25 Cartoonists You Should Know

For the past few days on Cartoon Brew’s Instagram account, we’ve been running a series called 25 Cartoonists You Should Know. The entire series is below, and yes, the list could easily be twice as long and still incomplete.

Meet Joyce Pensato And Her Expressionist Remixes of Cartoon Icons

Joyce Pensato (b. 1941, Brooklyn NY) has been painting cartoon characters for years. She takes icons of cartoon art—Felix the Cat, Donald Duck, Batman—and renders them in smudgy charcoal and pastel or runny enamel paint. She works mostly in black and white, occasionally introducing silver and gold for contrast. Though her work seems grounded more in graffiti art, she actually draws from fine art history, from the likes of the Abstract Expressionists, and Philip Guston, who was also influenced by comics.

Fox Is Scrapping Its Late-Night Animation Block ADHD

Fox’s experiment with late-night animation didn’t go as well as they had anticipated. The network will end its Saturday late-night animation block ADHD (Animation Domination High-Def) in June, less than a year after it began. It was originally created as a replacement for the cancelled sketch comedy show “MADtv.”

Moonbot Studios Has Started to Develop Feature-Length Film Projects

The Oscar-winning Louisiana animation studio Moonbot recently announced that it is developing multiple feature-length film projects. It has acquired the film rights to two YA book series: the “Olivia Kidney” trilogy by Ellen Potter, which it plans to do as a live-action/animation hybrid; and “The Extincts” by Veronica Cossanteli.

Animated Fragments #26

Animated Fragments is our semi-regular feature of animation tests, experiments, micro-shorts, and other bits of cartoon flotsam that doesn’t fit into other categories. To view the previous 25 installments, go to the Fragments archive.

‘Steven Universe’ Recap: ‘Lion 2: The Movie’

This week’s “Steven Universe” dived into the whirlwind that is the mindset of an insecure youth, in ways that were similar to the episode “Lars and the Cool Kids.” At first, the episode didn’t really make any sort of impression on me. It took another viewing for me to grasp its depth—or at least theorize things in the whirlwind that in my own mind at 3am.

Next Wednesday in Brooklyn: Twillerama Animation Screening

Next Wednesday, the animated duo of Jeff Twiller and Randy J. Johnson will host their own animated film screening in Brooklyn. It’s a legit line-up of animated shorts, with perceptive cinematic commentary supplied inbetween the films by Twiller and Johnson. Thankfully, they happen to be animation experts.

Major Animation Exhibit ‘Watch Me Move’ Headed to Nashville

Any exhibition that “…aims to demonstrate the centrality of animation to contemporary global culture…” is worth our attention, and the UK’s Barbican Centre-produced “Watch Me Move: The Animation Show” has been doing that at museum venues since 2011. This June, it comes to the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville.

A Filmmaker Tests Out The NFB’s $1 Animation App, StopMo Studio

The NFB StopMo Studio app for the iPad provides essentially everything you need to jump into creating an animated film. You won’t have any issues getting comfortable with the user interface if you’ve worked with animation programs before, and it seems more than approachable for newcomers young and old. Once you open up the program, you’re welcomed with a short and succinct tutorial that covers the basic tools, and then opens up to allow you to explore the rest of the options available.

‘Sumo’ by Laurene Braibant

Two bodies, giants almost naked, advance slowly to a circle of clay. This graphic experience features the expressiveness of their bodies which are to repeat a sumo ritual. The two wrestlers are fighting in a lightning way through each of their deeds, which are the direct expression of their most exposed being.

Book Review: ‘Stray Dog of Anime: The Films of Mamoru Oshii’

I can remember looking at anime titles in British video catalogues back in the nineties; as the pastoral fantasies of Hayao Miyazaki would not reach prominence in this country until the new millennium, UK distributors placed a strong emphasis on futuristic thrillers. The films of Mamoru Oshii certainly fit that bill.