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‘Avatar’ and ‘Korra’ Co-Creator Bryan Konietzko Weaves New Graphic Novel ‘Threadworlds’

"Threadworlds." Click to enlarge. (Image: FirstSecond Books)
“Threadworlds.” Click to enlarge. (Image: FirstSecond Books)

Hurry up and wait, benders! Bryan Konietzko’s debut graphic novel series Threadworlds, acquired by Macmillan imprint First Second, arrives in 2017.

Like Konietzko’s Peabody-winning animated series Avatar: The Last Airbdender, and its feminist sequel The Legend of Korra, co-created with Michael Dante DiMartino, Threadworlds explores what happens when the natural universe meets technological progress — or regress, depending on the planet. Threadworlds has five of them sharing a single orbit, each in its own stage of technological development, all of them Earth-like analogues “teeming with life,” according to First Second’s announcement this morning.

But those with questions about whether or not Threadworlds will soon be adapted into an animated series should probably slow their roll.

"Threadworlds." Click to enlarge. (Image: FirstSecond Books)
“Threadworlds.” Click to enlarge. (Image: FirstSecond Books)

“I have dreamed of doing a graphic novel project since art school,” said Konietzko in a written statement. “My career took a different path for the last seventeen years, but I am finally getting around to it! Co-creating and producing Avatar and Korra was an incredible experience, but as an artist and writer I have longed to find a more intimate connection with the making of my work. The artists on our animation productions were so incredibly talented and inspiring that I got the itch to strike out on my own and test my mettle in this neighboring medium.”

Like The Legend of Korra, Threadworlds is also led by a powerful female protagonist, the aptly named Nova, who is not an elemental superhero but instead a young scientist from a primitive planet whose fading empire is unable to let go of its oppressive traditions, one of which forbids women to read and write. Nova’s scientific discoveries set unequivocal changes in motion across Threadworlds’s interconnected planets, promising a more philosophical comics entry in a marketplace still mostly, dumbly bound by patriarchal superheroes.

“Once I came up with the idea for Threadworlds and spent some time thinking about its main character, Nova, it became less of a choice and more of something I simply had to do,” explained Konieztko. “The things Nova wants to learn, I want to learn. I am compelled to go on this journey with her and explore these worlds together.”

"Threadworlds." Click to enlarge. (Image: FirstSecond Books)
“Threadworlds.” Click to enlarge. (Image: FirstSecond Books)

“I definitely wasn’t aiming to be topical, but once science became the focal point of the story I knew it was important to me to have a young girl as the main character,” Konietzko added in an Entertainment Weekly interview about Threadworlds. “This is basically Nova’s long origin story as scientific superhero. I hope she’ll be inspiring to readers of all genders and ages, but especially girls who are interested in studying and pursuing science.

Konietzko counts himself lucky to have found a home for Threadworlds at First Second Books, a youth imprint home to intriguing work from comics outliers like Paul Pope (Battling Boy), Richard Sala (Cat Burglar Black), and Jillian and Mariko Tamaki (This One Summer). Its “awe-inspiring stable of creators” and editor Mark Siegel helped seal the deal for Konietzko, who says he now has “a lot of writing and drawing to do.”

“The seven seasons of Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra have delivered some of the most beloved and inspired storytelling of our time,” Siegel said. “With Threadworlds, Bryan further spreads his wings as an author and an artist, taking us to startling new worlds and creatures at once alien and brimming with familiar humanity. It’s daring, it’s deep, and like Avatar, it’s that rarest thing these days: a thrilling adventure that isn’t in the least cynical. And gasp-out-loud wondrous artwork to top it all off. I love what Bryan Konietzko does.”

