Who Needs Cartoons When You’ve Got David Duchovny

Cartoon Network

It’s that time of the month again to bring some attention to Cartoon Network’s repudiation of cartoons in favor of transforming itself into a second-rate knockoff of Disney Channel and Nick. Yesterday’s Hollywood Reporter offered details on the network’s latest live-action project: a pilot deal with actor David Duchovny. According to the article, the show “centers on a junior high school student from a long line of newsmen who turns his school AV Club into a hard-hitting citywide broadcast.” For the project, Duchovny is teamed up with producers of live-action kids shows that had aired on Disney Channel and Nick like Even Stevens and The Secret Life of Alex Mack.

Additionally, throughout the month of October, Cartoon Network will be airing nightly reruns of the live-action series Goosebumps. An original live-action made-for-TV movie of their animated series Ben 10 will debut in November. And last week, CN debuted the live-action/animated series Out of Jimmy’s Head, a spinoff to their live-action film Re-Animated.

Earlier coverage of live-action on Cartoon Network:
Our first post in April 2006
The New Cartoon Network
More About Cartoon Network
Most Ironic Exec Quote of the Week
More About The New Live-Action CN
Cartoon Network’s Re-Animated
Another Live-Action Show On Cartoon Network

Read more TV

  • http://www.hobbit1978.deviantart.com Mr. James

    This is just plain sad news. I was really hoping that cartoon network would wake up and read the name on their network and start airing cartoons again. Alas, I was mistaken and I’m very disappointed.

    I saw this coming when they started airing more live-action comedy shows on adultswim but thought that was just a trendy trial period of insanity and not where they were moving towards as an entire network! Again I was wrong. That’s it, I’m starting my own network called the Quality Entertainment Channel and then air nothing but reality TV shows! That’ll show ‘em!

  • http://musingsofachick.blogspot.com sudiegirl

    It does indeed honk me off that Cartoon Network is abandoning its original format. It used to be that CN was home to many good cartoons (past and present). On Boomerang, they don’t even show the post 1948 Looney Tunes anymore, and they rarely show the earlier WB cartoons either. It’s ridiculous.

    What was Ted Turner thinkin’?

  • http://rockitpack.blogspot.com :: smo ::

    cartoon network is the new music television.

    that’s what the kids want right good format changing to total crap? it OBVIOUSLY is a great idea…

  • Fred Sparrman

    Hosting Platform ’08 would help forgive a lot…

  • http://portapuppets.does.it uncle wayne

    and what the **** is wrong with a (or, rather, “the”) Cartoon Network showing nothing but cartoons! It’s like SciFi showing reruns of “Queen for a Day,” or some sports channel showing reruns of “December Bride!” It seems to me there are a century’s worth (literally) of animation to show. Jeeeeeeeeeez!! Where’s the probb, Guys?

    Give me Boomerang, pa-leeeez! (Don’t tell me they are “going under,” too!?

  • Stephen

    The weird thing is, I get Cartoon Network here in Australia and it has no live action at all (except for bits of Adult Swim shows eg. Space Ghost, but that doesn’t really count).

    I have seen (I think) the Banana Splits on Boomerang once, but that’s the only live action I have noticed ever *knocks on wood*.

  • alan

    Proving once again beyond a shadow of a doubt: mainstream Hollywood hates cartoonists more than a thousand Osama Bin Ladens.

    They’ll scoop up any lame idea by a has-been actor or talentless stand-up-comedian or a washed ex-castmember of SNL or some C-list hiphop “artist” than go anywhere near something that was actually created by someone who has worked their whole lives in the cartoon business.

    The only hope for real cartoons is independent internet stuff – but that will only survive if it can win advertising dollars.

  • http://www.shamoozal.com Frank

    i find it hilarious that they’re doing a live action movie of one of their animated shows. what the hell is up with that?

  • uffler mustek

    ummm… did you say “successful?”

  • Billy Bon

    Guys just give it up. CN is just another example of cable “diversifying”, going past it’s original mission of providing something for the fringe/niche and going towards the mainstream. HBO thankfully still does some unique things as does PBS but on the whole, Cable is getting more generic to gain more money. I watch Foster’s on CN but it’s time to give up the ghost. I think we should follow John K.’s lead and really start to figure out how to manage the internet as a new way to get qualitiy creativity going.

  • http://www.dvdenlinea.com Arturo

    here in México, Boomerang airs soap operas like “Rebelde” and things like that…

    Rest in peace

  • Warren

    Animation was used to virtually build TBN (old Tom and Jerry reruns), FOX (The Warner Bros animation output from 1990-1994), The WB Network (KidsWB remained their sole profit generator for the first several years) and now the CN. As regimes of programmers come and go, they tend to want to move beyond what put their networks on the map. Animation traditionally makes a good initial programming because it can usually be acquired more cheaply than live action sitcoms. No residuals to talent, other than voice people, for one thing. It’s sad but it’s also business. The business person is king in America.

