Howard Post (1926-2010)

Mark Evanier has reported the passing of Howard Post. Mark does a great job discussing Post’s prolific career in comics. I, too, was a huge fan of Howard Post’s work, not only in comics, but also of his brief stint as successor to Seymour Kneitel at the Paramount Animation Studio in 1964-1966. I got to interview him several times about that period (photo above is of me and Howard, at right, at the San Diego Comic Con in 2003).

Among the comic books Post drew, his work on Harvey’s Spooky and Hot Stuff in the 1950s and 60s is his most significant, and influential.

But Post did some unique little things during his brief time as the head of Paramount’s animation studio in the 1960s that are worthy of note. I like the Ronald Searle-esque The Itch, his adaptations of Jack Mendelsohn’s child p.o.v. comic strip Jacky’s Wacky World, and his ill-fated attempt to bring Bill Dana’s Jose Jimenez to the screen. He was required to fulfill a pre-existing order of Seymour Kneitel/Eddie Lawrence Swifty and Shorty series. With nothing to lose, in the last S&S cartoon, Post decided to do without Lawrence’s voice, painted the characters all in white and set them against impressionist background paintings. The end result, Les Boys (1965), is quite a treat – and a worthy tribute to a man who was always creative no matter the constraints.


  • Roberto Severino

    My condolences to Howard Post and his family. I loved his comic book work a lot and even some of his work at Paramount. It almost seems like all the cartoon greats from the Golden Age are passing away more than ever, especially this year. A lot of people are probably still grieving over the recent passing of Allen Swift and Frank Frazetta, so it’s very unsettling to hear this happened too.

  • http://bakertoons.blogspot.com/ Charles Brubaker

    Aww, and just when I began discovering the sixties Paramount shorts.

    S’long, Mr. Post. And I would never have that Honey Halfwitch theme infest my head without you.

    Some samples of his syndicated strip, “The Dropouts”
    http://www.comicstripfan.com/newspaper/d/dropouts.htm

  • Chris Sobieniak

    Being reminded of having see these Paramount shorts nearly 20 years ago and wonder about this particular director and what else he did in his time.

  • http://www.TVsKyle.net TV’s Kyle

    I grew up on his Star Comics work. The world has lost an amazing cartoonist.

  • Alfons Moline

    These are really sad news. Post was one of the very last veterans of the Golden Age of animation still alive. I first was acquainted with him through his ‘Dropouts’ strip (which was reprinted in an Italian comic magazine) before discovering his work in Harvey Comics and in the animation field. He did never receive the cult status that Avery, Jones or Barks did receive, but after all, he was a honest and prolific artist, who left a huge quantity of works that will remain with us forever.

  • Bill Field

    The Drop Outs were also animated on Archie’s TV Funnies, so, not only did he create comics FROM film, but also had his comics jump to film, themselves.

  • http://robcatview.blogspot.com robcat2075

    I’ve never seen a Swifty and Shorty before but he seems to have invented Lost, a sideways universe where characters go about their activities, unaware that they are ghosts.

    I knew nothing of Mr. Post, but that just shows how little I know.

  • http://willfinn.blogspot.com/ Will Finn

    RIP. I was a fan. Loved THE DROP OUTS comic, which ran in our Sunday paper. A very versatile trooper and a prolific, talented man.

  • Rooniman

    OHH!! My heart aches! I didn’t even know He was still alive, but now I’m heart-broken to hear the great Howard Post is dead. This is turning out to be a very sad year.