Help Fund the “Most Beautiful Erotic Animation Film Ever Made” (NSFW)

Copenhagen-based Naked Love Film specializes in hand drawn erotic animation, and after producing two short films in the same amount of years—Little Vulvah & Her Clitoral Awareness and NAKED LOVE-Ea’s Garden—they have turned to Kickstarter to help fund their most ambitious project to date: a hand-drawn film that will be between 25-45 minutes in length. The movie, titled We Got Lost on the Other Side of Wilderness, is the sensual brainchild of the studio’s founders, animator Sara Koppel and composer Sune Kølster, who describe it like this:

“The film is an erotic epic love story, a modern fairy-tale in a burlesque near-future parallel world, where humanity is living under the constant threat of an inevitable natural catastrophe, but still is continuing their destructive ways, trying to escape their destiny with mindless consumerism. And all over the place, nature is trying to get through the clean and cultivated appearance of human culture including, of course, on the erotic field…”

Koppel and Kølster have an assortment of unique incentives for interested backers including original artwork from the film, DVD collections of their work, and Koppel’s painted works, which come in the form of her Moving Women paintings and Flora Vagina plates. They are also offering an opportunity for backers to appear in the film in an “erotic situation,” a perfect holiday gift to give to a loved one (or your boss). Uniquely, some of the ‘upfront’ goals, like downloads of their short films, will be made available to backers regardless of whether or not they meet their goal.

The filmakers are seeking $75,000 to produce the 18,000 to 32,400 drawings required to complete this film by 2015, and have currently raised nearly $9,000 (or 11% of the goal). You can learn more about the minds behind Naked Love Film in the update section of the Kickstarter page where they are documenting their progress with a 24-days of Christmas video calendar.


  • Lili

    Nothing can beat Belladonna of Sadness http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cdp85x9d0A4

  • Vivi

    [Comment removed by editors. Per our commenting guidelines, “Defamatory, rude, or unnecessarily antagonistic comments will be deleted.”]

  • IJK

    This is going to be a tough sale for them… People who crave erotic stories tend not to gravitate towards animation because some of them feel weird being turned on “by a cartoon character” (Whereas live-action = real and writing = allows your imagination to flow). There’s a whole market for hentai but that really goes more into the fetish category than something like this, which seems to be approaching it more in an “erotic novel” standpoint.

    They’ve already got a really small target and unfortunately, I don’t think they’ll find it on CartoonBrew. They’re going to really have to go out of their way to seek out their audience to make their goal in time. Good luck to them!

    • Barrett

      I hope they succeed, but yeah, I know what you mean about “feeling weird about being turned on by a cartoon character.” That “erotic fan tribute” to the “Modifyers” pilot on Newgrounds definitely qualified as a bit of cognitive dissonance for me. I think if it’s more like artful drawings and less like a Saturday morning cartoon, it’s not as jarring, at least for me. There were several great old Playboy cartoonists who did one-page gag illustrations that were both funny and arousing without being “weird.”

    • Marbles471

      I swear, as long as I live, I will never GET that. The whole “feeling weird about being turned on by a cartoon character” thing, I mean. For god’s sake, if people didn’t get turned on by drawings, there would be no history of erotic art, and art history itself would be almost unrecognizable.

      • A Guy

        But weren’t most of those based on real models and painted realistically at a time when photographs didn’t even exist? It’s not really comparable to non-realistic animations of characters that don’t exist at all.

  • Kolport

    They just had to make everyone to look like animu characters and this would be backed in 1 hour.

    • Barrett

      Ain’t that the truth….

      I keep waiting for the anime “fad” to die out, but 15 years in, it looks like it’s gonna stay entrenched here stateside. Personally, I don’t get it. Unless it’s Studio Ghibli or a few specific anime I’ve seen such as Cowboy Bebop, most of it just isn’t all that engaging or appealing to me. The redundant character designs are particularly tiresome for someone who relishes strong, individual character designs that look like they come for a specific artist.

      • AMERICAN ANIMATION ONLY

        Wow, I didn’t know that the animation that has been made in Japan since the 50′s was a ‘fad.’

        • Funkybat

          I wouldn’t call anime a fad, that would be kind of like calling Disney feature-quality animation in the 90s a “fad.” Still, I know that from an American animation fan’s perspective, the “Asian invasion” of the 90s and early 2000s seemed to overwhelm domestic animation in the hearts and minds of a lot animation watchers.

          In the early 90s, there was something of a renaissance both in feature animation and TV animation, and TV animation in particular had a lot to offer teens and adults who had little to watch in the dark days of the 70s and 80s. The Fox Kids, Kids WB, Cartoon Network and Nick lineups all had multiple shows that had broad appeal across age groups and genders.

          Around the late 90s, what had previously been something of a niche as “Japanimation” suddenly seemed to be everywhere. Pokemon, Ghost In The Shell, and The Matrix (and Animatrix) seemed to push this into a full-scale revolution. Anime seemed to proliferate in both kid-oriented and adult-oriented animation. Kids cartoons continued stateside, but domestic animation aimed at teens and twentysomethings seemed to be limited to a few MTV series and crude webtoons.

          Things are more balanced now, but the aftereffects of this Anime surge seem to be more permanent than it at first appeared.

      • Marbles471

        Japan’s comic and animation culture does tend to have a pervasive “house style” the same way American animation did in the 1930s and ’40s. The thing is, within that house style, there is a lot more variation than you think. The trick is that you need to look for it in the right places. And theme-wise, much of what gets exported here tends to be poppy, light, teen-oriented stuff, or very dark, nihilistic teen-oriented stuff. (Some of which is very good, by the way, but too much pop or too much angst is never a good thing.) The best of what Japan has to offer has to be sought out and cherry-picked, not gathered en masse.

      • Johnny

        “The redundant character designs are particularly tiresome for someone who relishes strong, individual character designs that look like they come for a specific artist.”

        Which you sure as hell aren’t getting from animation produced in the US either. You and the people who up vote these types of posts have no idea what you’re talking about. You all really do animation as a medium a great disservice.

      • cruising

        that is why its called anime – a genre that has specifics, as to which how it would generally look like. I would rather go for designs that have individual styles than just wearing different colored spandex anytime.

  • Tori Rhodes

    I’m intrigued, but I’m not sure how I feel about the art style.

    Regardless, I wish I had more disposable income, because being able to tell people I was in an animated sex film would be kind of amazing.