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Brad Bird’s ‘Iron Giant’ Is Getting An Art Book (Preview)

From the better-late-than-never department, Brad Bird’s iconic animated feature The Iron Giant is finally receiving the art-of book treatment. A testament to its enduring qualities, the book will be published this August, a mere 17 years after the film’s theatrical release.

The Art of The Iron Giant, written by former Animation Magazine editor Ramin Zahed, will be released by Insight Editions. The 160-page book promises lots of development artwork and storyboards that are standard for these type of books, as well as new interviews with Bird and other key members of the film’s creative team. The book will also include artwork from the newly restored scenes in the “signature edition” that debuted last year.

2016 promises to be quite the year for aficionados of Bird’s first feature film, whose initial release was botched by the incompetent management of Warner Bros. Audiences, young and old alike, will be able to rediscover the film, not just through this book, but also a fully-loaded Blu-ray release of the film that will include a fantastic making-of documentary directed by Emmy Award-winning documentarian Anthony Giacchino (The Camden 28).

Below, you’ll find a preview of some pages from the book. The Art of The Iron Giant can be pre-ordered on Amazon for $26.87.

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  • Sota de Lioncourt

    OMG YES

  • shonya.atmos

    WANT.

  • Nicolás M.

    Lo quiero YAAAAAAAA!!

  • Honest_Miss

    Without a doubt this movie did not get the treatment it deserved when it was released, and that’s a shame, but there’s something to be said for having a movie so great that it collects more and more fans as time passes. To me, movies that can pick up as dedicated a fanbase as this, with none of the initial hype and fanfare, are head and shoulders above the rest.

    • Barrett

      There is something to be said for being a “cult classic” whose legend only grows over time. And while I understand a lot of the criticisms hurled at Warner Bros. for the initial marketing of the film, when I look back on it, I sometimes wonder if anything would have made “The Iron Giant” a hit in its initial theatrical release.

      1999 was a very different time for animation and for intended audiences. This was pre-Shrek, and very early in the era of Pixar as a player in feature films. The late 90s were loaded with middling or worse 2D features, many trying to replicate the success of renaissance Disney, which itself was slipping by ’99. Crossover appeal for adults was noted, but was not considered a huge factor in marketing or even conception of the films. Most animated features were (even more than today) seen as “kids stuff” that maybe, if it’s REALLY good, has some appeal to some adults in the audience too. Adults going w/out kids to see animated features was still seen as the sole province of film and animation geeks, not something regular Joes & Janes did for date night. The Iron Giant was (for the vast majority of people) a completely new & unknown property. Even if the marketing had been spot-on, a lot of people would probably have thought “that mysterious retro robot movie looks kinda interesting” but would it have built a buzz akin to the way such things often do today? I doubt it.

      Tastes were different, and if something didn’t have the Disney or Pixar name on it, adults disregarded it unless the kids were yelping to see it. That’s thankfully changed today, with many other studios in the mix for feature animation, and more adults than ever seem to be into animation. But in 1999, I’m not sure if anything other than a “Disney” brand would have helped. (Even then, Disney’s Atlantis just a couple of years later tried and failed to build buzz as an adult-accessible adventure/mystery tale. Things were just different.)

  • Kurt
  • One of the most incredible works of art!