  • Mike

    Is it really necessary to describe Korra as Avatar’s “feminist sequel?” It’s a sequel, starring a woman. But part of the hallmark of Mike and Bryan’s series is that they are interesting stories that happen to have well-developed characters– Korra didn’t try to push some feminist agenda, and if it was resonant in that regard it was because those characters struck a chord. If anything I’d say that Avatar was more feminist than Korra; it had stronger and better-developed characters (male and female!) and purposefully addressed issues of social inequality and discrimination. Korra’s first and second seasons, in contrast, featured both female protagonists dueling for the affections of a dumb aloof dude…

    • Exactly what I thought too!

    • morphizm
      • RockXLight

        They didn’t say anything specifically about feminism, just that they thought it was important to have more females in leading roles. Mike is right — it’s no more a “feminist” show than Avatar was.

    • LoK more feminist?

      Good point on that, just having a female main character doesn’t make your work feminist. And did we forget that Avatar had two episodes with pretty forced feminist messages?
      Also its main character didn’t have their ass handed to them every episode. Korra had way too many crying scenes for my taste and spent the first season being involved in a cheating relationship without showing a semblance of guilt. I never felt she had anything to feel strongly about, unlike Aang, she felt more like a tool.

      • Aang cried more than Korra, and Zuko cried more than both of them.

        • Ravlic

          I really don’t feel like he did. Even if he did, he’s a kid. Korra would break way too easily.

          • John

            You try being the new Avatar after Aang reunited all the nations and ushered in an era of relative peace after 100 years of war! Some pretty big shoes to fill if you think about it that way, especially adding in the ways in which she’s treated by the public.

          • Ravlic

            You can’t convince me that Korra had to deal with worse things than Aang. Aang was expected to fight and even kill an evil emperor despite being raised in an environment discouraging violence and run and live in hiding all while learning 3 elements in a ridiculously short span of time. Oh an his entire race was exterminated. All before he even hit puberty.
            But what’s that compared to Korra, an apparently strong aggressive woman who would break after she didn’t manage to beat up the bad guy the first time? Frankly, it made her feel weak.

    • enochrox

      Strong developed characters? Nobody changed at all the entire series except Ang & Zuko. Everyone else pretty much stayed the exact same person top to bottom….

      • Sokka grew up and learned to respect bending and learned to be selfless. He went from a stupid little kid to a father figure.

        Katara learned about revenge and learned to live with her mother’s death and the existence of the fire nation.

        Toph learned to metal bend, but she didn’t change much other than that throughout the course of both series’

  • Paul M

    We all know this is going to be an animated series, so can we just get on with it please?

  • Társio Abranches

    Interesting! But these first images resemble too much an animation.

    A comic needs a looser style, more intimate.

    • enochrox

      Its almost as if youve never read any Euro titles… or missed all 7 “FLIGHT” comic anthologies? Or haven’t been to a comic shop in the last decade?

      • John

        Calm yourself, fellow comics fan

    • That’s what makes a comic infinite. Hard lines and blocky shapes are not welcoming or inviting.

  • Redwood

    I know that many people might not agree with me, but having a protagonist that is female or a member of a racial or any other minority will never automatically make a work good. Especially if it is presented as a major selling point.

    Just look at tLoK for example. When people talk about this show you can be almost sure that someone will praise the ending and talk about it, even though the segment took around 20 seconds out of more than 40 episodes. Almost any article about Korra will mention the ending, the progressiveness, the representation, feminism and “strong, POC,
    female, bisexual protagonist” as like nothing else about the show even
    mattered. When people point out the weak points of the series and how it was, in their opinion, inferiour to The Last Airbender and had weak characters, rushed plot and spent so few time developing the characters and the world they just get called homophobic and downvoted into oblivion.

    So why almost all my favourite books, movies and shows have a predominately male, and usually white and straight, cast, even though I’m a girl? Because I care about engaging story, about beautiful art, about meaningful and interesting conflict, not about the physical traits of the characters.

    For the record, I’m not saying that the diversity is bad; I think it’s quite the opposite. I know that here are many wonderful works that have female protagonists. However, when diversity and progressiveness are flaunted like a red rag in front of a bull and people call you a bigot for not liking the work, then it gets bad.

