Walter Lantz Christmas Cards #2

Tis the season… to post another batch of 60s era in-house Walter Lantz Productions studio Christmas Cards – from the grateful staff to their beloved bosses, Walter and Gracie Lantz. We posted several of these from 1964-1971 back in May, courtesy of animation art collector Martin Almeyra. Martin was kind enough to provide a few more (click thumbnails below to enlarge) from 1965, 1967 and 1968. Look close and you can see the signatures of Lantz mainstays Paul Smith, Cal Howard, Les Kline, Sid Marcus, Al Coe and others. Click the image above for the card from 1963, when Art Davis was there between gigs at Warner Bros. and DePatie-Freleng.


  • http://www.fluffyandmervin.com Debbie

    While the Walter Lantz “cartunes” may not be as popular as the stuff that was produced by Warner Bros. and MGM, these drawings show that the Lantz artists drew in a very appealing style, especially the 1965,’67 and ’68 cards. It’s good to see that someone remembers these characters. It’s a shame that The Woody Woodpecker Classic Cartoon Collection DVDs stopped after just two volumes.

  • Oren

    The collection stopped while the shorts were still good.

  • http://ramapithblog.blogspot.com David Gerstein

    Even I can’t name many of the bit players on the 1963 card. And I thought I knew obscurity.

  • http://www.davemackey.com Dave Mackey

    I saw a lot of names not publicly connected with Lantz in screen credits but were associated with him for years. Lowell Elliott had been a writer for Lantz in the 40′s and is on all the cards, right up to 1968. I wonder what his function was in those later years. Bill Garity, Al Glenn, and Jack Eckes worked in various technical capacities. I think Garity was sound and Eckes was in camera….

    • http://bakertoons.blogspot.com/ Charles Brubaker

      Garity is credited for Production Supervision in the “Woody Woodpecker Show” program. I’m guessing he was in the management in later years.

  • Ron Scheibel

    I interview Lowell Elliott in 1982. He designed the first Woody Woodpecker – the wacky one with the thin beck. He was a writer and illustrator.