandinsky’s work!

  • Katella Gate

    I liked this. It would make a great TV bumper for a “movie of the week” show. It also had the good sense not to go on for too long and wear out its welcome.

  • The Gee

    Pretty cool. I agree it could have gone on for too long. And that it could have been a little bit more than it is. But, I like it as is, too.

  • http://www.animatress.com Ashanti

    Color me inspired!

  • The Gee

    If I said this aloud, it might sound stupid:

    I do kind of wish they had found a story in the art, in the painting.
    If they had done that perhaps it would have been even better.

    Still, as motion graphics based upon an established work goes it was re-constructed in an interesting manner. Surely, it serves its purpose, as a piece goes.

  • http://www.enigmation.de slowtiger

    NIce piece of work, but in a way quite unrelated to Kandinsky – you could exchange every element with some artwork of another artist and still get a spot which works. It’s a generic way to disassemble a painting, spread its elements in space, rush through with the camera and reassemble it in the end – but MTV logos did that in the 80′s already, all the time.

    On the other hand, it’s nice to see some motion graphic using something else than now-fashionable vector shapes, visually.

  • http://www.borishiestand.com Boris Hiestand

    absolutely lovely!

  • http://www.michaelspornanimation.com/splog/ Michael Sporn

    Abstract Art should remain ABSTRACT. Kandinsky had hard edged lines, and Manu Meyre puts them out of focus so it can look like some kind of multiplane distortion. It’s as much a disappointment as was Oskar Fischinger’s work for Disney, when THEY tried to turn his spatial relationships into object animation.

    • The Gee

      Well, that presents some way to go about the nuts and bolts of figuring out a story.

      I agree, I expected more than just pre-formed shapes and designs being put into place like a puzzle.

      Perhaps the fuzziness you are noting–which I’m guessing is After Effects in action?–could have instead been the parts of the painting being painted. It could have been constructed using brush strokes for the bulk of the animation. If done deftly, it would not have needed to be monotonous or anything. But, it would have allowed for “dancing” with the music and finding that “story” I mentioned earlier.

      Could have….but obviously what I’m mentioning is just an option.

      I still feel like it probably met the goals of the project and works for the purpose of the project. It just could have been more if done differently.

  • http://www.iotacenter.org Jeremy Speed Schwartz

    It seems like motion graphics technology has really expanded the variety of imagery in abstract animation.

    Just saw the Punto y Raya (dot and line) festival in Los Angeles last night– there are some really amazing things coming out of the confluence of technology, animation and abstraction. I’m heading out again tonight for the PyR retrospective at Echo Park Film Center.

  • AJ

    it is not hard to imagine this in a gallery on a loop, brilliant

  • http://www.manumeyre.fr Manu Meyre

    Hey !
    Thanks to Amid for posting my video, and thanks to all of you guys for commenting it. Since it’s my first personnal motion design project (made all alone in my room), your opinion (positive or negative) and/or support are important to me.
    Let me tell you a few things about it.
    First, I didnt want to make something directly related to kandinsky or to the way he works. I chose Kandinsky because his paintings are very graphical, with a lot of shapes and lines. Plus, his paintings are not flat (to me). There’s a lot of depth, even if the lines keep being sharp. It was perfect to make a 2D animation in a 3D world. I only put focus, cause it would be quite uggly if everything was sharp while it’s animated.
    The original idea was to re-interpret the painting, listening to the music. Nowadays, everybody has a mp3 player. We can listen to music almost everywhere and everytime. I dont know for you guys, but for me, it changes my vision of things. To give simples examples : things around me look a bit sader if the song is sad. I walk faster if the beat is fast. Like a double exposure in photo, I have a double emotion. This animation is a kind of vision : watch the painting while listening to music.
    Sine it’s a re-interpretation of the painting, I only use elements of Composition VIII. No more or less. No extra lines or shapes. The idea was to build music objects with all of theses shapes (like we can do with Lego) : vynil player, speakers, partition… and so on.
    To my opinion, there is a story here. The vynil player appears from scratch, and as the music starts, each piece of the painting appears. As this vision is linked to the music, you can see instruments, and differents music objects. Finally, the painting is complete.
    Everybody has his own vision. Here is mine. But it’s just one possibility. I wanted something soft, with no extreme animations like distortions, or dancing objects. That sounds a bit lame to me. But I might be wrong, and if some of you guys want to try it another way, that’s cool. I’ll be glad to watch it.
    If you want to talk more about this, dont hesitate to email me.
    Cheers.
    Manu