    I apologize for the huge wall of text; I just really needed to get this off my chest.

    • Austin Buell

      I have to agree on that. Despite the theatric animation, the show itself was bland as can be. The first season is basically girls fighting over a man gets them into sticky situations, and the second continues the mediocrity of women fighting over men, every character’s flat like a wooden board. The first two seasons both have villains that easily become evil over no reason other than to try to be like ATLA in fast forward, instead of using the opportunity of a single or two antagonists over the course of the four seasons.  The male characters are just shells of better ones. Bolin is a far dumber Sokka, Mako is a whiny version of Zuko without any background to care about him or his brother. And by the fifth episode, I was sympathizing with the antagonists over the protagonists due to how terrible of characters they really are.

      Having the after effects of a revolution literally not impacting the entire status quo of the series, literally making every season in themselves and utterly pointless to watch as a whole. The last two are just Korra getting beaten and poisoned and then the very first major female antagonist in the franchise since Azula is beaten down and weeded out easily over pathetic reasons. Asami’s a nothing until the last season as I barely recall and apparently in the last half of season 4, treats Korra terribly. They have very little chemistry besides being the token lesbians because the creators said so off screen.

      Korra is basically every filmmaking problem present in the live action version of Avatar: The Last Airbender. Every single ESSENTIAL plot detail and character development for the characters happens off screen, the very thing every single one of those fans complained about in the M.Night Shyamalan film. There are simply too many characters and compresses too much plot in terms of a 12 episode season. If Airbender was done today [the show], then it would have ended Sozin’s Comet at the twelfth episode. Having zero planning for the series before it was even scripted and animated was completely obvious.

      The franchise’s strengths laid in the collaboration process, not the mere fact of the creators themselves.

      Was the show great at spots? Of course, and i won’t deny that the first three episodes of Book 1 and the entirety of Book 3 that was in the Earth Kingdom were among the strongest of the Korra side. However, none of it made up for the rest of the terrible dreck. People acting like the fan service of Book 1 and that 20 seconds of hand holding make a difference shouldn’t be taken seriously.

      Again, relying on Tumblr and Twitter to fill up gaping holes of plot that should ultimately be shown not told, is a major failure in storytelling. And if they couldn’t have the characters be overtly in a serious relationship, why was it written into a corner like that? Then again, to write any relationship, the characters have to actually have to have some decent time on screen together and have chemistry.

      General Hospital does relationships better than Korra.

    • HabariTess

      “I know that many people might not agree with me, but having a protagonist that is female or a member of a racial or any other minority will never automatically make a work good. Especially if it is presented as a major selling point.”

      See, I think you are missing the point. If an upcoming comic, book, or movie is noted for having a main character or characters who are minority it is not to tell people that this work is going to be good. It is to tell people, specifically those who are so hungry for characters who they can relate more to them and those who just want to dive into characters who are unconventional, that there is a story coming out that may be of interest to them.

      For those who are rarely represented, it IS a big deal. Because it is a story that will take their experiences, or their culture, into account. Korra ending up being bisexual IS a big deal, especially for those who don’t fit the straight model, there is finally a character out who is. Many articles discuss this aspect of the show due to how unconventional it is for a children’s show because it was unconventional. Korra has flaws, yes, but to many people, including me, it was still an overall good show. People discussing that fact that Korra is bisexual and how wonderful that is is not them dismissing the shows flaws, it is just them recognizing what the show actually did. Having a canon bisexual character. If someone is downvoted for giving criticism of a show, I can say with confidence it is not due to the fact that the show is progressive, it is just due to a person pissing off another person for dissing their favorite show. There are many people who are very protective of their shows and would be offended to read any criticism of it. The people who do yell out “homophobic” for criticism of the show are probably a very small minority.

      “So why almost all my favourite books, movies and shows have a predominately male, and usually white and straight, cast, even though I’m a girl? Because I care about engaging story, about beautiful art, about meaningful and interesting conflict, not about the physical traits of the characters.”