  • Arlo

    more like: What is Michael Ouweleen thinking…

  • http://doubleben.blogspot.com/ Emmett Goodman

    Is Ted Turner behind this?! Whose behind these decisions?!?

    Cartoon Network, to me, was one of the last television channels to find great animated shows (they still show FOSTERS, CAMP LAZLO, COURAGE, and such). How could they do this? Its called “Cartoon Network” for a reason.

    Maybe its a cycle that will continue. Another Cartoon channel will emerge, and for ten years or so, it will be great, until its decided that it needs more live-action in order to be more successful.

  • Andre

    I give up on them. There is no real Cartoon Network anymore. Isn’t there anyone with enough moola who would start a network showing all animation, past and present? From all over the world? Theatrical as well as the best tv cartoons money can find?

  • http://stran.issimo.tv/ Papercraft

    That’s a bad thing…to be sincere disney channel is terrible with that situation commedy with kids. I liked a lot CN with only cartoons on that, i can’t belive that now they will create new situation kids comedy..nooo….The business of disney channel and nikoledeon is attaking also CN. Also here in Italy, are borning new comedies similar to disney channel’s american ..with kids acting.

  • Kevin Wollenweber

    When business takes over, there is nothing but greed–it’s a cliche, but a truth nonetheless. Cartoon Network’s credo used to be something like “for the full and complete restoration of classic cartoons…” Hence, perhaps Jerry Beck should own it. He puts in more hours doing just that, or pleading for just that from unimaginative studio heads turning a deaf ear just because they can!!

    Uncle Wayne saw this with clear eyes and ears–it is like any nitch channel that seems to work with the general public showing something other than what the network title represents. People will one day change channels wondering what happened to Cartoon Network when, in actuality, it is there, and they are actually tuning in at times when the live action sludge is taking over!

  • http://chrisbattleillustration.blogspot.com/ Chris Battle

    *SIGH*

  • http://www.travisgentry.com Travis Gentry

    They’ve taken their queue from MTV (you know ‘Music’ Television) and taken out that element that their network is supposed to be all about. Frankly I don’t think Cartoon Network ever lived up to it’s potential. Once it became the network for cheap, ironic, cooler than thou cartoons I stopped watching.

  • http://kitschensyngk.deviantart.com/ Kitschensyngk

    I think another new logo is in order. (PG-13)

  • http://www.thexbridge.com Someone with a pointless viewpoint

    Ted Turner’s been gone from TimeWarner since ’03, so don’t blame him. After all, he has gone on record as saying that behind CNN, Cartoon Network was his greatest creation.

    For the record, Cartoon Network showing live-action is the equivalent of Toys R Us selling groceries. People should be up in arms, but sadly, they don’t give a damn.

    When you hire executives that want to transform Cartoon Network from an all-audience all-animation outlet into Network, Time Warner’s kids station, you already lose, and when they hired Kids’ WB’s Jamie Kellner to run Turner Broadcasting, that was the beginning of the end. Now, they want to compete with the likes of Nickelodeon and Disney Channel by programming their network like them, but here’s the kicker.

    Fans of Nick and Disney aren’t watching Network because THEY’RE WATCHING NICK AND DISNEY. It’s moronic, and they’ve already crossed the threshold of no-return. Cartoon Network is dead.

    The only way they could save themselves is to start over. But Jeffrey Bewkes, the guy who engineered the whole “turn Cartoon Network into a kids network” mandate by hiring Jamie Kellner in the first place, is now Time Warner’s President and COO and, in a few years, will be running the company when Dick Parsons steps down to run for Mayor of New York City.

    I’d start over.

  • Nelson

    Honestly, Cartoon Network has sucked for the past ten years..Since this channel decided to dump the classic cartoons for modern day crappy animation and hearing that CN is going to take the Nick/Disney Channel with live action programs, doesn’t come as a surprise to me and only tells you on how worse CN has gotten over the last two years.

    Any enjoy Boomerang while you can, as it’s only going worse on that channel, as you’ll see more CN orignals popping up than the classics.

  • http://www.drawingboard.org/blogs/Macthorn/ Mac Thornton

    It should be called out of Jimmy’s @$$, I knew they were going to make that drek into a series. When they first aired the movie with all the fanfare and advertisement, then re-aired it a few months later acting like they were doing us a favor (for those who missed the first airing, which I assume would be everyone.)

    I watched the second airing with my kids and my stomach hurt. It wasn’t funy at all, stupid dialog and the one guy (the villian) seemed like he was doing a bad immitation of John Cleese. Maybe if you look all sweaty and say things really loud it’ll be funny… wrong.

    I guess eventually I’ll stop watching CN just like I stopped watching MTV a long time ago.

