“Frozen” Has An Amazing 5th Weekend, On Pace to Set Disney Records

Moving back up from third to second place, Disney’s Frozen grossed a spectacular $28.8 million (estimated), pushing the film’s domestic total to $248.4M and all but guaranteeing that it will surpass the $300 million mark in the United States. The film also stands a solid chance of beating The Lion King’s $311.5M total to become the highest-grossing Disney film of all time in the US. Frozen exhibited mid-week strength, too, with a powerful Monday-Thursday frame of $27.5M.

These number are anything but normal for a film in its fifth week of wide release. Box Office Mojo offered some context: Frozen’s weekend performance was the third highest-earning 5th weekend of all time, behind only Avatar ($42.8M) and Titanic ($30M). Overseas, Frozen performed solidly with $50.5M for the weekend, lifting its global total to $243.5M. Worldwide, Frozen has racked up $491.9M in ticket sales.

Thanks to the holiday period, Fox’s Walking with Dinosaurs held steady with $7.1 million (est) in its second weekend, which is almost the exact same total from its opening weekend. The underperforming CG pic has scored $20.8M domestically and $33.4M internationally for a worldwide total of $54.2M. Faring better in its second weekend, the Walt Disney biopic Saving Mr. Banks earned $14M (est), which was 50% stronger than its debut weekend. Its domestic total is $37.8M; Banks hasn’t debuted in a substantial number of foreign territories yet.


  • Josh Book

    Congrats to the Disney Frozen team!

  • Terry Biddle

    “…the highest-grossing Disney film of all time in the US.”

    Do you mean Disney “animated” film? Avengers and the Pirates movies grossed much more.

  • hellohi

    Might not be the norm, but last week was winter break for most schools. And it’s a holiday-appropriate family movie about sisters.. numbers make sense.

  • EscoDingo

    Frozen is definitely up there in my all-time favorite movies. I’ve seen it 3 times in theaters already, might see it once more before it leaves. Very solid work, congrats to the team!

  • Mr. James

    I completely agree Barrett. I heard all of the glowing reviews and reports about Frozen being better than Beauty and the Beast and then went to see it the 2nd weekend it was out. I must have went in with too high of hopes based on everyone else’s feedback because I DID NOT think it beats Beauty and the Beast and I agree that I think Tangled and Wreck It Ralph were much better overall movie experiences.
    One of my biggest complaints was the amount of songs that simply were not needed to move the story along. I think the disney team did a stellar job of executing the film itself and visually it was a stunning experience. However, it left a lot to be desired when it came to editing, pacing, and character development.
    Can’t wait to see what they do with their next one because I think this one was a misfire and I’ll be sad to see them continue to slip backwards story/character wise based on ticket sale response.

    • Funkybat

      I am glad I didn’t hear any of that “better than Beauty & The Beast” hype beforehand, because I would have been seriously let down if I had gone into the theater expecting that. Frozen was more or less what I expected, save for some fresh twists on who is a hero, who is a villain, and how some people don’t fit into such easy pegs. There were pleasant surprises and some unpleasant ones. The handling of the musical numbers, especially how they were almost all front-loaded into the first 30 minutes, was rather uncomfortable, and I usually love Disney musicals. I am not really worried about the future of Disney based on any of the criticisms I had with Frozen, because they are things that I don’t think would come up with stories like “Big Hero 6″ or “Zootopia.” I prefer to hope that we will see more “Wreck-It Ralphs” and fewer Broadway-style animated films.

      • Mr. James

        It’s funny you should mention the “Broadway-Style” animation format because that’s exactly what I thought during half the songs in the film. I was picturing how they would be transformed for the stage. I’m not saying they WERE created with musical theatre appeal in mind but it was easy to see how it could be adapted/achieved.
        I think anyone with any skepticism towards mass marketing of creative projects would think along those lines when you watch a big budget picture that has broad appeal. For instance, the same could be said of Cars 2 as a “money grab” for Pixar. (and that was a lot of the complaints about the film here on the Brew) Was it as good as the first Cars? Debatable. Was it HIGHLY marketable for toys/merchandise for small boys? Absolutely!
        I think it’s an interesting and larger debate about how we the viewer enjoy the final film and how we can either “like” or “dislike” a film based on the outcome of our own beliefs in the company backing it. If you compare it to a magic trick it’s almost like saying that 2 magicians can perform the same levitation trick, but which one didn’t let you see the strings because they are better at misdirection?

  • Sebastian Villegas

    Frozen deserves all the glory it gets. Saw it on Saturday with Inside Llewyn Davis and American Hustle. They’re all great.

  • LOLOLOL

    I personally think that Frozen really was one of Disney’s best creations, beating out even some of the classics. It wasn’t QUITE Lion King level but it was, nonetheless, a great movie.
    It felt like it only took 30 minutes, something was ALWAYS happening
    The characters were absolutely to DIE for, Kristoff, Anna, Elsa, and Olaf quickly become attached to you
    Ultimately I left the theater feeling something, like the tale that was just told – while very sad at some points – was very good, I really liked the ending and when a Movie makes me pause to really think about what just happened I KNOW it really was great.

    Overall some of the hype isn’t really necessary, this isn’t better than the Lion King, but it is a fantastic movie and easily the best movie of the past few years