Random Cartoons start today!

Starting today, the Nicktoons Network presents Frederator Studios’ Random! Cartoons each Saturday and Sunday at 10:30am Pacific time /1:30pm Eastern time. This week, Saturday (12/6) Episode 101 (Doug TenNapel’s Solomon Fix, Kyle Carrozza’s MooBeard, Nikki Yang’s Two Witch Sisters) and on Sunday (12/7), Episode 102 (Jeff DeGrandis’ Finster and Finster, Pen Ward’s Adventure Time, and Anne Walker’s Mind the Kitty).

I’ve been informed that my Random cartoon, Hornswiggle, may be delayed from its originally scheduled December 20th slot and is being held for a “possible stunt” next Spring. As usual, I’ll keep you posted. You’ll know when I know.


  • http://bakertoons.blogspot.com/ Charles Brubaker

    And it only took like what? 2 years?

    Nice that it’s finally airing. Sucks that it’s on Nicktoons Network, though. I only have basic cable.

  • david

    nice that it FINALLY made it to air… too bad I don’t have nicktoons network anymore. maybe it’ll end up on regular nick in between reruns of drake and josh and icarly…

  • http://pfprint.blogspot.com korey dee

    this is so exciting!

  • http://yeldarb86.deviantart.com Mr. Semaj

    “I’ve been informed that my Random cartoon, Hornswiggle, may be delayed from its originally scheduled December 20th slot and is being held for a “possible stunt” next Spring.”

    They know how to torment their audience. :(

  • http://checkeredgeek.blogspot.com Zach C

    It’ll be on regular Nickelodeon at some point too, right?
    …I sure hope so.
    I was missing Oh Yeah! and What a Cartoon. Glad this type of outlet is being brought back.

  • Luke

    I’m a big, fat, drooling Doug TenNapel fan, and, as excited and happy for him as I am to see one of his projects in production… I can’t help but feel disappointed with the 3D art I’ve seen for this project. It really lacks the life and zaniness of his drawings. And it’s not like TenNapel doesn’t translate well to 3D. He’s just as famous for his stop motion work as he is for 2D animation and Comics. Hopefully this will work out, but… I’m nervous.

  • http://www.slappypictures.com MikeD

    Luke, don’t worry, Soloman Fix is funny, despite the translation of Doug’s drawings to 3D. Doug also has a 2D short in this batch of Random! Cartoons called Squirly Town. Check that one out — you won’t be disappointed.

  • http://qwertypictures.deviantart.com/ Christopher

    Well, that’s one big heap of good news 2008 has brought us. If only this was available on Nicktoons in the UK, it would be perfect 8-)

  • http://www.maketeanotwar.co.uk Aaron Foster

    Funny how Nick have taken so long to air these that airing Adventure Time will pretty much class as an advertisement for their rival channel Cartoon Network who were quick enough to see it was popular online and snapped it up before Nick could be bothered. =P

  • http://frederatorblogs.com/floyd/2008/12/06/have-internet-cartoons-killed-saturday-morning-cartoons/ Floyd Bishop

    I wrote a post about this over on my blog on Frederator. http://frederatorblogs.com/floyd/2008/12/06/have-internet-cartoons-killed-saturday-morning-cartoons/

    I think the way that the Random Cartoons have gone from initial production to their final airing (three years since most of them were done) is a case study in how the internet is killing (or has already killed) television animation.

    Disclaimer: My studio animated the opening logo and a segment of “6 Monsters”.

  • Mr. Semaj

    Floyd,

    You have an interesting view of where the market for animation is headed, only this time, there appears to be more opportunities for experimentation and originality that television scarcely allows.

    That said, we should be focusing on who the Disney or Chuck Jones of Internet animation is going to be, not Hanna-Barbera. As efficient as HB’s production system was at first, their domain became over-focused on meeting an annual quota, instead of making entertaining products, and later devolved into the end of the line for many old school animators.

    We don’t want any of that impossible-to-get-anywhere bureaucracy leaking on the Internet too.

  • David Levy

    Floyd,

    I wouldn’t underestimate the importance of personal relationships into why these shorts had been delayed three years. Herb Scannell, a business partner and ally of Frederator was president of Nick when this deal was struck. Shortly afterwards, Cyma Zarghami became president and that could have changed the network’s agenda. I don’t claim this as fact, but, it’s as good a guess as any.

    If anything, the internet should/will revive these types of shorts programs because it will create an even cheaper, faster, lower risk form of production for networks to test out cartoons. I think the coming years will bear this out.

    As great as these shorts programs are, (and I would LOVE to be a part of one), they don’t really yet represent the way classic animation cartoons were born. In the good ol’ days, directors had years to develop their craft by making short cartoons in studio units that eventually bore fruit as Bugs Bunny and so on…

    As Amid Amidi has said, the smart shorts program of tomorrow will take this into account and pool a bunch of talent together and find a way to let them gel into a unit to produce lots of cartoons.

  • http://www.bishopanimation.com Floyd Bishop

    Mr. Semaj: In my reference to Hanna Barbera, I was talking more about how they found a way to continue to work in animation, even though the market as they had known it for so long had completely changed. I agree that bureaucracy is more of what we don’t need, and I think that the open nature of the internet helps kill much of that off before it starts.

    David Levy: I’m sure there were lots of reasons that the cartoons aired so late. None of this type of thing happens when someone uploads their cartoon to the internet. Put it up, and people can watch it right away.

    Homestar Runner, Happy Tree Friends, and a few other series have really taken off on the internet. They have also evolved in a similar fashion to what the classic cartoons have. Start with something, then see what is funny, what do you enjoy, what does the audience respond to, etc. The cartoons have a style and cast that is quite different than when they started. The last series on television (that I can think of) to go through such a growth process was the Simpsons. Would these types of shows even see the light of day on television in today’s climate? I doubt it.

  • Robert Schaad

    (One of) the things about the internet though…and this has been more eloquently stated before, has been that with music, art, animation, etc….once it hits the internet, bravely anonymous bloggers (bloggees?) rip it to shreds. Would Bugs, etc. have been allowed to grow design-humor-wise in today’s climate??? A question. literally for the ages…
    ;)

  • Inkan1969

    Sailor Bird from “Moobeard”, she’s an ultra babe. :-)