  • http://zekeyspaceylizard.blogspot.com Zekey

    Well we still have the Nicktoons Network. Although that channel is alot more difficult to get.

  • Corey

    i don’t see why people are upset or suprised. CN is a business, and they will show what they need to to make money. Who gives a shit? That’s what DVD’s are for.

    Seriously, stop watching TV altogether.

  • http://www.davemackey.com Dave Mackey

    I haven’t watched Successful Network in maybe four or five years now. Last thing I probably saw over there was a June Bugs, or that Norm McCabe retrospective on Toon Heads. I don’t have Boomerang, and the only place I ever see classic cartoons on TV is on Animania for one hour a day. Maybe the times are changing, and I’m in no hurry for Successful Network to go back to what they did to get them to where they are (e.g. SHOW CARTOONS). Now they’re like Nick and Disney angling for those freshly minted tween dollars. Bleh.

  • Chris Sobieniak

    >Animation was used to virtually build TBN (old Tom and Jerry reruns),

    You mean WTBS (I know it’s TBS but I like to stick that “W” back in for nostalgia sake)? TBN of course is for Trinity Broadcasting Network, and has little to do with animation unless they don’t happen to play “SuperBook” or an episode of Osamu Tezuka’s “In The Beginning”.

    And yeah, it’s funny people still think Ted Turner’s still there, as if his spirit hovers over the Turner Broadcasting centers like a hawk. I wouldn’t mind hearing one day he died without notice personally. :-)

    > Seriously, stop watching TV altogether.

    Really, that’s what I did, and I turned out OK for the past few years (hardly anything interest me anymore as I think it’s out of league)!

  • Matt Sullivan

    I may just stop watching Cartoon Network altogether. Their Adult Swim shows were bad enough, with their herky-flash quality animation and shoddy art styles, but then Saved By the Bell and this absolute abomination called SAUL OF THE MOLE MEN (don’t you dare defend it just because you have a fondness for Sid & Marty Kroft) came along, and I died a LOT inside.

    We want CARTOONS. It’s called CARTOON NETWORK. Not, “We couldn’t get real producing jobs, so we’re using our position at CN to further our own goals of making REAL television-network.”

  • http://pediatristsplayground.blogspot.com Kevin W. Martinez a.k.a. Leviathan

    CN’s current incompetence at pretty much everything (marketing in particular) is going to their biggest downfall. The thing to understand is that the biggest in-house marketing hit CN has ever had in its entire history was; The Powerpuff Girls. A Cartoon.
    And even the PPG had a fraction of the longevity of Nick’s various cartoon powerhouses over the years; Ren and Stimpy, Rugrats, Blues Clues, Spongebob, Dora the Explorer, not to mention their live action hits.

    Disney Channel’s in-house hits are nothing to sneeze at either; Hannah Montana. High School Musical. Little Einsteins. Mickey Mouse Clubhouse (Disney actually produced a classic cartoon revival that was loved by kids and was successful).

    Say what you will about Nick and Disney’s shows (even though they are mostly of a high caliber); those networks at least know how to generate interest in those shows and turn them into big success. What’s the best CN can do?? Billboards proclaiming “I pooted”?

  • agoti_kappa

    What if FLIP or Animation Magazene had their own TV Channel?

  • DG

    Is it that you guys are confused, or just love to complain? On this site you say that there aren’t enough cartoons on TV. Between CN and Adult Swim, they air more cartoons than any other network (leaving Boomerang out of this for now). They air edgy, different, sometimes groundbreaking cartoons but you guys say you don’t watch. Of course CN is going to live action…because they’re a kids network and that’s what kids watch. By not watching, and therefore not supporting, cartoons on TV, you guys become part of the reason why networks like CN are turning to live-action.

  • http://www.cartoonsteve.com Steve

    As a caricature artist, I get to talk to a lot of kids and like to ask them who their favorite cartoon is. As you’d imagine, SpongeBob has ranked #1 with Tom and Jerry a close second. Years ago it was Bugs Bunny and Taz.

    …but sadly now I hear the answer: “Thats so Raven”. What?? I said CARTOON, you little… After getting that answer one too many times, I decided to sit through an entire episode (oh the pain). I’ve never seen a more moronic, sex obsessed piece of @#x! The story dealt a little boy all stressed out over his first kiss. Good Lord, let kids be kids already!

    Continuing this “kids + sex = profit” logic, CBS is now breaking the law, making kids work in a reality show without adults.

  • http://chrisbattleillustration.blogspot.com/ Chris Battle

    >i don’t see why people are upset or suprised. CN is a business, and they will show what they need to to make money. Who gives a shit?

    Corey, I think it’s ’cause alot of people here work in the animation biz, and less cartoons on the air means less jobs for many of us.

