<em>Drift</em> by Theo Tagholm <em>Drift</em> by Theo Tagholm

Drift by Theo Tagholm

The dreamlike morphing imagery in Drift creates a mysterious and original style of movement that I haven’t seen before in any time-lapse/pixilation work. “Stop motion tilt shift meets tracking,” in the words of the director Theo Tagholm, who made it with a Canon G9 still camera and After Effects.

(via Kottke)

  • andy

    Wonderful! This effect is similar to the technique used in Michel Gondry’s video for the Rolling Stone’s cover of Like a Rolling Stone, which I believe was done in ’97 or so: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuGjBNSRi1c

  • http://tequilawhisperer.com Lippy

    I REALLY like the audio track(s).

  • http://www.jeva.hu jeva

    inbetweens done using simple morph. the feel and look comes from the fact that the “artist” did not match the morph areas of the two images correctly. if I would have done sg like this at any of the special effects companies I worked for … they’d fire me. :D

  • http://tangoland.com Cynthia

    Kind of interesting, but I found the soundtrack really distracting. Easily solved by turning the sound down and playing any other music, etc.

  • http://www.frankpanucci.com FP

    Nice enough.

    I did something like this back in the 90s with Elastic Reality, looked at it once, and shuffled it off to a backup disc somewhere. I defined point-to-point morph areas so the effect was cleaner.

  • question

    Isn’t this just morphing between a bunch of photos in AE? just more of them? I don’t know if I’d call this “art” or “directed” but more an exercise in a trade school aftereffects 101 class.

    looks pretty though, neato stuff :)

    • James

      i think this video is less about the tools than the feeling it creates.
      people don’t talk about van gough’s paint brushes!


    The jumpy morphs remind me of Michel Gondry’s video for Joga-but there’s no way they could make morphs like this in AE 3.1 is there?

  • David Breneman

    I also found the soundtrack annoying. Adding, intentionally, the obnoxious sounds you hear on a home video into a soundtrack is certainly a novel artistic statement. As for the video, well, it’s not something you see every day (unless you’re on acid).