      Nope, thats not the reason why. The reason why all your favorite books, movies, and shows have primarily white, straight cast is because the people who are in charge of publishing books and comics and producing and financing movies and shows are predominately white and/or male, and/or straight and have very little interest in producing/publishing media that does not follow the same mold. The vast majority of the comics, movies, and shows follow the same mold so it isn’t a surprise that your favorites follow that same mold too. It is not because their aren’t good stories with minority characters out there. It is simply due to the fact that those stories just DO NOT have a chance to get made into something more, unlike the ones who do follow what is typical.

      And it is not just the “physical trait of a character” that matters to people. It is everything that goes along with it. A fantasy based in Africa is going to be very different from one based in Europe or Asia. A story that follows a gay knight in early Europe is going to be different from a story that follows a straight one. A main character who is a minority is a guaranteed that the story will follow the experience of that minority. A lesbian main character will develop feelings for a female, a story about an asian american character will include aspects of their culture, a story about a black child from the inner city thrown into another dimension is going to have aspects of his culture thrown in.

      I’m black and I can say with confidence that the majority of black characters in mostly white shows and movies suck. I can tell that they were simply an afterthought, a last minute effort to make a movie or show more “diverse.” They tend to be one dimensional, follow the “Magical negro” trope, having nothing going on with their characters, and usually be the ones who die first because the writer had no real plans for the character so might as well kill the character off. Asian characters also don’t fare any better, what with many asian males characters are emasculated. I have read many asian americans complaining about how asians are portrayed in american media. Is it any wonder why, when we hear of an upcoming comic or movie with a minority as the main cast, why such a thing is highlighted? So when there is going to be a comic, movie, or show that, for me, a black character is in the lead and isn’t one dimensional, than you bet I’ll be there. Not because I think the story is going to be good because they have minority characters, but because of the higher potential promise of good characters who share with you what vast majority of other characters in the media don’t. For example, I watched the movie After Earth with Will Smith and his son, and god, that move had so many flaws, but you know what I can appreciate with that movie? I like that the movie portrayed a conflicted black teen boy and his complicated relationship with his father. It is not something I see a lot and my family and I found it refreshing. When your white( and I’m assuming you are because you read like one) and straight, you have an endless of choices to pick from.

      • Austin Buell

        So characters can only be related to if you’re of that particular group? That’s absurd. If someone needs to see characters like that in the media without feeling insecure about themselves, it says more about the person complaining than it does of the producers.

        This is exactly Michelle Rodriguez’s point about this manner. If you don’t like how it is, change it yourself, invest in projects that are original characters, stories and situations, or don’t complain at all. Why should the majority bend and compromise creative integrity just to create characters because apparently people apparently can’t relate to characters outside their skin color,gender, social class, or ethnicity?

        Creating token characters whose only worth is that they’re a minority and not creating a cultivating story, is pathetic storytelling at the best and downright terrible writing at its worst. And what about American writers and creators whose personal experience wasn’t based on shallow grounds of diversity and just never grew up in that setting? Great writers and creators write what they know, because that comes from the heart ,and what surrounds them. Why even try if either way, they’ll just hound them for writing a weak character or not doing one because they’d much rather not stereotype them.

        By the way, I’m not sure how Korra as a series is exemplary for anything beyond its animation. Read my above post about what I said prior on that reasoning.

        • HabariTess

          “So characters can only be related to if you’re of that particular group? That’s absurd. If someone needs to see characters like that in the media without feeling insecure about themselves, it says more about the person complaining than it does of the producers.”

          No where did I even say such a thing. Wanting to see someone like yourself in your heroes is not the same as having the inability to relate to characters who are very different from you. One of the characters I most relate to is Hermione Granger, for example. I have no problem relating to her. It is a different kind of relatedness that I’m talking about that it is hard for those who are constantly represented well to understand. You just don’t get it.