  • http://geritopiablogspot.com GeeVee

    Cable channels are rarely run by visionaries. This is all about whatever is expedient to make the cash; justify the job; retire early with a CEO retirement purse. These guys look over their shoulder for what they perceive as viable trends in the cable business, in lieu of initiating truly ground-breaking ideas. That’s it. Knowing this is so is part of growing up.

  • http://www.thexbridge.com Some Wisenheimer

    Ugh, don’t know what happened in that last post. Let me retry it:

    – Is it that you guys are confused, or just love to complain? –

    Confused? Nah. Love to complain? Some of us, but not all. We complain because we care.

    – On this site you say that there aren’t enough cartoons on TV. Between CN and Adult Swim, they air more cartoons than any other network (leaving Boomerang out of this for now). –

    There’s also Nicktoons Network, who has a yearly independent animation festival. Checkerboard only airs 17 hours of programming Mondays – Saturdays and 16 hours on Sundays. The remaining hours are dedicated to Adult Swim. And yes, out of the 118 hours of CN, eight to ten hours are dedicated to live-action programming, a little over eight percent of the total time. Compared to less than a half percent five years ago. The number is only growing.

    That’s bad.

    – They air edgy, different, sometimes groundbreaking cartoons but you guys say you don’t watch. –

    Never considered a childish monkey talking with his butt groundbreaking or edgy. Nor a detective comprised of nothing more than a butt. Nor the usual “kids in school” cartoons that are the mainstay of the network.

    Edgy is overrated. How about some GOOD cartoons?
    – Of course CN is going to live action…because they’re a kids network and that’s what kids watch. –

    Nope, I’m sorry, but that’s incorrect, but thanks for playing. What’s your parting gift? An explanation of sorts:

    Until mid-2002, when the Kellner era really got jumpstarted, Cartoon Network was considered an animation channel. Yes, children were the majority of viewers of the network. However, 1/3 of the total audience was and continues to be adults. And of that, 1/2 of adults are watching cartoons because THEY like them.

    Mike Lazzo said it best in an interview on another site that I refuse to plug when asked if CN is aimed toward kids or adults:

    — Well, I think both. From the earliest ratings we got, we saw what we in fact see today – which is 2/3 of the audience are 2-11, and 1/3 of the audience is 13 and older. When you examine the older aspect of the audience, it’s pretty clear that half of it is adults watching with their children, and half of it is just adults watching because they love animation.

    So it was kind of a combination of all different demographics, and the older ones were very often watching out of nostalgia. Now I would not say that’s true of a Powerpuff Girls or a Samurai Jack, or obviously the Space Ghost/Birdman/Aqua Teen that we have now, but in the early days that was true. —

    – By not watching, and therefore not supporting, cartoons on TV, you guys become part of the reason why networks like CN are turning to live-action. –

    It’s not because of US. Network doesn’t give a damn about what WE think because we, those who are 14 and over, are not who Network is trying to reach. We aren’t represented at all in ratings reports because we don’t matter. We’re not the reason why Network is abandoning animation. Their insistance of trying to be a carbon copy of Nick and Disney is why they’re shifting in the live-action direction.

    Network wants a Hannah Montana-like hit. We want Hanna-Barbera.

    Network wants a Drake and Josh or a Naked Brothers Band type of show on the lineup. We want Tom and Jerry and Warner Brothers on the air.

    If Network looked closely, they’d see that Nick’s biggest hits aren’t their live-action properties, but rather shows like Avatar and Spongebob Squarepants, centered around great action and silly slapstick comedy Cartoon Network used to be famous for. They’ve forgotten how great they could be. We haven’t.

    THAT’S why we complain.

  • http://mwbworld.livejournal.com/ mwb

    I don’t want them to show more cartoons, I want them to show more cartoons that I actually like. I wouldn’t begrudge them some live action one bit, if they wouldn’t keep replacing shows I like with more stuff that I don’t. But I’m wacky that way.

    With the Dini & Timm stuff gone and Juniper Lee gone, its really just Foster’s for their original programming that I even care about.

    And frankly they overwork the cheap Hanna-Barbera stuff, when there are a whole lot more cartoons series out there over the years they could show too.

    But heck, if I were to have my dithers, what I really want is an Animation Channel. Where you could show all kinds of animation from around the world and the live action would be about animation history and interviews with animators. (Hey I can dream…)

  • http://ryuuseipro.deviantart.com John Paul Cassidy

    I’ve already given up on Cartoon Network (except for THE VENTURE BROS. on Adult Swim). Their good shows are gone now for god knows what reason, and they’ve turned up a lot of mediocre crap. They cancelled JUSTICE LEAGUE, TEEN TITANS, etc., for CAMP LAZLO, MY GYM PARTNER IS A MONKEY and SQUIRREL BOY!? Is that the best they can do? Their current live-action programming goes without saying.

