A Hollywood rip-off

hollywoodshirts.jpg

The You Thought We Wouldn’t Notice blog noticed this. An LA-based limited edition “lifestyle brand” company, The Hundreds, is ripping off the character of Holli Would from Ralph Bakshi’s Cool World for part of their upcoming winter collection. (The image above is on their site only on the initial screen if you refresh a few times.)


  • Zach

    It may be one of Bakshi’s lesser works, and it may even have (arguably) stolen a few elements of Roger Rabbit.
    Still, I think this popular Bakshi quote is appropriate: “Sweetheart, I’m the biggest ripped-off cartoonist in the history of the world, and that’s all I’m going to say.”

  • http://www.electricminstrel.com Brett McCoy

    Who was copying whom? I daresay Jessica Rabbit is very Bakshi-ish

  • Patrick

    Well the first design I clicked on for the company was a Walt Disney designed World War 2 insignia for a bomb unit featuring one of the Crows from Dumbo! And there is another shirt with a Disney designed insignia for the USS Hornet.

  • http://noteimperfect.blogspot.com Tor

    Maybe it’s just me, but Holli looks better as a redhead.

  • Baron Lego

    Not to worry- your average person outside the animation industry has absolutely no idea about Cool World. Or probably cares.

  • http://intracerswetrust.blogspot.com Dav-Odd

    They might have made it look a little nicer.

  • http://www.autodaddy.blogspot.com tom

    It’s still a rip off, and Ralph should ruin these people.

  • Tavie
  • Simon

    What’s wrong with this world?! It doesn’t matter if Cool World sucked (it did), or if Holli Would was Jessica-like, who was Red Hot Riding Hood-like, who was Betty Grable-like. Those were all homages at best, imitations at worse. This is a blatant trace. The peanut gallery over at You Thought We Wouldn’t Notice even said that they changed enough (hair color, added tattoos) – - to warrant an original creation. Others said, “who cares? its from 1992.” So it’d be different if it was from 2002? Some even here on the Brew are saying no one outside the animation industry would care. Whether or not that’s true is besides the point. What’s wrong is wrong. The idiocy, ignorance, disregard and disrespect for other people’s work is staggering… and as Patrick pointed out, this company continues to make money swiping the work of true artists. they should be put out of business, but instead everyone just shrugs their shoulders and the complacency continues to rise.

  • Edward James

    Just parasites out to make a buck. If they get too high-profile, they’ll get sued.

  • Dock Miles

    What a sad situation. What would Alfred E. Neuman say?

  • http://segaltoons.com Steve Segal

    Thank you, Simon. I was getting livid reading the blasé posts from both sites about artistic theft. You said it better than I could.

  • http://rockitpack.blogspot.com :: smo ::

    plagiarism is plagiarism.

    my friend just started teaching and he’s recently been faced with having to fail someone for just changing the colors of a preexisting logo and calling it their own.

    tracing something in illustrator and changing the color does not make you a designer.

    b.s.

  • http://trevour.blogspot.com Trevour Meyer

    Exactly what Simon said.

    Just because you may not care about the matter doesn’t mean it’s OK to blatantly rip something off. For shame.

  • Spit & Spite

    So if this happens, what can an artist do to defend themselves once a company (like The Hundreds) does something like this? Is retaining a lawyer the only option?

  • http://www.autodaddy.blogspot.com tom

    “Dock Miles says:What a sad situation. What would Alfred E. Neuman say?”

    I don’t think he’d be worried about it.

  • http://dearartblob.blogspot.com/ Ethan

    “Art theft” makes me laugh. Rather, the actual “act” of it and the people who complain about it make me laugh.

  • http://gagaman.blogspot.com The Gagaman

    Did anyone also notice the T-Shirt design with the Andy panda lookalike on it? There’s also one with Bambi’s mother. Tracing over old cartoons seems to be a hobby of theirs =)

    The slogan of this brand seems to be “The followers of the old school”.

  • http://kanokid.com kaNO

    I’m sure bakshi ripped it off of someone as well, the guys no angel c’mon.