          “This is exactly Michelle Rodriguez’s point about this manner. If you don’t like how it is, change it yourself, invest in projects that are original characters, stories and situations, or don’t complain at all. Why should the majority bend and compromise creative integrity just to create characters because apparently people apparently can’t relate to characters outside their skin color,gender, social class, or ethnicity?”

          I do plan to help that change. Hell, one of the reasons I became an artist was to write and illustrate stories that I wish I had as a child. And what do you mean don’t complain. There is nothing wrong with hoping for more change in the industry.

          “Creating token characters whose only worth is that they’re a minority and not creating a cultivating story, is pathetic storytelling at the best and downright terrible writing at its worst.”

          Only thing we agree on. Token characters are usually the worst characters on the show, movie, or comic. For me, I would rather they didn’t insert the “obligatory” black character if they had no direction for that character in the first place. Like I said in my first post, most black characters are one dimensional, lacking any character depth and of course, usually the first ones to die, probably risking his life saving the more important white characters. No thanks.

          “And what about American writers and creators whose personal experience wasn’t based on shallow grounds of diversity and just never grew up in that setting? Great writers and creators write what they know, because that comes from the heart ,and what surrounds them. Why even try if either way, they’ll just hound them for writing a weak character or not doing one because they’d much rather not stereotype them.”

          LOL. Shallow grounds of diversity. There are plenty of stories out there with no diversity. These writers and creators would just be going by what most are doing in the first place. Most movies today aren’t even more diverse, the background characters are diverse, not the main characters. I, for one, am perfectly okay with creators who have no diversity in their stories, especially if they are just going to put a token in there with no plans on developing that character. That, to me, is more of an insult than having none.

          But you went completely off topic. I was not even arguing for stories to have more diversity. I was explaining why articles tend to highlight diversity whenever a new comic/tv show/movie happens to have a minority as the main character and why it is important for those who want more representation

          And we can agree to disagree on Korra.

          • Austin Buell

            “No where did I even say such a thing. Wanting to see someone like yourself in your heroes is not the same as having the inability to relate to characters who are very different from you. One of the characters I most relate to is Hermione Granger, for example. I have no problem relating to her. It is a different kind of relatedness that I’m talking about that it is hard for those who are constantly represented well to understand. You just don’t get it.”

            On the one hand, you’re saying you can see yourself and relate in characters such as Hermione Granger, yet you contradict yourself and state that you need characters to be exactly like you to see yourself as them. You simply can’t have both. It’s either or.

            I like the fact that people are starting to create things surrounding other influences in this country. It’s rather boring to see the entire notion of Europe summed up as Britain or America as New York or LA, and Africa’s just literally Africa. Asia is basically Japan and China and maybe India. Where’s the Polish, Greek, German, Russian or Northern and Southern European side of things in general?

            My favorites did arguably have many white characters, but then that’s how they were created initially. But I had others that weren’t of that mold when I’ve seen anime.

            “I do plan to help that change. Hell, one of the reasons I became an artist was to write and illustrate stories that I wish I had as a child. And what do you mean don’t complain. There is nothing wrong with hoping for more change in the industry.”

            Internet activism is mostly useless or counterproductive to said intents. It’s better to just produce the work and try to get it out there. It’s not a bad thing to worry about, but sometimes I wonder if those same people would put their wallets on the line for that alone.

            “Only thing we agree on. Token characters are usually the worst characters on the show, movie, or comic. For me, I would rather they didn’t insert the “obligatory” black character if they had no direction for that character in the first place. Like I said in my first post, most black characters are one dimensional, lacking any character depth and of course, usually the first ones to die, probably risking his life saving the more important white characters. No thanks.”

            I really don’t know why it really happens. Maybe its for some quota, but it really never makes sense.

            I called it when the Indian guy in Jurassic World was going to die and how virtually every character but the main cast was going to survive. How’s there any tension if that happens? I was hoping the older brother would die and make the deaths far more random than they were in the movie.