    The only cartoon channels I watch anymore are Boomerang (frequently), Discovery Kids (for GROSSOLOGY, my current favorite new cartoon), and Nicktoons. I also watch certain shows on Nick and Disney, but even they can have better programming than CN.

    Another reason for me to worry about CN: They’re rumored to be airing KAMEN RIDER DRAGON KNIGHT, a bastardization, er, Americanization of MASKED RIDER RYUUKI. If that’s not sacrilegious, I don’t known what is.

  • Keith Bryant

    They might as well. Cartoon Network hasn’t been worth a squat in quite some time. I just wish my cable company would break down and carry Boomerang.

  • Jorge Garrido

    Here’s my solution: split Cartoon Network into THREE channels.

    1. The CN

    A youth-oriented network featuring popular children’s shows like Ben 10, Fosters, and My Gym Partner’s a Mnkey, with live-action as well. A competitor to Disney Channel and Nickelodeon. We could decide the backronym later.

    2. Toonami

    Action-adventure animation, anime, animation music videos, extreme sports, video game reviews the most cutting edge action cartoons of all time, geared towards teens and young adults. (This has been LOOOONG overdue) Sort of like a more specific and solely animation programming oriented Spike TV or G4. (The video games reviews are during commercials like they’ve always been on Toonami.

    3. Cartoon Network

    A cross between the OLD good Cartoon Network and Boomerang. Classic cartoons from the Warner, HB and Turner library, and some CN nostalgia classics for the people who like them.

    Toonami could have the old Adult Swim Action (adult anime) and The CN could have the current adult swim comedy shows. Cartoon Network could hvae late night black & white, toonheads, and the Popeye show (all the old animation history programs I used to stay up late for and get up early for to watch in the old days of CN that they showed briefly on Adult Swim)

    Noggin recently did this. HM Magazine did this recently, too.

  • Jorge Garrido

    By the way, what Jeff Harris is saying above is absolutely correct, in the old days CN was NOT a kid’s network. Just look at all those old promos where they made fun of their own characters, those were aimed squarely at boomers.

    I also forgot to mention that the inspiration for doing a hypothetical splitting of CN into three channels came form Jeff Harris and CNX. He’s been doing these great animation related hypotheticals for years, and he was the first to call for Toonami to hvae its won channel.

    I wish Adult swim had never been created. When it was announced people were extremely excited for it, but I wasn’t. I knew that the people who had grown up with Toonami would abandon it for even more uncut anime, since they were getting older. I proposed simply changing Toonami so that it skewed older (as it always had, even though Toonami had great ratings with the 18-49 demo, Kellner didn’t want that demo) and therefore showing the same programming as it used to along with uncut anime, but keeping the Toonami brand, crew and packaging.

    Which packaging was better, William Street’s fantastical Toonami, or William Street’s minimalistic Adult Swim?

  • http://www.sportingnews.com/blog/mjf7583 Michael F.

    I saw that Re-Animated movie a while back. And I thought Talladega Nights was the worst film of 2006….

    All the programs on CN are just copies of each other (or in the case of Adult Swim shows that target the same stereotypical frat-house college male). aka Animation made a smart move by ending the run of Ed Edd n Eddy before the Turner influence could smack the show head on.

  • http://www.shadowness.com/Novid Novid

    …This was coming. Reason? The industry is bankrupt. There living on borrowed time and money. And that time is running out my friends. If you didnt know, Superman TAS, Batman TAS, Pinky and the Brain, and a 4Kids series name Chaotic is airing at Jetix, starting in October. Why? Because CN and WBA are at war for over silly reasons, but the major reason is what one poster stated up above, animation works for a limited time before the money dries up. You have to work to find ways to make money over the long term and the new owners have not found a way.

    Now lets make one thing clear MTV isnt revelent to this dissusion, but Disney is, because they want to copy Disney success in live action…when HSM2 becomes the event to end all events, people take notice. The only way CN feels they can stay revelvent to the Kids is to air live action product because Disney has got a system of making writing semi-sexual product that goes over the heads of familes. Does that mean what Disney is doing is right? I dont know and frankly it doesnt matter to me…

    The thing i see, is that they (Warner Brothers, Nick, Disney)are doing a fire sale of all the product from 1997 to 2006 to the digital channels because thats the only way any such money can be made. There isnt any such broadcast syndcication anymore, so such networks as NickToons Network, Jetix on Toon Disney and Boomerang is were the industry can make money on older products.

    They dont want to take a risk any more (see the Danny Phantom/Invader Zim/Samurai Jack issues) with new animated product, and they want return on investment. If you compaired how much money the Power Rangers have made back ever since Disney bought it back in 2001, then you can see why TV Animation is a losing cause monetary wise.

    Then there is the anime issue, Which it could fill a whole book, but in simple terms, teenage male bloodlust, busty ladies (in the modern days its the younger the better) and symbolism that goes over the heads of most westerners= The Hotness. Cant compeate with that, no matter how good John K is. It doesnt even help matters when he calls the masses trologdtes…and the John Bradshaw Layford’s of the world hire’s the worst VA’s in the world and calls his product the NEW Disney Empire…that isnt Disney or friendly.

