UK Green Party Spot Remixes Classic Animation

Brew reader Graeme Edgeler points out an appealing Green Party animated spot created for elections in the UK earlier this year. Not only is the commercial inspired by Fifties animation design, it also seamlessly integrates animation and characters from two 1950s public domain industrial films: It’s Everybody’s Business and Stop Driving Us Crazy. It’d be cool to see more mashups between classic cartoons and new animation, just like how older songs are sampled and remixed by contemporary musicians.


  • http://jamessuhr.blogspot.com/ james suhr

    that is a really cool commercial. the most amazing thing was to be hearing people ask of their government the same things we are asking for here. does anyone know how that election turned out?

  • Brian O.

    Never has Socialism looked so pretty.

  • http://dailygrail.com/blog/8389 red pill junkie

    They’ve got my vote! :-)

  • Rextherunt

    It could be. Some where. Some time. If only people weren’t involved…

  • http://rockitpack.blogspot.com :: smo ::

    that’s fantastic! it’s nice to see a political platform with some design sense. let alone outlining and explaining their platform instead of just mudslinging.

    the 50′s animation segments were interesting too, and regardless of intentional or not they’re sort of used in segments representing bygone days about small business and driving and whatnot. so it’s somewhat fitting to see animation from the 1950′s representing those situations.

    hm.

    thanks!

  • Gajin French Fry

    Classic cartoons mashed up with current animation? What about Space Ghost? Sealab 2021? Harvey Birdman? Do those not count?

  • http://www.spiteyourface.com Tony Mines

    Seameless? I thought the public domain element was integrated pretty clunkily? Even on that tiny youtube version I can see where it awkwardly fades in, and that the rest of the spot uses no spool drift or (most importantly) film grain or weathering to integrate the two elements.

    That’s just laziness man, not innovation.