Max Fleischer predicts the Future!

Popeye authority Fred Grandinetti found this clipping in The Miami News (published on December 25th, 1936) in which Max Fleischer predicts a day when audiences will flock to theatres to see 3-dimensional cartoon feature films! Of course, Uncle Max was thinking more along the lines of his Stereo-Optical process, using three-dimensional sets and not computer graphics. Nor motion capture (despite his invention of the rotoscope). Still, Max was a visionary…


  • http://www.readingjuice.co.uk/ MM

    If they did make a 3D Betty Boop film now they’d have the perfect model in the form of pop star Katy Perry, would certainly be more interesting in seeing her rendered in 3D in a Betty Boop flick than ‘The Smurfs’.

  • http://reghartt.ca/cineforum/ Reg Hartt

    “Fleischer’s ‘Betty Boop’ character which he created years ago when he was a rising artist…”

    Duh.

    As most of us know Max was well established when Grim Natwick doodled up Betty Boop.

    The first time I was interviewed, in 1968, the result in print was a real shocker. I thought, “Gee, if they can’t get a small thing like this right how can I trust them on the big things.”

    What was true then is true now.

    • eeteed

      oops, sorry Reg. didn’t mean to step on your comment. yours must have showed up while i was typing mine.

  • http://www.lavallelee.com Lavalle Lee

    Many artists and creators are ahead of their time.

    It’s probably what makes their work so great!

  • eeteed

    “…Fleischer’s ‘Betty Boop’ character, which he created years ago while struggling as a rising artist…”

    yow. talk about revisionist history. poor Grim Natwick, and Fleischer was far from struggling by the time B.B. came along.

  • Emil

    Yet Max could not predict he’d be eating cat food in a few short years.

  • GW

    While I wouldn’t care to use it or suggest that anybody else does, it is possible to rotoscope in virtual 3D. With different cameras to capture all the needed angles, it’s definitely possible. If you used something like SANDDE, the 3D drawing device, it could be done.

  • DB

    Too bad he did not predict an earlier release date for Ms. Bug Goes to Town.

  • paolo

    In this article of December 25th 1936 Max Fleischer foresaw also the possibility of a cartoon feature. “Snow White” had its premiere on December 22nd 1937. Did Max Fleischer know that the Disney studio had a feature in preparation at that time?

    • Peter H

      Walt first announced his intention of making an animated feature in June of 1934, in an article in The New York Times. Following this news the Fleischers decided to match Disney and make their own feature, but they were stymied because the Paramount executives were not prepared to back an animated feature at that time.

      • James Ciambor

        Actually your wrong Fleischer intended to make a feature before he heard news of Disney. He was initially intending to make loose adaptation of Gulliver Travels with Popeye as early as 1933. So he had ambitious plans for the one-eyed sailor. Also Disney’s original intent was less ambitious in 1933 that same year prior to deciding on Snow White he was thinking of doing a live-action/animated version of

      • James Ciambor

        Actually your wrong Fleischer intended to make a feature before he heard news of Disney. He was initially intending to make loose adaptation of Gulliver Travels with Popeye as early as 1933. So he had ambitious plans for the one-eyed sailor. Also Disney’s original intent was less ambitious in 1933 that same year prior to deciding on Snow White he was thinking of doing a live-action/animated version of Alice In Wonderland, however Paramounts version released that same year made them throw away the project.

        Also speaking of historical inaccuracies The Fleischer’s were quite a large operation before the rise of Betty Boop, look at the studio personnel photos from the early thirties is a testament to this. Even Grim Natwick was quite affluent prior to Betty Boop he joined IFS in 1917 he was making a hundred a week. He probably used that money for his studies in Vienna in 1920, which proved to be invaluable for Snow White. So are these truly poor starving artists?

        Jerry are you surprised about how much misinformation the Fleischer’s suffer from?

      • paolo

        thanks for all the information. They are really interesting