  • http://willfinn.blogspot.com/ Will Finn

    i recently read a great book calld NO LOGO by Naomi Klein. It’s about how corporations have learned that once a brand has been established, the core product that the brand stands for should be entirely shucked (or at least severely marginalized) so that the company can sell just the brand itself as anything from bottled water to designer clothing to resort-style real estate. Apparently an actual product is too narrow and too risky to be saddled with (especially when it can be outsourced) so that the only thing the company really wants to be in business for is liscencing the ethereal “meaning” of the brand (at premium prices) to whatever will sell. This ran thru my head last week when i saw the posting about Walt Disney-”inspired” living room furniture (which looked liked sterile, overpriced junk to me) and earlier depressing stories about fruits and vegetables bearing CINDERELLA 3 labels. And as many have pointed out already, the M in MTV ceased to stand primarily for Music a long time ago.

    if you don’t think this “brands over products” mentality is the gold standard in the crack pipe of corporate thinking, take a look around. “CN” is just another brick in the wall.

  • http://zeteos.blogspot.com/ mick

    the internet is the future for certain. Tv mostly sucks a pigs bad parts… too many commercials… bland product… money money money is the route. get there the quickest with the most dollars and stepping on the most people. Pretty much all the above posts are right. Vive la revolution

  • Arlo

    “They dont want to take a risk any more with new animated product, and they want return on investment.”

    What?!?
    Let me impart this absolute about business: NO RISK, NO RETURN.
    Your statement is so off base and so cowardly, that you could easily find a high level position at Cartoon Network.

    “If you compared how much money the Power Rangers have made back ever since Disney bought it back in 2001″

    I wish it were funnier that you cited one of the most extreme gambles in childrens television that paid off as an example of a safe bet. Its not funny though, its just a misguided statement more of us in here have to correct.

  • Quiet_Desperation

    >>> Seriously, stop watching TV altogether.

    You need to understand the mindset. It’s the typical “I don’t like it, it is beneath me, gosh I am so elite. Oh, and anyone who does like it is a troglodyte/frat boy/retarded/whatever.”

    *shrug*

    Personally, I’m looking forward to new Metalocalypse episodes, and I *totally* hope Killface wins the presidential election on Frisky Dingo.

  • http://www.shadowness.com/Novid Novid

    “What?!?
    Let me impart this absolute about business: NO RISK, NO RETURN.
    Your statement is so off base and so cowardly, that you could easily find a high level position at Cartoon Network.”

    First of all, if there was any risk taking over in CN, Korath would air on AS right now as an example. When Disney first did the High School Musical series, it was very low risk and it payed huge dividends. Advitar over at Nick was a high risk series, and so far the Executives at Nick wants a live action movie to cement Advitar’s place and prove to themselfs it was worth the investment.

    “I wish it were funnier that you cited one of the most extreme gambles in childrens television that paid off as an example of a safe bet. Its not funny though, its just a misguided statement more of us in here have to correct.”

    No, i put it there because im not talking about the Saban/Fox Kids days of the series, im talking about how much Disney has made since they bought the series from News Corp, and such series as Witch, American Dragon Jake Long, and such other shows didnt make that much more to cover the investment. A much better example of what im pointing out is Dragon Ball Z and Naruto as of right now and how much they made back for Funi and Viz. Not that huge of a risk, and both companies have raked in the dough for the last several years now.

  • http://musingsofachick.blogspot.com sudiegirl

    I agree about the three-channel concept noted by Jorge…now if the powers that be can take care of business.

    I need some Bugs Bunny, dammit!

  • http://www.cartoonsteve.com Steve

    >>> Seriously, stop watching TV altogether.

    I bet a lot more people will do just that, in two years when the FCC switches broadcast to digital, necessitating an adapter for old fashion televisions to work. There will be much more interesting viewing on the internet by then. … actually there is now.

  • gogopedro

    Man This would be funny if it wasn’t so heartwrenchingly painful to watch.

    Its harsh because Now Boomerang is pretty much Cartoon Network, and Cartoon Network is just as you said. The new “NETWORK”. It all reminds me too much of Disney Channel and the birth of Toon Disney.
    Or Nickelodeon and NickToons.

    Man I need to stop watching the Tube.

  • Corey

    I work in the biz myself as an animator, and I don’t watch TV. I just watch the cartoons I want on DVD. I get my news and etc. online.

    TV is a tired old thing. It would suck for sure if people lost their jobs because CN or Nickelodeon went away, but there are jobs out there other than TV.

    I stand firm on my statement. STOP WATCHING TV.