            I took huge issue with all those dinosaurs coming out of the Avian Zoo and virtually every single person running away, in the exact same fashion, single file. It’s as CinemaSins termed it. They all went to the Prometheus School of Falling Objects. A huge part of the people could’ve saved themselves if they just went inside those restaurants.

            “LOL. Shallow grounds of diversity. There are plenty of stories out there with no diversity. These writers and creators would just be going by what most are doing in the first place. Most movies today aren’t even more diverse, the background characters are diverse, not the main characters. I, for one, am perfectly okay with creators who have no diversity in their stories, especially if they are just going to put a token in there with no plans on developing that character. That, to me, is more of an insult than having none.”

            It’s basic conundrum. Either fill the background with minorities, recast a white lead as a minority, or have just the background characters. I still don’t know why Hollywood has never offered to just straight adapt FullMetal Alchemist and Attack On Titan, either as cable TV shows or films. Both have largely European casts, a few minorities that may or may not be major roles, and are down the alley. Just offer the creators a sweet deal they can’t refuse and it’d work.

            Not like Hollywood could mess up such material more than Japan can.

            But I’d like to see how Static Shock is going to turn out because of the show was on while I was in middle school. It would be interesting if Marvel or Fox get around to making an X-Men film around the X-Academy comics or the Runaways. Those were my favorite runs and then I left.

            And we can certainly agree to disagree on Korra.

        • RK

          Hmm I actually agree that Avatar is better in terms of overall storytelling, but I like Korra more because of all the things it did for me – yes, I’m a girl and I’m bi. And I wasn’t planning on commenting until I saw your reply. I just felt like I really want to speak up.

          No, characters don’t have to be in a group that we belong to for the audience to relate to, but it does affect our own self perception. I don’t know much about your upbringing, but having grown up watching so many films that feature males as action heroes, and girls as princesses and damsels in distress, it actually made me grow up hating girls. It isn’t an outright hate, but more like an internalised hate for our own identities. Me and a lot of my friends grow up feeling like, to be “cool”, you can’t be “girly” – aka the weak, useless girls who only sits around and wait for their Prince Charmings. We have to be like a guy to be cool, and to be liked. (Unless your life goal is to be the romantic pursuits of guys.) To act like a princess would end up with guys dissing us and telling us to go back to our own spaces – out of their sports, video games, etc.

          It actually made me really happy when I saw Michelle Yeoh’s Bond girl because it just kind of made me feel like, “Hey, you can be a girl AND still be badass.” And for something even more dated, the Tomb Raider games also made me happy, even if my guy friends were always making lewd comments on her butt and boobs while playing as a kid.

          This does say something about me, yes. Perhaps I should have sucked it up and accept that? I mean, I don’t usually talk about this sort of stuff publicly so I hope I don’t sound whiny? – since that’s usually the response to these sorts of comments. I’m not complaining about the industry so much as noting that representation is a thing that matters. Maybe not to everyone, but it does make a big difference. At least to me, it does.

          I do understand your worry on token characters and political correctness over the quality of the work. And I agree, but I also think it’s got to do with 1) how the industry is populated by a certain demographic, and 2) how a lot of execs hold a very strong belief that that is what that sells. And this is why there are more and more people coming out to try make them understand that films and shows featuring more diverse characters have appeal and *can* sell, too. For now, it does seem like some people are valuing political correctness/social issues over the quality of the art, but I think it’s because there just aren’t enough works out there that fits in to this purpose yet. Once the market gets saturated with more diverse films, etc, it will turn its focus back on the core basics again (story, acting, character development, etc.)

          Seeing someone of your kind on the screen is a big affirmation when you usually are so used to seeing someone else’s story being told. The Korra ending actually made me feel less alone.

  • starss

    So we’re remembering Korra as “a feminist sequel”?

  • starss

    Well yeah, he’s getting into graphic novels. Nick clearly told him that his type of shows have no place on American television anymore.

    • Nine years of successful programming seems like a good place on American television to me.