  • Dock Miles

    Art “thievery” is a lot more slippery business than the standard black-and-white model. Of course outright bootlegs of legitimate artworks (films, albums, performances) are wrong and deplorable. But the borrowing and transforming of images and sounds is way more complicated than the weenie-simplistic –”I can see where he got that — “J’Accuse.”

  • http://zeteos.blogspot.com/ mick

    go Ethan… you must be laughing quite a bit over this. It’s ticking all the boxes

  • http://sandwichbag.blogspot.com Elliot Cowan

    ““Art theftâ€? makes me laugh. Rather, the actual “actâ€? of it and the people who complain about it make me laugh.”

    Why is this?

  • http://dearartblob.blogspot.com Ethan

    “Why is this?”

    Better question: Why should I care about “art theft”?

    I feel that as soon as you create something for your audience, it is not yours anymore, it is theirs. I apply this viewpoint to anything creative and certainly apply it to my own work (if and when it ever gets better, hahaha). I find it humorous that people would actually be up in arms over something they put in the public (!!!!!) view and not expect anything to happen to it.

    What? Did you get into art to draw for yourself or to draw for the money? Hahahaha, surely you jest? Then keep it to yourself. You were given these skills, talents, gifts, blessings or whatever not for your own entertainment, but for the enjoyment of your audience (which truly gives you pride when someone other than yourself enjoys your work). And really, you shouldn’t expect anything more than a “thank you” or “nice work” or a “you inspire me”. Seriously, this is all that you need. You want money? I suggest you look in the Classifieds and find a real job.

    It is as simple as this folks; don’t want people “stealing” your work? Then don’t ever, ever share it with anyone. I’m very chill about the whole deal. Eventually, if people want to take my work and put it on tee shirts and make a profit, then I’m not going to stop them! Why should I?

  • http://sandwichbag.blogspot.com Elliot Cowan

    If I thought you were just trying to stir up trouble then I’d actually have some admiration for you.
    As I’m detecting no irony in your response I’d have to say that your thoughts on the subject are naive, immature and completely uninformed.
    A quick glance at the work you’ve presented online would suggest that despite your strong opinions, having your work plagiarized is something that you probably won’t have to worry about anyway.

  • Feet in Mouth

    What the stone-throwers behind this website never bothered to realize was that the back of the shirt offers a very obvious homage to Cool World. Since The Hundreds have a shop on Rosewood Ave. it reads “Rose Would If She Could�. The tagline for that movie was “Holli Would If She Could.� Hollywood being the play there. Since The Hundreds is set on Rosewood in Hollywood, ah now it all comes together.

    This is a very common basis for pop art and appropriation, parody. I would understand if they had just used Holli and that was it. But look before you step next time folks

    Guilty until proven innocent, much?

  • http://sandwichbag.blogspot.com Elliot Cowan

    Who’s to say that it was intended as parody, which, by the way is missing the point completely.

  • http://dearartblob.blogspot.com Ethan

    “As I’m detecting no irony in your response I’d have to say that your thoughts on the subject are naive, immature and completely uninformed.”

    Oh, really? Care to further explain in sordid detail why you feel that way about my viewpoint? I feel that I wrote it out in a passionate and understandable way. Maybe you take the whole “art theft” thing way too seriously, which I have to say is very unfortunate.

    “A quick glance at the work you’ve presented online would suggest that despite your strong opinions, having your work plagiarized is something that you probably won’t have to worry about anyway.”

    Now, but what about later? I plan on working very hard to obtain a professional quality to my work, no matter how long it takes. When that times comes, when this whole art thing clicks for me, I still won’t care if someone “plagiarizes” my work.

    My work is for the people and I do not expect anything in return nor do I care what they do with it. I’m truly sorry that you don’t feel the same way.

  • http://sandwichbag.blogspot.com Elliot Cowan

    Your attitude shows a complete lack of respect for both your own work and the work of other people. You trivialize and devalue everything that real creators stand for. As for taking art theft seriously – of course I do. Theft is the operative word here.