  • Chris Sobieniak

    > I bet a lot more people will do just that, in two years when the FCC switches broadcast to digital, necessitating an adapter for old fashion televisions to work. There will be much more interesting viewing on the internet by then. … actually there is now.

    More of a case of mass confusion by those who hadn’t been aware of it. What I’ll miss from the switchover is the portability of TV, as most sets being sold at the moment tend to be stationary and the need for a portable HD set you can take on the go hasn’t became possible yet (like in camping). Shame they ruined what took mere decades to accomplish.

  • Mr. Semaj

    Cartoon Network is wrong anyway for trying to compete with Nickelodeon or The Disney Channel. Disney already has the strangehold on the coveted pre-teen (or “tween”) audience. Nickelodeon lost nearly all of the versatility it once had, even among its long-standing kid audience, and only has ONE Nicktoon keeping the network alive.

    All of what has been said so far has led to two causes:

    1) Why I don’t watch much television, outside a couple favorites, and sometimes the news and a game show. I spend more time online anyway, so leaving the TV off more often just saves time and energy. Every channel we ever loved is turning their backs on us and isolating themselves from their own consumers.

    2) Why so many people in the past year and a half have been posting archived ads, interstitials, and programs on websites like YouTube. People still love these shows, and, if they can’t get them on television, they’re sure as hell begging for some DVD releases. When companies like Viacom threaten suits and make YouTube erase videos, members, and clubs dedicated to classic television, that’s Corporate America not getting with the program.

  • http://www.omanaman.com omanaman

    I agree with Corey… Stop watching TV. Unlike 10-15 years ago, there are plenty of other avenues to get animation.

  • http://www.thexbridge.com A Guy With An Opinion

    “The industry is bankrupt. There living on borrowed time and money.”

    The animation industry is NOT bankrupt by any means. The only thing handicapping it are the lack of true variety on the air and inane executives who are so hellbent of homogenizing television so viewers won’t know what they’re watching anymore. There are still a wealth of creators out there still churning out quality creations and, believe it or not, there are some executives that have displayed something that’s rarely seen . . . sense. John Lassetter and Fred Seibert should be more than the exception to the rule.

    “If you didnt know, Superman TAS, Batman TAS, Pinky and the Brain, and a 4Kids series name Chaotic is airing at Jetix, starting in October. Why? Because CN and WBA are at war for over silly reasons, but the major reason is what one poster stated up above, animation works for a limited time before the money dries up. You have to work to find ways to make money over the long term and the new owners have not found a way.”

    Um, you did know that Cartoon Network aired both Superman and Batman several years ago and recently completed a run on Boomerang, right? It’s a been there/done that scenario for CN. Also, both shows as well as Pinky and the Brain are availiable on DVD, on the in2tv broadband network, AND coming to a new animated broadband channel from Warner Bros. Now, if it was a couple of years ago when Toon Disney announced that acquisition, I might have batted an eyebrow, but it’s 2007, and it’s already been done.

    “Now lets make one thing clear MTV isnt revelent to this dissusion”

    Yes, MTV IS relevant to this discussion. You see, MTV Networks owns Nickelodeon, and Nickelodeon had been the pinnacle of children’s entertainment for the last 25 years. Disney, taking a cue from its teenybopper Radio Disney format, transformed a once-great channel into the equivalent of a “TV Disney” capitalizing on the tween/teenage girl market.

    Nickelodeon, who had off and on attempted to market themselves to teens, found a formula with their TeeNick lineup as well as continuing to keep the younger set watching. They’ve managed to create a brand that “grows” with its viewers and are expanding themselves with the creation of The N, a new stand-alone network coming at the end of the year.

    Network has failed to realize that you need the network to grow with the audience in their push to become a kids’ channel. Remember that whole demographic that I posted saying that 1/3 of CN’s total audience are adults and half of those are watching it because THEY like cartoons? Well, on the flipside of that, the other half are parents and grandparents watching with their kids, and if they (the parents and grandparents) don’t like what they see, guess what? They won’t watch either, thus causing the channel to lose more of the younger viewers they crave like crack.

    “The only way CN feels they can stay revelvent to the Kids is to air live action product because Disney has got a system of making writing semi-sexual product that goes over the heads of familes.”

    But kids are WATCHING Disney. Kids are WATCHING Nick. If you have to choose between a Disney/Nick-like live-action program on Cartoon Network or an actual Disney or Nickelodeon live-action program, they’re going to watch the real deal, not a second-rate knockoff. Kids aren’t stupid. They know when someone’s being fake, and that’s what kids see when they see Cartoon Network trying to be Disney or Nick. And guess what? They’re not watching!

    “Does that mean what Disney is doing is right? I dont know and frankly it doesnt matter to me”

    It should matter.

    “They dont want to take a risk any more with new animated product, and they want return on investment.”