      • starss

        In 2015? After they moved his shows online digitally and raced through them without a second thought?

        • BlueBoomPony

          So find a better network. I’m thinking Netflix original.

      • mechasus

        Not with how Nick has been treating his shows lately.

  • Mister Twister

    Not sure I like the sound of that. “Story about a culture that forbids women to read and write”? Are you implying something, Bryan? Are you giving us a hint?

    • BlueBoomPony

      What are *you* implying? People can’t write about dystopias?

  • mmm1928

    Korra may have been the main character of the sequel, but there were equally as many strong female characters in The Last Airbender. Katara was a strong willed person who put others before herself and because of her will she was able to become a water bending master in a short period of time, Toph was blind but used earth-bending not only for fighting but an extension of her senses, Azula was such a powerful fire bender her flames burned blue and showed a person with seemingly everything can have nothing, Suki was a warrior but she was still a girl at heart who was a timeless romantic, Tylee was spunky and preppy but a threat due to her chi-blocking and Mai may have always been bored and boring, but in the end she choose her love to Zuko over fearing Azula (I hated they broke up in the comics as it did not make sense due to this very reason)

  • This looks cool.

  • mechasus

    I might be checking out Threadworlds. The art design looks amazing and the story sounds good. You could cover all of your racial/gender minority bases with your characters, but it won’t save you if your story isn’t good.

  • Austin Buell

    I found it was hilarious that Korra as a series needed to have extreme amounts of violence and destruction in order to do things that would’ve been far better to solve at a diplomatic table. The Equalists wouldn’t exist as they were if the council wasn’t dominated by benders. Not to mention the narrative of benders being taken down falls flat when virtually most of the people who had their bending taken were criminals that for example killed Mako and Bolin’s parents. But that wasn’t the worst part. The worst part was that they destroyed nuanced characters like Tarrlok and Amon because they decided they should be full-blown evil.

    It would’ve made more sense for Amon to merge himself with the Evil Spirit than Unalaq. The Revolution was far too clean to have subsided completely peacefully that Amon losing it and becoming the Anti-Avatar would’ve been more preferential than being a son of some criminal talked about during fan service. They realize their leader is completely nuts , but its too late. No superhuman Mako or deus ex machina to give Korra all her powers back like it was nothing.

    Korra should’ve lost her powers and went on some spirit journey to regain her powers back, as the world falls into shambles. Then lose them again at the end of Book 2. End the series on a high note.

    • Yes

      I found it frustrating that there was so much
      opportunity for what should’ve been diplomatic solutions, but instead Korra’s spiritual development was mostly relegated to the supernatural.

      I expected so much more from Tarrlok and Amon. I loved the idea of villains coming both from evil and good sides of society but they messed it up, especially with that trite “they’re related” plot twist.

      I never liked the concept of relearning powers since that was done in the original much better and there’s nothing to be gained by forcing a character to relearn something they already know, but that could’ve been avoided by not taking away Korra’s powers in the first place. Don’t make sacrifices you don’t intend to keep, especially if the audiences know you won’t have the guts to keep them. I’m amazed at how even good shows (Wakfu, Green Lantern) don’t seem to get this.

      I’d say all seasons except the second one had great potential, but they suffered from unskilled writing. There were some lovely bases there for a great story, but the connections between them were either undeveloped or made no sense.
      I’d say the creators are really good at coming up with interesting concepts, but not so good at actually developing them into a coherent story. Which would explain why Avatar was such a masterpiece while Korra suffers from plot holes and flat characters. Not to mention the romance and tryharding (for lack of a better word) epic finales were incredibly damaging to the series’ integrity. The romance is probably the worst I’ve seen.

  • Jean Leano

    I just wanted to see what people thought about Threadworlds.. sounds cool

  • Chris

    One of the brightest stars in animation finally gets around to the graphic novel he’s dreamed of doing for years? So basically, this is his Nausicaa?

    Shut up and take my money!