    Imagine this: A lazy person decides that they will steal from me because they cannot be bothered creating themselves.
    Then using the images they have stolen they generate income.

    Aside from the fact that I draw for the passion and love of it, I also use my talents to pay my bills and now there’s someone taking money out of my pocket. I am a little astonished that I even have to explain this very simple concept to you. It is very true that one day you may be a great producer of wonderful images, I agree. But I can’t imagine the whole “art thing” clicking with you when you have this attitude. I used the words “naive, immature and completely uninformed” because it seems to me you have no fathomable concept of what it’s like to be a working artist.

  • http://dearartblob.blogspot.com Ethan

    “Your attitude shows a complete lack of respect for both your own work and the work of other people. You trivialize and devalue everything that real creators stand for. As for taking art theft seriously – of course I do. Theft is the operative word here.”

    I respect my work enough to practice it, study it and learn it. I respect other’s work for it inspires me to strive to that level. I, however, don’t feel a need to throw a hissy fit when somebody right-click/saves a digital copy of my or someone else’s work. That’s ridiculous and time wasting. As I wrote before, don’t show people your work if you really care about “art theft”.

    Theft implies that someone breaks into your home and steals your possessions. That’s theft. Someone is physically taking (by force) something from you against your will. Downloading digital copies (in most cases very crappy versions) from the web doesn’t constitute as theft. You willingly post it to the web and make it easily accessible to people. Nobody is putting a gun to your head and forcing you to give up your work. So chill out.

    I had someone break into my car a couple years ago to steal my cd player (they didn’t succeed). Did I piss or moan about theft? No. It was a hundred dollar player that could be replaced with something, get this, better (I ended up punching and breaking said player months later). Same thing with art or really anything. You can replace it with something waaaaaaaaaaay better.

    “Imagine this: A lazy person decides that they will steal from me because they cannot be bothered creating themselves.
    Then using the images they have stolen they generate income.”

    Apparently they did something right. They had a better business plan than you and they knew how to sell your work. That’s not lazy at all. That’s actually pretty smart. I don’t see the problem. Your work is getting out there and being viewed by more people than before. If you’re a renowned artist, then everybody will know you drew it (isn’t it enough to be known and loved? What more do you want?). If you’re a nobody; tough luck.

    If this is all about money, then wow, you are a very selfish and greedy person. It’s all about you, right? It’s not about giving something to your fans, your public, your audience for little to no cost to them, is it?

    “Aside from the fact that I draw for the passion and love of it, I also use my talents to pay my bills and now there’s someone taking money out of my pocket. I am a little astonished that I even have to explain this very simple concept to you. It is very true that one day you may be a great producer of wonderful images, I agree. But I can’t imagine the whole “art thingâ€? clicking with you when you have this attitude. I used the words “naive, immature and completely uninformedâ€? because it seems to me you have no fathomable concept of what it’s like to be a working artist.”

    Well, there’s your problem right there; solely depending on your talents to survive. Ever heard of getting a blue or white collar job? More than enough money to survive and hey, it has job security and great benefits like health care! I don’t think a “career” in art can provide that most of that.

    My attitude won’t stop me from getting somewhere. In fact, my attitude has a better chance of helping me succeed than anything, because I’m not in it for the money, I’m in it to give my work to my audience. They are the driving force behind my goals. Screw the money. It is not important and it should never be a reason to get into art.

    Ha, a working artist. And that is why I think the way I do. I understand the concept, but it’s not for me. I don’t want to be a working artist. I would never want a job in art. That would cheapen whatever talent I had. I hate work. I think it is a load of crap. I do my job (which is so far removed from art) because it gives me the money to work on my creative projects and study on my own time. My job doesn’t drain me artistically because I’m not using my talent or skill 40+ hours a week.

    If I had a job in art, I would end up hating art. Drawing for 40+ hours a week is not enjoyable to me, especially doing the crap a company would have me do rather than doing my own personal stuff that I would want to share with others. And I don’t want to hate art, I love it. Simple as that.