    They make new animated products every year. Every new show is a risk. Sometimes they play it safe by developing shows based on familiar properties, but the risk is how viewers will react to this interpretation of a familar character.

    People initially had low expectations for Batman: The Animated Series because they felt animation would dilute what Burton’s Batman films brought to the character. So, it was a risk. Cue to the 21st century. When WBA launched The Batman, there was low expectations for that series because, well, Batman: TAS had set the bar for quality so high. It had been a mixed bag, but The Batman did find its flow and stood head to head with the 15-year old classic.

    “If you compaired how much money the Power Rangers have made back ever since Disney bought it back in 2001, then you can see why TV Animation is a losing cause monetary wise.”

    Power Rangers was already a money-making franchise prior to Disney’s purchase of the property. However, the property is NOWHERE near as big as it was in the Fox Kids era, though it does bring in a much-needed boost in boys’ retail sales for the company.

    “Then there is the anime issue, Which it could fill a whole book, but in simple terms, teenage male bloodlust, busty ladies (in the modern days its the younger the better) and symbolism that goes over the heads of most westerners.”

    Way to stereotype a whole industry there. That’s just as bad as people stereotyping American animation as nothing more than school-aged kids in wacky adventures with talking animals and idiotic adult role models aimed towards the lowest common denominator. As you can see around the net and highlighted at places like The Brew, that’s not the case. So, don’t go stereotyping Japanese animation.

  • Arlo

    “there are some executives that have displayed something that’s rarely seen . . . sense. John Lassetter and Fred Seibert should be more than the exception to the rule.”

    Fred Seibert’s spin machine must surely be working overtime if people are duped into believing he is anything close to the maverick and genius that John Lasseter is. just a note: one of those two men is responsible for laying off an ENTIRE studio of animators.(hint: its not Lasseter)

    “You see, MTV Networks owns Nickelodeon,”

    MTV does not own Nickelodeon. MTV is owned by their parent company Viacom. As is Nickelodeon. there isn’t one MTV executive who has any power over anything broadcast on Nickelodeon.

    “But kids are WATCHING Disney. Kids are WATCHING Nick. If you have to choose between a Disney/Nick-like live-action program on Cartoon Network or an actual Disney or Nickelodeon live-action program, they’re going to watch the real deal, not a second-rate knockoff.”

    on this point you could not be more on point. true success stories have always charted their own path and nearly all dismal failures have followed in the footsteps of successes trying to cash in on their creativity. what i notice most about Cartoon Network is that the powers that be almost always follow in the footsteps of other creative formulas and the product they put on the air is a diluted, rehashed shadow of something viewers have already seen before.
    thats just a perfect recipe for failure all around.

  • http://www.thexbridge.com A Guy With An Opinion

    “Fred Seibert’s spin machine must surely be working overtime if people are duped into believing he is anything close to the maverick and genius that John Lasseter is.”

    No, I haven’t completely swallowed the Kool-Aid, but I do know he was one of the people responsible for the metamorphsis of Nickelodeon from “The Young People’s Station” to “The First Kids’ Network,” the creation of Nick at Nite, led to the (brief) resurrection of Hanna-Barbera, which led to the development of many of the characters that used to be the marquee characters of Cartoon Network, and helped engineer the current generation of Nicktoons. Mr. Seibert also brought MTV Networks into the digital era before launching his own internet channels in recent years.

    No, he’s not quite the animation ambassador as Mr. Lasseter is, but Mr. Seibert isn’t a slouch.

    “just a note: one of those two men is responsible for laying off an ENTIRE studio of animators.(hint: its not Lasseter)”

    Circle 7 Animation is still in business then? Thought that studio got the boot after Disney bought PIXAR.

    “MTV does not own Nickelodeon. MTV is owned by their parent company Viacom. As is Nickelodeon. there isn’t one MTV executive who has any power over anything broadcast on Nickelodeon.”

    No, MTV doesn’t own Nickelodeon. MTV Networks, a division of Viacom, owns and operates the network as well as VH1, Spike, Comedy Central, and CMT, as well as their spinoffs, digital channels, and multimedia units (i.e. TurboNick, Neopets, MTV Overdrive, and Comedy Central Motherload). More specifically, Nickelodeon and the Nick family of networks are a part of the Kids and Family division of MTV Networks.

  • compn

    “It had been a mixed bag, but The Batman did find its flow and stood head to head with the 15-year old classic.”

    you got any facts to back up The Batman going toe to toe with BTAS?

  • jane

    Well it appears that all of you who were worried about this can cheer up. Word is that Cartoon Network is NOT picking up the pilot for “Stan the Man” (that was the title, after its main character).

    Yes, I realize that this comment can’t be taken as anything other than rumor until verified by a more legit source, but I thought it might help some of you to breathe a sigh of relief in the meantime.

  • jane

    To clarify, the pilot was produced; CN, in the end, decided to NOT pick the show up as a series.